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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 40/2007

We received a few questions for The Forum but we always need new ones.  Do you have any quirky or interesting family stories for news News from the trenches or any new information for the Were you aware...........sections?  Next week's county for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be the country, Ireland. A new addition - a picture - is being tried for this week's Bulletin.  Hopefully this will not create too many problems for our readers.  If you don't get the picture and would like it, please email us and we will send it on.  Even the most sophisticated emailed newsletters have their idiosyncratic problems - I received no text at all for this month's National Archives UK newsletter.
 
In this Bulletin
 Announcements

 Favourite UK County Sites Next week's favourite county will be actually be a country:  Ireland.  Irish researchers are well aware of the problems of researching Ireland.  A fire in the early 1920's destroyed about two thirds of the parish registers; only fragments of the 19th century censuses remain; and full civil registration did not start in Ireland until 1864.  Still there are a lot of web-based resources available.  Please send us your favourites for next week's Bulletin. This week's favourite county was Sussex.  The silence was deafening - we received no suggestions for websites at all.   At the Family History Centre we have 116 films containing mainly Sussex parish records, the National Burial Index CD which contains 315,000 entries for Sussex and the British Isles Vital Records Index which has about 340,000 christenings and 70,000 marriages.  As usual the GENUKI website for Sussex is worth perusing closely.
 
The ForumQuestions:  Q1/40/2007.  UK.Edward Lawson was 9 months old on 2nd July 1837 when he died of 'Hoopingcough' at the farm called Beckside in Hellifield, near Settle in the county of York.  William Lawson, the Brother, Farmer's Son, was the informant.  If this is the person I think it is, he would have just been ten years of age.  Did an informant on a death certificate have to be 'of age' ?  This was also a very early certificate - so maybe restrictions weren't quite so tight?
 Q2/40/2007.  Wisconsin, USA.Our researcher is wondering why the groom in this wedding photo of about 1900 in Wisconsin is wearing an apron for this formal picture.  Also does the gentleman in the front have his hat balanced on a gun or a stick?  The rest of the photograph shows a neat two storey farmhouse in the middle of cleared fields with many tree stumps still visible and lots of women and children off to the right.  The groom has two glasses and an empty jug (of beer?) in his hands and a stogie hanging out of his mouth.  It is a great photo but why the apron? 

 
  Q3/40/2007.  USA.I can't find my grandfather on the Ellis Island database. The census says he came in 1877.  How do I find him?   
Films received in the 7 days ending 4 October 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 1 November 2007.
 
 
Film Content Film No
CAN NL St Joseph's RC PR 1874-1899 2169291
DEU Bresin CRs 1874 - 1883 1417608
DEU OLD Church Souces for Research 1045463
DEU Schwetz Kirchenbuch 1856 - 1918 0245588
ENG BDF Dunstable PR 1558-1749 1545404
ENG BDF Dunstable PR 1749-1812 0826468
ENG DEV South Molton PR 1601-1795 0917529
ENG WWI burnt records Powell, M.- 2263527
IRE WIC Delgany 1901 Census 1592785
ITL Petilia Policastro births 1843-1862 1916391
ITL Petilia Policastro births 1871-80 2164071
ITL Petilia Policastro deaths 1809-1852 1916636
ITL Petilia Policastro deaths 1853-1865 1916697
NLD Index to Dutch in French Army A-M 1963041
NLD Zeeland Hulst RC Pr 1715-96 0122382
POL Lodz Belcatow pr 1837-1844 0681033
USA IL Chicago St Cecelia's RC Pr 1885- 1752980
  

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes. 

 

 Were you aware.................. Scotland/CanadaA person with Scottish roots dropped in this week and made us aware of a few more useful Scottish websites:www.ayrshire-roots.com  This website has a number of databases which have been indexed for easy searching - about 220,000 records.  You must sign in with a password but the searching is free.  Databases include Poor Relief and World Wars Casualty indexes but the one our informant found most useful was the Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald database.  This has the index to many of the Birth, Marriage, Anniversary, Death, Memoriam, Missing in Action, etc. notices from this newspaper.  Our researcher found that even when the death was in Canada, notice may have been made in the hometown newspaper.   www.monaghan95.freeserve.co.uk  This website has access to photographs of many, many headstones and some Scottish towns.  While the photographs are no longer on the actual website, email the website owner and he will apparently email you back the requested photograph. Non-Conformist Birth, Marriage and Death Index On-line  The National Archives UK announced that they have put Non-confomist BMDs on-line.   BMD Registers provides access to the non-parochial and nonconformist registers 1567-1840 held in RG 4 and RG5.  As with all the other National Archives records, searching is free but you must pay to download each record.  

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours.
 Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. 
Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, reply to this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. 
Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 39/2007

Needed:  questions for The Forum and information for the News from the trenches and the Were you aware...........sections.  Next week's county for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be Sussex .

 

Email problems continue with a new twist last week.  It appears that some of our readers' spam-checkers did not like one of the websites for Scotland we had included in our Bulletin last week.  Please do let us know if you do not receive the Bulletin - this will help us determine the problem.  If you would like last week's Bulletin 38/2007 and did not get it, let us know and we will be happy to send it to you.  Remember to add our email address to your list of safe contacts.

 

In this Bulletin

 

Announcements

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's favourite county will be Sussex. 

 

This week's favourite counties were The Scottish Highland Counties. 

Vida Preece writes:  "Here are some links for Kintyre. 

     http://groups.msn.com/Kintyre/kintyregraveyards.msnw

     http://www.kintyremag.co.uk  (Back issues have quite a bit about genealogy.)

 

This website contains a pile of links for Scotland:

http://www.google.com/Top/Regional/Europe/United_Kingdom/Scotland/Society_and_Culture/Genealogy/Organisations/

 

This has a few links for Angus - http://www.genealogylinks.net/uk/scotland/angus/index.html "

 

Sheila Smith sent in a number of interesting websites:

Shetland Family History Home Page at: http://bayanne.info/Shetland/  It contains thousands of records of people born, married or buried in the Shetlands.  This should be everyone's first stop if they have a Shetland family.
 
Shetland Family History Society: http://www.shetland-fhs.org.uk/index.htm
 
Shetland Newspaper Transcriptions:  http://www.jghalcrow.co.uk/
Transcriptions of birth, marriage and death announcements in various newspapers, from 1872-1963.
 
Orkney Genealogy:  http://www.cursiter.com/indexNC.shtml
Also includes information on Caithness and the Shetland Isles.  It includes a large index of births, baptisms and marriages.
 
Highland Family History Centre:  http://www.highlandfhs.org.uk/Index.asp
 
The Scottish Emigration Database:  http://www.abdn.ac.uk/emigration/index.html
A searchable database put together by the University of Aberdeen, containing the names of over 21,000 passengers. Can be searched by name, town, port of arrival, ship's name etc. 
 
Am Baile: Highland History and Culture:  http://www.ambaile.co.uk/en/index.jsp
This site includes photos and audio collections of Highland life and heritage.

 

Dorothy Stewart adds:

"Here is a GREAT site I have found for MORAY/ELGIN (library index) - http://libindx.moray.gov.uk/mainmenu.asp 

(I have found a lot on my husband’s family members on it.)"

 

Gwen Armstrong suggests:

Shetland Newspaper Transcriptions  BMD 1873-1900 - http://www.jghalcrow.co.uk/bdm/bdm.html

 

Additionally, for the Lowlands (last week's counties) - Irregular Border and Scottish Runaway Marriages -

http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/famrec/hlpsrch/sumrmar/runmar.html

 

 

The Forum

Questions:   No new questions were received this week.  Please send some in.

Q2/37/2007.  UK.  Meaning of the term “of this parish” in marriage records.

Although the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834 which set up the Poor Law Unions and the workhouse system stipulated that the parishes within the union were required to support only the poor who had a right of settlement in those parishes, it seems that it did not prevent people from living and working outside their parish of settlement.  On the other hand, if they were guilty of vagrancy – begging or prostitution for example – they could be returned to their parish of settlement.

Marriage in a church requires that at least one of the parties has to be a resident of that parish and the banns of marriage have to be called in that parish on three consecutive Sundays (and in the other party’s parish if that situation applied) and that is the rule to this day.  However, this rule was easily circumvented.  To avoid the additional cost of calling the banns in two parishes a prospective bride or groom would establish “residency” at the address of a friend or relative during the period the banns were being called.  Nowadays it is commonplace for a couple who wish to get married in a “pretty” church rather than in their own parish church, will establish residency at a Bed & Breakfast in the desired parish at a special “don’t actually come here” rate.  The “pretty” parish church is happy with the additional income thus generated and could be counted on to not ask too many questions

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 27 September 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 25 October 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN PQ Grenville Baptist pr

2022285

CAN PQ Land records M-T Jul 1856-60

1723582

ENG BKS Wills Archdeaconry 1738-42

1042593

ENG BKS Wills Archdeaconry 1742-45

1042594

ENG BKS Wills Archdeaconry 1756-61

1042598

ENG BKS Wills Archdeaconry 1765-68

1042601

ENG BKS Tingewick PRs BMB 1560-1812

1042441

ENG CON St Ives PR 1651-1868

1595570

ENG ESS Great Clacton pr 1802-87

1702213

ENG ESS Little Clacton pr 1538-1963

1565719

ENG HAM Hambledon Bapt 1778 - 1812

1041206

ENG KEN Preston-Nxt-Faversham PR

2354700

ENG KEN Preston-Nxt-Faversham PR

2354699

ENG LAN Liverpool St Peter BMD 1823-1828

1068925

ENG OXF Banbury BTs BMBs 1606-1817

0095208

ENG OXF Fringford BTs BMB 1680-1856

0095248

ENG OXF Stratton Audley PRs 1696-1950

0887489

ENG Royal Artillery Desc. Books 1815-40

0867036

ENG Royal Artillery Desc. Books 1815-43

0866559

ENG Royal Artillery Desc. Books 1815-45

0866596

GRD Civil Reg 1910-1916

1523259

IND Bombay BMB vol 12 1835-1836

0523839

IND Reg of Madras Soldiers 1786-1839

1885890

IND Reg of Madras Soldiers 1840-1850

1885891

IRL Marriages Vol 7 1849

0101308

NLD Haarlem PR Index Ma 1578 - 1811

0540675

NLD Haarlem PR Index Mi 1578 - 1811

0540677

SVK Kemarok pr 1813-

1739452

SVK Kemarok pr 1813-

1739451

USA MI Muskegon Naturalizations 1898-

1787480

 

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

 

News from the trenches

Helen Billing noticed the call for useful websites for the Scottish Lowlands last week and wondered how many readers, interested in English genealogy, knew about Gretna Green marriages.  "Early on in my research whenever I could not find a marriage record, my mother would say 'Oh, they must have been married in Gretna Green'.  Interest piqued, I looked up Gretna Green marriages.  Gretna Green was on the stagecoach route between London and Edinburgh, and was the first changing post across the English border into Scotland.  When Lord Hardwicke's Marriage Act came into effect in 1753, brides and grooms under the age of 21 in England and Wales had to have their parent's permission to marry; and for all, banns had to be read or a marriage licence obtained (Jews and Quakers were exceptions to this part of the law).  However the Act did not apply in Scotland, where grooms could marry at 14 and girls at 12 without their parent's consent and banns did not have to be read.  The reading of banns in England occasionally resulted in objections being raised and the marriage could not take place.

 

Scottish law allowed for 'irregular marriages', meaning that, so long as a declaration was made, in front of two witnesses, almost anybody had the authority to conduct the marriage ceremony.  The result of these differences was that thousands of English couples were married in Gretna Green's blacksmiths' shops, inns and smallholdings by the owners, self-appointed 'ministers'. Later on, in law, a  Gretna Green marriage came to mean a marriage transacted in a jurisdiction that was not the residence of the parties being married, in order to avoid restrictions or procedures imposed by the parties' home jurisdiction.  A few (about 4500) of these marriages have been indexed at http://www.achievements.co.uk/services/gretna/index.php .

 

Currently in England and Wales couples can be married at 16 years of age with parents' consent and 18 without.  Couples can marry at 16 with or without parents' consent in Scotland.

 

Gretna Green has taken advantage of its history and still has a thriving wedding industry.  Marriages can be held in the Old Blacksmith's Shop, Anvil Hall, The Mill Hotel and Forge, etc.  I have seen estimates that 13 to 15% of all marriages in Scotland currently take place in Gretna Green."

 

 

Were you aware..................

 

The Federation of Family History Societies has searchable on-line databases which have been created by its member family history societies. You must create a user name and password to search the Index.  Searching is free but to obtain further details of an entry you will need to establish credit, minimum £5. In each case charges are shown before debiting your account. You have 6 months in which to spend this and each further credit that you add. The charges are very reasonable.  For example, one marriage record or baptism record costs a mere £0.06 to look at.  Have a look at:

     http://www.familyhistoryonline.net/

 

 

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours.

 

Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m. 

Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 

Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.

Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 

Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon.

 

Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line.

 

Toronto Family History Centre

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

Email:  Toronto_FHC@bellnet.ca

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 38/2007

 

More questions are needed for The Forum, and information for the News from the trenches and the Were you aware...........sections would be welcomed.  Next week's county for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be The Scottish Highland Counties.

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements - FHC early closing on Friday, September 21 and OGS Fall Courses & Scottish Family History Workshop

No new questions in The Forum but a couple of interesting answers

In Were you aware...   Irish Census records coming on-line; CBC's fall schedule includes "Who Do You Think You Are";  a new decade of overseas passenger lists departing from Britain; and marriage entries missing from the UK Marriage Indexes

 

Announcements

The Toronto Family History Centre will be closing at 2pm tomorrow, Friday, September 21

OGS Scottish Family History Workshop and Fall Courses

In two recent Bulletins, the name of James Thomson has been misspelled, first with respect to the course in British Army Records which he is teaching this autumn (http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html), and then with respect to a session entitled A Survey of Scottish Family History Resources in the GTA which he is delivering as part of the Toronto Branch OGS workshop Exploring Scottish Ancestry on Saturday, November 10 (http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/scottish.html). James is a frequent contributor to the Bulletin.

Additions to our Permanent Collections

 

Two CDs have been added to our permanent collections:

            ENG SRY Haslemere BMBs 1770-1812

            ENG Lincolnshire Marriages for Huttoft, Mablethorpe St Mary & St Peter with Stain, Stain, Mumby, Mumby Chapel, Trusthorpe, Willoughby and Wilthern

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's favourite counties will be The Scottish Highland Counties.  These include:  Aberdeen, Forfar (Angus), Argyll, Banff, Bute, Caithness, Clackmannan, Dunbarton, Fife, Inverness, Kinross, Elgin (Moray), Nairn, Orkney, Perth, Ross & Cromarty, Stirling, Sutherland, and Shetland.

 

This week's favourite counties were The Scottish Lowland Counties.

 

Wendy Frew sent in these suggested websites:

 

1.  www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk   (This is the government website.  Gwen Armstrong notes that it can be expensive. 6 pounds for 30 credits. Each search will cost you a credit. If you want to view the record it is 5 credits. If there happens to be a change to the record or Reg. of Cor. Entry, it is another 2 credits. It is easy to search and you can find a lot quickly but 6 pounds goes fast.)


2.  www.ayrshireroots.com


3.  Coal Mining History Resource Centre - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~cmhrc/


4.  Scottish Mining Museum - http://scottishminingmuseum.com


5.  Rampant Scotland - www.rampantscotland.co/genealogy.htm  There are lots of suggestions here. If researching Ayrshire, go to Ayrshire in Scotlands Gen Web section.  A useful email address would be Jill McColl at the Ardrosson Library's North Ayrshire Local History Department.  She was very helpful when I visited the Library.


6.  When visiting North Ayrshire, the North Ayrshire Cemeteries Service in Saltcoats is a goldmine.  It is within walking distance of the Ardrossan Library.

 

 

Gwen Armstrong suggests:

 

Scotland Borders Family History Society - http://www.bordersfhs.org.uk/  I like the Other Websites page. Lots of links to family/surname sites.

 

Mitchell Library - http://www.mitchelllibrary.org/virtualmitchell/ - old photographs of Glasgow which are searchable

 

National Archives of Scotland - http://www.nas.gov.uk/familyHistory/


Scotlands Family - www.scotlandsfamily.com

Scottish Lowland Family History Researchers - http://www.geocities.com/elnalexjoe/lowlands.html

 

Scottish Association of Family History Societies - http://www.safhs.org.uk/    I like this because it has links to all the Scottish Family History Societies. I don't have to go searching.

 

Catholic Church links - http://home.att.net/~Local_Catholic/Catholic-Scotland.htm

 

Scotland Census on-line - http://www.freewebs.com/mmjeffery/index.htm

 

Talking Scot - http://www.talkingscot.com/

 

Scottish Mining Villages - http://www.mining-villages.co.uk/index.html

 

National Library of Scotland – digital maps - http://www.nls.uk/maps/townplans/index.html

 

 

The Forum

Questions:   No new questions were received this week.  Please send some in.

 

Answers

Q3/37/2007. UK .

A musical question -  Can anyone recall the Parson's Nose song, because I want to start singing it to my nieces and nephews at carving time?

Paul Jones suggests that it might be this one:

"Here’s a link to a site with lyrics for a music hall number, “Christmas Day in the Cookhouse”, that may or may not be what your correspondent is seeking with regard to the parson’s nose. None of it is overtly off colour, but one suspects that there may be some euphemisms (e.g. “Fishcakes”) and perhaps some rhyming slang and other wordplay that escapes us today.

http://lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs/xmas/christmasdayinthecookhouse.shtml "

Q4/37/2007. UK/Newfoundland.

I am seeking advice regarding searching for my great great grandfather, Robert Woodman, who came from Devon and settled in New Harbour, Trinity Bay, Newfoundland in or about 1812. Could someone suggest a way over this brick wall?

 

Kathleen Lopez writes:

"I have spent considerable time researching Newfoundland settlers in the English records.  Most of the English fisherman who eventually settled in Newfoundland came from within 20 miles of the southern coast of England. They were hired at Fairs and given enough money to walk to their place of embarkation early in the spring.  This cuts down your search area for Robert Woodman considerably. If you consult Henry B. Guppy's book, " HOMES OF FAMILY NAMES IN GREAT BRITAIN", you will see that the name was most often found in Northumberland and Middlesex, thus it would not be a common name in the south of England. Spiegelhalter traced it in Devon.  Having said all that, there are exceptions. My own ancestor, who settled very close to yours in Trinity Bay, was born in 1799 in North Yorkshire, but spent his youth in  Bridport, Dorset.  The men who worked the fishing boats in England and who sailed to Newfoundland were considered a source for the Navy --- "a nursery for the navy".  There was even an early law which stated that every boat bound for Newfoundland had to have aboard a certain percentage of "green fishermen"  - men who were new to fishing. This was because a land soldier could be trained in a short period of time, but men aboard a navy vessel took a long time to train. Therefore the Newfoundland homeward bound fishing vessels were often boarded before returning to port and men were pressed into the navy. The moral of the story is that Robert Woodman may well have never set eyes on the sea before boarding that vessel that took him to Newfoundland.

 

"I would not put a lot of stock in the story of the 3 brothers. Every person I have ever talked to searching in Newfoundland has a story about 3 brothers coming from England to Newfoundland.  There seems to be something mystical about the number 3 in their family lore.  But don't be pessimistic as I have had great success searching for ancestors born in England, suddenly appearing in church records in Newfoundland, but with no clue given about their birth place.  The more uncommon a name the greater the chance of finding the individual in the English records.

 

"I had also great success in 1992 searching for the birth place of my Newfoundland NEWHOOK ancestor---with no idea of where he was born in England. No computer  at that time!!!  I went to the "GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH DIRECTORY" for 1989, 1990 1991 etc. and wrote to the several listed Newhook researchers and got a lead that way.  I would suggest that this gentleman go to the library and search back copies of the Directory and see where people were listing their Woodmans. I have looked at my Directory copies for late 1980 and early 1990  listings for WOODMAN and see that people were searching in certain parishes in Devon, Dorset, Wiltshire and Hampshire. I would start searching in those parishes for Robert Woodman."  ( Editor's Note:  The FHC has two " Genealogical Research Directories" in its library - the 2001 and the 2005 Editions.  They can be found in the General Research section - three green dots on the top shelf of bookcase #1.)

 

Along a similar line, the researcher could always check out the RootsWeb mailing list for Devon, searching for Woodman and the Rootsweb Message Boards for Woodman & Devon.

 

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 20 September 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 18 October 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN NF Marriage Index 1920-1922

2168861

CAN ON Kent Co. M 1925

2413310

CAN ON Lanark Co. M 1925

2413311

CAN ON Simcoe Co. Marriages 1925

2413322

IRE CAV Kilmore 1911 Census

0812123

ITL Pachino births

1466349

POL Lezajsk (Krzeszow) RC PR 1810-

2002535

 

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

 

Were you aware..................

Irish Census Records for 1901 and 1911
The Irish census records will be starting to go online this fall at www.nationalarchives.ie.  There will be both nominal indexes and the actual census images -- all free of charge. They will go on in stages, starting with the 1911 records for Dublin and then Belfast and eventually covering all 32 counties, including those now in Northern Ireland. They will be accompanied by contextual matter about the history and social conditions and wonderful pictures from the collection of the National Library of Ireland. Catriona Crowe, the Head of Special Projects at the National Archives of Ireland, was interviewed about the Irish Census Project on CBC Radio One, Ontario Today, on Monday, September 17. You can link to the interview at http://www.cbc.ca/ontariotoday/story_archive.html.  In order to listen to the broadcast you will need to have RealPlayer software on your computer. You can download this from: http://www.real.com.

Who Do You Think You Are? 

The CBC is producing a Canadian Version of Who Do You Think You Are?, the genealogical documentary show that follows celebrities as they discover the truth behind a family legend. The series was originally created for the BBC and has been extremely popular there. It is scheduled to premiere on Thursday 11 October 2007 at 7:30pm and will have 13 parts showcasing Canadian celebrities (like Don Cherry, Margot Kidder and Chantal Kreviazuk).

 

 

BT27 Overseas Passenger Lists Departing from UK Ports

James Thomson reports that an additional decade (1930-1939) of BT 27 passenger lists for overseas voyages departing from ports in the United Kingdom has now been uploaded to www.ancestorsonboard.com .

 

 

 

Missing UK Marriage Index Entries

Jean Harris alerts us to the fact that a few entries are missing from the published GRO marriage indexes for 1856, 1858 & 1861.  These missing entries are available at the following website:   http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/StCathsTranscriptions/#Missing .

 

 

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours.

 

Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m. 

Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Evening hours 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. starting October 2.

Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.

Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 

Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Closing at 2pm on September 21.

Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon.

 

Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line.

 

Toronto Family History Centre

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

Email:  Toronto_FHC@bellnet.ca

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 37/2007

 

Please keep sending your questions and answers for The Forum and information for the News from the trenches and the Were you aware...........sections.  Next week's county for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be The Scottish Lowland Counties.

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements - September Meeting of Toronto Branch of OGS and more information on the Scottish Family History Workshop

Two new questions in The Forum

News from the trenches  - a couple of amusing stories

In Were you aware...   that the National Burial Index has 13.2 million Records and that our Family History Centre Library can help you decipher those ancient and foreign documents and, finally, James Thomson reminds us of the proposed launch tomorrow of online indexes to and images of certain English Non-Parochial Registers.

Announcements

Toronto OGS Meeting    The next meeting of the Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society will be held on September 24, 2007 at 7:30 pm in the Burgundy Room of the North York Civic Centre (concourse level). The speaker, Bill Bienia, will talk about Genealogical Software Progams.  He will compare four of the leading genealogical programs for the PC (RootsMagic, Family Tree Maker, Legacy, and The Master Genealogist). Topics will include ease of use, source citations, augmenting bare facts, creating narratives and chronological profiles, generating charts and reports, books and Web sites, and using data with other programs such as word processors and spreadsheets. From 6:15 pm some members will be there with some of the programs on laptops for informal discussion. Guests are welcome to attend, particularly those who can assist with the pre-meeting demonstrations. If you are willing to help, please contact Linda Reid at reidlinda@rogers.com.

Scottish Family History Workshop - Exploring Scottish Ancestry

The Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society has announced the line-up of speakers and topics for the Scottish Family History Workshop to be held in Toronto on Saturday, November 10, 2007 at the North York Central Library Auditorium.  Both beginners and experienced researchers will find topics of interest.  Sessions are as listed below: 

        A:  Scottish Emigration & Canadian Settlement:  An Historical Overview - Dr. Kevin James

        B:  Building a Scottish Family Tree Using ScotlandsPeople - Marian Press

        C:  Scotland's Other Congregations and Churches:  Looking for Records - Sherry Irvine

        D:  Question and Answer Panel

        E:  Tour of the North York Central Library's Canadiana Department

        F:  Scottish Pedigree Analysis:  From the late 19th century back over 100 years - Linda Reid

        G:  A Survey of Scottish Family History Resources on the GTA - James Thompson

        H:  Valuation Rolls in Scotland - Sherry Irvine

        I:  General Register Office for Scotland - Paul McGrath

Full details, along with downloadable registration form, are available at www.torontofamilyhistory.org/scottish.html, or by request from 416-733-2608.  The program's sponsor is the St. Andrew's Society of Toronto and the program is supported by the Canadiana Department of North York Central Library.

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's favourite counties will be The Scottish Lowland Counties.  These include:  Ayr, Berwick, Haddington (East Lothian), Edinburgh (Midlothian), Roxburgh, Selkirk, Peeble, Lanark, Linlithgow (West Lothian), Renfrew, Dunfermline, Kirkcudbright, and Wigtown.  Please send us suggestions of websites you have found helpful.

 

Last week's county was Essex.  Frances Radford sent us the following three websites:

     http://seax.essexcc.gov.uk/login.asp - Essex Archives Online

     http://www.essexchurches.com/ _Photographs of Essex Churches

     http://www.essexpast.net/ - Victorian County History of Essex

 

Margaret Taylor adds:

     Essex Surname List - http://freespace.virgin.net/annemarie.shuttle/

     Essex Villages Site - http://www.essexvillages.net/index.html

     London, Essex & Kent Pubs, Inns, Taverns & Beer Houses History & Trade Directory - http://essexpub.net/

     Essex County Council Website(Local Studies) - http://www.essexcc.gov.uk/vip8/ecc/ECCWebsite/dis/guc.jsp?channelOid=15524&guideOid=17103&guideContentOid=15563

     A recent addition to the Online Parish Clerks: - http://essex-opc.org.uk/AboutUs.php

 

 

The Forum

New Questions

Q1/37/2007.   Czech Republic .

Does the FHC have microfilms of records in the Czech Republic, formerly Czechoslovakia, formerly Bohemia?  If so, how do I find them?

 

Q2/37/2007.  UK. 

What does "of this parish" really mean in UK marriage records?  I have seen the phrase for people seemingly born elsewhere and living elsewhere not long before or after.  It implies a person with a residence in the parish but how long do they have to lived there or does it mean anything else?

 

Q3/37/2007. UK .

A musical question - The tail end of a roasted turkey, the spade shaped part, is referred to as the parson's nose, or the pope's nose, depending on your religious affiliation.  When I was very young, dinner at my Grandparents house would often be roast turkey.  As it was trotted in to the table, my Grandfather would start to sing a song about the parson's nose, which must have had suggestive lyrics unsuitable for youngsters as  Grandmother would always hush him up in short order, to the guffaws of all the male adults present.  My Grandfather died when I was only eight so I never learned the words to The Parson's nose song. Can anyone recall this, because I want to start singing it to my nieces and nephews at carving time?

 

Q4/37/2007. UK/Newfoundland.

I am seeking advice regarding searching for my ancestors in Devon. My great-great grandfather, Robert Woodman, settled in New Harbour, Trinity Bay, Newfoundland in or about 1812. He married a Priscilla but we have not located a marriage record that might have parental information. They had a first child in 1815, but the baptismal record contains no additional information. Based on Robert's grave stone he died in 1868 age 85 which puts his birth about 1783. Family folklore says he was from Devon and left  England with two brothers, one of whom went on to settle in the Maritimes, perhaps PEI, and the other in the USA, perhaps near Boston. Based on the repeated family names, I would guess at their likely first names being either John, James, William or Edward.  I have been told that only a small number of Parish records have been filmed by the IGI/FHC, and to find a Woodman family in Devon, who had 3 sons born in the late 1700s who did not marry or die there would be impossible, because of the number of Parish records to search. And as yet I do not know Robert's birth town, nor the names of his parents. Could someone suggest a way over this brick wall?

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 13 September 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 11 October 2007

 

NO FILMS RECEIVED THIS WEEK

 

 

News from the trenches

 

Many thanks to Paul Branson for contributing the following stories:

 

After the Crimean War in the 1850's, His Majesty, the King of Sardinia, saw fit to award 400 medals to British troops for exceptional displays of Military Valour.   Here is an excerpt from the rolls outlining the bravery of Private P. McGuire, AND  the reason he never received his medal.

No. 3510 Private P, McGuire.... Was in advance on the 18th of June 1855 in the attack and capture of the cemetery by the Second Brigade Third Division.  Was one of those who reached close under the Russian Batteries.  Though severely wounded in the left hand, he remained at his post during the whole day, firing on the Russian Embrasures.

Why did he not receive his decoration for this meritorious service?  A hand written note in the margin explains all.

        "has deserted since he was recommended for the medal"

 

 

Many family researchers who are also interested in history will know that public schooling started in England around 1865.  As a teenager I would often visit my Great Uncle Horace to visit/interrogate him for family information.  He told me that when he was in school, in order to remember a date, the kids were often taught a song or verse.  Here are the words to a song he related to me about the start of the public school system in England, and you can tell, for what may have been the norm a generation earlier, there was now a stigma attached to people who lacked schooling  or were illiterate.  Dear old Uncle Horace was not much of a singer, so I do not remember the tune!

              The members of our school board

              must be men of common sense

              To do their duty nobly, without the least offence

              And for those who must still work

              To keep their families alive,

              Should be free of persecution, in 1865

  Were you aware..................

The Family History Centre has the set of four CDs of the National Burial Index.  These CDs contain 13.2 million burial records in England and Wales and complements the International Genealogical Index (IGI) which is mainly a finding aid to baptisms and marriages.  It is very fast and easy to use.  This is a volunteer project by the local family history societies, and some of the counties are better covered than others.  As pointed out last week coverage of Hertfordshire is almost complete for burials up to 1837; and this week's county, Essex, has more than half a million recorded burials listed.  If you do find any ancestors on the National Burial Index, do order in the LDS film to check the original parish records, if they are available.  You never know what interesting tidbits you might find - occasionally the parish clerk will write "Small Pox" or "Cholera" or "Suicide" or something much more interesting.

 

Our Family History Centre's library is another underused resource.  A couple of the more useful books are:

Abbreviations and Acronyms - Did you know that vid. means widow? or that vf. is a widower? or that av. is years lived (annos vixit)? or IGI is International Genealogical Index?  Have a look at this book when you come across a term you do not understand.

Following the Paper Trail - A Multilingual Translation Guide - This excellent guide is broken down into four basic sections by language groups - Germanic, Romance, Slavic and Other.  Each language within each group is starts with the alphabet and then proceeds with examples of documents and writing and common forenames in each country, and concludes each language with a genealogical dictionary.  One of our researchers of German records has relied entirely on this book for translations of the records she has been looking at.

 

The books in our FHC Library have a rather unorthodox filing system:  the general interest books have a series of blue dots (the two examples above have 4 blue dots for Interpretation of Records); books on Asia have gold stars; Canadian books have red dots; books about the States have green dots; books on England have red stars; Ireland has green stars; Scotland has blue stars; and Wales has yellow dots.  For a list of our books, have a look in the grey FHL books folder on bookcase 3, shelf 4.  A more detailed explanation of the filing system can be found in the back.

 

Non-Parochial Registers in England & Wales (RG 4, RG 5, RG 6, RG 7, and RG 8).   James Thomson writes: "As a brief follow-up to last week's extensive piece about the fact that these series at The National Archives (at Kew) are being digitized, don't forget that tomorrow, September 14, is the scheduled launch day for series RG 4 and RG 5 at: www.bmdregisters.co.uk ; more information about these series is on this website and in last week's Bulletin. The official names of these series is as follows:

RG 4: Registers of Births, Marriages and Deaths Surrendered to Non-Parochial Registers Commissions

RG 5: Birth Certificates from the Presbyterian, Independent and Baptist Registry and from the Wesleyan Methodist Metropolitan Registry, 1742-1840

 

I look forward to seeing how this information is presented online.

 

Some of these records, as noted in http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/familyhistory/guide/people/nonconformist.htm , have at least been partially indexed before; both the IGI and the British Isles Vital Records Index (2nd edition, on CD at the Family History Centres and the Toronto Reference Library), for instance, contain some entries drawn from these series. I have read that the IGI is estimated to include about 80% of entries in TNA’s RG 4 class. The British Isles Vital Records Index notably includes many entries from:

a) The Protestant Dissenters Registry (Dr. Williams’ Library) (containing records of nearly 50,000 pre-1837 births of children born to Baptist, Presbyterian or Independent/Congregationalist families; note that parents of the mother may be given)

b) The Wesleyan Methodist and Metropolitan Registry (10,000 births and baptisms, most 1818-1837; again, parents of the mother may be given)."

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 36/2007

 

We received a couple of questions for The Forum this week but please send us more questions or gems for the News from the trenches and the Were you aware...........sections.  Next week's county for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be Essex.

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements - Re-opening on Tuesday evenings on October 2

Acquisitions in Additions to our Permanent Collections

A couple of new questions in The Forum and an answer to last week's Polish question

In Were you aware...  Toronto OGS offers a one day Scottish Family History Workshop and Fall Courses in Genealogy; and James Thomson describes five new developments which we can look forward to, the first happening at the end of next week..

Announcements

The Family History Centre will be opening on Tuesday evenings 6:30-9:30 starting on October 2, for the winter.

 

Additions to our Permanent Collections

 

        BOOK    CAN  Western Canadian Directories on microfiche and microfilm - A Finding Aid

        CD         ENG SRY Stoke D'Abernon  Bap 1619-1812; Mar 1620-1812; Bur 1619-1812 (not complete)

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's favourite county will be Essex.  Please send us suggestions of websites you have found helpful.

 

Last week's counties were Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire.  The Hertfordshire Family History Society has transcribed all the burial data (137,000 entries) for the 138 parishes in Hertfordshire from 1800 to 1837.  It is part of the National Burial Index CD set which the Family History Centre has as part of its CD collection.  The NBI includes the following information (where available):  forename(s) and surname of the deceased; date of burial; age (if available); and details of the place where this was recorded.  The CD set can be found on the bottom shelf of bookshelf three.  Bedfordshire burials are also very well represented on these CDs, with approximately 356,000 burials listed for their 141 parishes.

 

Carol Lewis has again contributed many interesting websites - this time for Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire:

 

Genealogy in Hertfordshire - http://www.hertfordshire-genealogy.co.uk/index.htm

 

Hertfordshire old maps - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genmaps/genfiles/COU_Pages/ENG_pages/hrt.htm

 

Leighton Linslade Past Times - http://www.leighton-linslade.com/

 

Pictures of Olde Tring - http://www.oldtring.co.uk/

 

Hemel Hempstead War Memorial - http://www.dacorumheritage.org.uk/ww1-rolls-HemelHempstead.htm

 

Hertfordshire Family History Society - http://www.hertfordshire-genealogy.co.uk/data/websites/hfphs.htm

 

Bedfordshire Family History Society - http://www.bfhs.org.uk/

 

Bedfordshire Towns and Villages Photo Album - http://www.countyviews.com/beds/index.htm

 

Bedfordshire Gaol - http://www.schools.bedfordshire.gov.uk/gaol/

 

Poll Book of Bedfordshire 1722 - http://www.rabancourt.co.uk/abacus/p1722h.html

 

Poll Book of Bedfordshire 1784 - http://www.rabancourt.co.uk/abacus/p1784h.html

 

Bedfordshire and Luton Archives - http://blars.adlibsoft.com/form.html

 

Biggleswade History Society - http://www.biggleswadehistory.org.uk/ 

 

An incorrect Buckinghamshire link was given last week.  The Index to Robson's 1839 Directory of Buckinghamshire by David Kolle is - for names A-F: http://met.open.ac.uk/genuki/big/eng/BKM/Directories/bucksdira.html ; for names G-O:  http://met.open.ac.uk/genuki/big/eng/BKM/Directories/bucksdirg.html and for names P-Y:  http://met.open.ac.uk/genuki/big/eng/BKM/Directories/bucksdirp.html .

 

 

The Forum

Answers:  Q2/35/2007 Poland

My cousin believes her mother, born in 1907, was from a town in Poland called Swintsian.  Could someone suggest where this town might likely have been, and how the name might be properly spelled and pronounced?

Many thanks to Paul Jones for the following comprehensive answer: "I went to JewishGen (http://www.jewishgen.org/ ) and entered Swintsian in the search engine. My rationale: So many eastern European communities had a significant Jewish community in days of yore and have been extensively studied by Jewish genealogists.

 

Three communities came up. One was in SW Germany and can be easily dispensed with. Another Zbąszyń, 345 km west of Warsaw, was known as Bentschen c. 1900 and was part of Germany, so it doesn’t sound too convincing either.

 

The third, corresponding to one of the target communities identified by your correspondent, is variously written as Švenčionys [Lith], Sventzion [Yid], Święciany [Pol], Shventsian [Rus], Svencionyz, Shvintzion, Shvyentsiani, Shvyetsiani, Svenchan, Sventsian, Sventsiany, Swenziany, Svintzian and is part of present-day Lithuania. Between the wars, c. 1930, it was part of Poland, but before WWI, c. 1900, it was in the Russian Empire. This yo-yo existence certainly fits with the suspicions of the questioner. Note the also the almost exact identity between Swintsian as posed in the question and Shventsian as the town was c. 1900, as well as two of the name variants Swenziany and Svintzian. I’m not saying this is the right place—but it surely deserves to be studied carefully until something better comes along.

 

Your correspondent can pursue this further by going to http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Svencionys/svencionys.html where there is geographical and historical information about the town (albeit from a predominantly Jewish perspective), along with links suggesting further research, including one to the current municipal website (although it’s not in English!).

It might also be worth talking with someone who actually knows something about this part of the world, maybe someone from the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada ( Toronto) -  www.jgstoronto.ca/About.html ."

 

New Questions

Q1/36/2007.  Canada.   

Our fame spreads!  We are now receiving e-mails from England with new questions.  "I am interested in obtaining a full birth certificate for one of my ancestors -WILBERT FRANK DREDGE who was born in Nepenee, Ontario 25th October 1891."  Using this sparse information, FHC staff were able to find the marriage of Wilbert's parents in Napanee and Wilbert's marriage to Bertha Vosburgh in South Frederickburgh.  But we have been unable to find birth certificates for either Wilbert or Bertha.  In 1901 Wilbert is living with his maternal grandparents - George and Minerva Keller.  We found no trace of the death of Wilbert's parents - Harry or Harvey and Minnie.  Could anyone suggest a further avenue for exploration?  What percentage of births and deaths were registered in Ontario around that time frame?

 

 

Q2/36/2007.  USA. 

My immigrant ancestors spent their first few years (1905-1906) in Freehold, New Jersey.  I only know that they communicated by mail at a P.O. Box there, and we believe they lived on a farm, possibly with a relative.  Would anyone know how to trace the owners of US Post Box Numbers?

 

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 6 September 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 4 October 2007

Film Content

Film No

CAN NF Marriage Index 1892-1920

2168860

CAN NF Marriage Returns 1913-1922

2168997

CAN NF Placentia RC PR 1822-1944

2169241

CAN NF Placentia RC PR 1822-1944

2169240

CAN ON Carleton marriages 1925

2412462

CAN ON Victoria marriages 1925

2413330

CAN PQ Quebec St Patrick's CRs 1888-1896

1853794

DEU Mittelreidenbach PR 1755-1889

0584949

DEU Sien PR 1704-27, 1798-1869

0556072

ENG CON Scilly Isles PRs 1726 - 1834

0254230

ENG DEV Exeter Death Dty Reg 1796-

1368367

ENG DUR Chester-le-Street PR 1582-

0091090

ENG ESS Little Waltham PR 1538-1875

1526972

ENG HER Weston-Beggard PR 1591-

1040030

ENG LAN St Thomas L'pool BMD 1821 - 1875

1068943

ENG LEI Ashby de la Zouch BTs 1563-

0585295

ENG MDX Spitalfields PR mar 1783-1812

0592625

ENG MDX St Martin in Fields PR 1550-

0560373

ENG SOM Pitminster BTs 1597 - 1836

1470913

ENG WO 69/120 description books RA

0866580

ENG WO 69/79 description books RA

0866546

GRD Register of Records 1889-1894

1563414

IND Bombay CMBs 1835

0623839

IRE CAV Kilmore 1911 Census

0812125

ITL Pachino marriages

1466350

ITL Petilia Policastro PR 1866-1910

2164072

NLD Ede BMD 10 year tables 1883-1892

0518718

NLD Oldemarkt births 1863-1912

1300058

POL Lezajsk (Krzeszow) RC PR 1853-

2002536

POL Lodz Belchatow Births 1841-1851

0681034

RUS Zhitomir Metrical Books 1843-1885

1884071

SVK Nova Lesna Evang PRs 1859 - 1946

1791937

UKR L'viv Gk Cath Metr.Bks 1784-1847

1925039

UKR Zalszczyk RC PR 178-1881

2329199

USA NY NY City Marriage Index 1888-97

1653852

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches

Last week's feature on the County of Buckinghamshire mentioned a website for looking up wills of ancestors -  http://apps.buckscc.gov.uk/eforms/wills/search.aspx.  Helen Billing used the website (which she had submitted!) and found a number of useful wills, of which she had been unaware.  The note last week mentioned that copies of the wills could be purchased by mail but once the date has been ascertained, the appropriate LDS film can easily be ordered.

 

Were you aware..................

 

The Toronto branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society is offering a one day workshop on Scottish family history research on November 10, 2007.  For more information on this and their fall offering of family history courses, please see their website:  http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html .

 

James Thomson alerts us to future developments on five fronts in British Isles research, as follows:

 

" 1. Passenger Lists: Arrivals in the United Kingdom.

    In Bulletin 32/2007, of August 9, 2007, I answered a question which had been submitted to the Forum and which related in part to eastbound transatlantic passenger manifests, from North America to the British Isles. Just as there is a record series containing lists of westbound transatlantic passengers (and passengers on other voyages headed for ports overseas) prepared at the point of embarkation in the United Kingdom (series BT 27 at The National Archives (TNA) at Kew, London, entitled Board of Trade Passenger Lists Outwards, 1890-1960 – the series being indexed and digitized at http://www.ancestorsonboard.com/  ), so there is a record series containing eastbound transatlantic passenger lists (and lists of passengers on other voyages which originated at ports overseas) prepared at the point of arrival in the United Kingdom: the Board of Trade Passenger Lists Inwards, 1878-1960, which are held at TNA as series BT 26. For more information about the BT 26 series, see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=106 , http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=243  and http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/familyhistory/guide/migrantancestors/passengers.htm.

     In answering the Forum question, I had noted that, as part of its 2005-2011 digitization program, the aim of which is to place digital copies of all of TNA's most popular series online by 2011, TNA had indicated that it hoped to launch a project to digitize and index the BT 26 lists sometime this year, with a completion date of 2009.  There has been important news since. The partner in this undertaking now has been announced as Ancestry.co.uk, and it is hoped that some results from this indexing and digitization project may be uploaded as early as the fall of 2008. If, as with current Ancestry.co.uk databases, the resulting database is included in AncestryLibraryEdition, then, absent some catastrophic change in the status quo, such database would be freely accessible to all Toronto Public Library (TPL) cardholders at all TPL branches.

     How terrific it will be to be able to follow ancestors back and forth across the Atlantic, using tools such as (a) Ancestry's US Immigration Collection, containing indexes to and images of passenger lists prepared at the point of arrival in the US; (b) the equivalent databases for 1865-1935 Canadian passenger lists and related records being undertaken by Library and Archives Canada and Ancestry.ca (see my earlier e-mail); (c) the indexes, transcriptions and images of 1890-1960 passenger lists prepared at the point of departure from ports in the UK and now uploaded in part at www.ancestorsonboard.com ; and (d) this new database comprised of indexes to and digital images of 1878-1960 passenger lists (for eastbound transatlantic and other incoming voyages which originated overseas) prepared at the port of arrival in the UK. Remember also that ports now in the Republic of Ireland were included in the definition of UK ports up to the very early 1920s.

 

2. Registration of Aliens

Three other TNA series relating to immigration to the UK are being digitized and indexed by Ancestry.co.uk as part of the same general project, as follows:

HO 2 (Home Office: Aliens Act 1836: Certificates of Arrival of Aliens, 1836-1852)
HO 3 (Home Office: Aliens Act 1836: Returns and Papers, 1836-1860 and 1867-1869)
HO 5 (Home Office: Aliens' Entry Books, 1794-1921)

    For more information about the content of these series, see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=243#13 and http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/familyhistory/guide/migrantancestors/alien.htm 

 

3. Non-Parochial Registers in England & Wales (RG 4, RG 5, RG 6, RG 7, and RG 8)

    In February 2007, it was announced (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/stories/151.htm) that S&N Genealogy Supplies Ltd. would index and digitize several well-used TNA record series, including the series RG 4 to RG 8 inclusive, which contain "Non-Parochial Registers" from England and Wales. For more information about these series, see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/familyhistory/guide/people/nonconformist.htm but note that RG 4 - RG 8 do not include just Protestant nonconformist records (such as Quaker, Methodist, Independent, Baptist and Presbyterian records etc.); as Amanda Bevan notes on page 46 of Tracing Your Ancestors in the National Archives: the Website and Beyond (7th edition, 2006), "...in addition to several thousand Protestant Nonconformist registers, the collection also includes a number of Church of England registers from churches outside the usual parish structure, 77 Catholic registers, a few registers of foreign churches in England and some cemetery registers." Various records of clandestine marriages are also included -- many, though, of uncertain reliability.

    Next week's Bulletin will describe these series at greater length, as we will then be on the eve of the appearance online of the first fruits of this project: indexes to and digital images of two of these series, RG 4 and RG 5, are scheduled to launch at www.bmdregisters.co.uk on September 14, 2007, a week from tomorrow. For information about the launch, see http://www.bmdregisters.co.uk/launch_info.php and http://www.bmdregisters.co.uk/launch_info_list.php . (Many thanks also to Marian Press for having alerted me to the fact that the launch is reported as well in Family Tree magazine.)

    Some of these records, as noted in http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/familyhistory/guide/people/nonconformist.htm , have at least been partially indexed before; both the IGI and the British Isles Vital Records Index (2nd edition, on CD), for instance, contain some entries drawn from these series. The webpage just noted also refers to digest registers on microfilm at the Society of Friends Library in London; these manuscript Quaker records (compiled prior to the transmission of the registers themselves and their eventual deposit at TNA as series RG6) are also available at the Toronto (Don Mills) FHC.

 

4. Births, Deaths & Marriages at Sea

    The digitization and indexing project referred to in the preceding section also will include, in due course, these three TNA series respecting British-registered vessels and/or UK nationals (for more information, see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=246 and the sources mentioned therein):

BT 158: Registers of Births, Deaths and Marriages of Passengers at Sea (births 1854-1890, deaths 1854-1890, marriages 1858-1883)

BT 159: Registers of Deaths at Sea of British Nationals, 1875-1891

BT 160: Registers of Births at Sea of British Nationals, 1875-1891

    For launch information, see: http://www.bmdregisters.co.uk/launch_info_list.php .

    Note that BT 158 registers can now (and in future) be freely consulted on microfilm at the Toronto (Don Mills) FHC; the film numbers are 1419469-1419472 inclusive. For the BT 158 registers, see also http://www.findmypast.com/resources/bmdatsea/ .

 

5. Overseas Baptisms, Marriages and Burials of UK Nationals

    The digitization and indexing project referred to in Section 3, above, also will include, in due course, the TNA series RG 32 to RG 36 inclusive, containing non-statutory returns of certain overseas births/baptisms, marriages and deaths/burials deposited with the Registrar General (for more information see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/familyhistory/guide/migrantancestors/overseas.htm ). For launch information, see: http://www.bmdregisters.co.uk/launch_info_list.php  

    The first webpage in the preceding paragraph refers also to records of baptisms, marriages and burials in British India; remember that indexes to these are held at the  Toronto (Don Mills) FHC, and that the original entries on microfilm can be borrowed from Salt Lake City. Lastly, the same webpage refers as well to registers and transcripts (of entries of overseas baptisms, marriages and burials) now at the Guildhall Library (for which, see also http://www.history.ac.uk/gh/overseas.htm); I understand that more good news on this front, also, may soon be forthcoming from the Toronto (Don Mills) FHC."

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 35/2007

 

We received a few questions for The Forum this week but new questions or information for the News from the trenches and the Were you aware...........sections are really helpful.  Next week's counties for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire.

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements - Holiday closing

Acquisitions in Additions to our Permanent Collections

Three questions to set you thinking in The Forum

In Were you aware...  James Thomson describes the new (beta) interface for free searches in historical issues of the London Gazette; we list the Toronto OGS Fall Courses in Genealogy; Margaret Taylor tells us of Genealogy Podcasts (!)

Announcements

As announced last week, the Family History Centre will be closed this Saturday and Monday for the holiday weekend.

 

Additions to our Permanent Collections

 

New fiche have arrived to augment our permanent collection:

    6128583  ENG NTH Peterborough  St. John Baptisms 1789-1807; Burials 1781-1807

    6142044  ENG OXF Hethe (Heath) St Edmund & St George Bap 1679-1997; Mar 1701-1997; Ban 1755-1994; Bur 1678-1997   

    6129458  ENG NTH Woodford nr Thrapston PRs Baptisms 1806-1812; Burials 1801-1812

    6129474  ENG NTH Woodford nr Thrapston PRs Baptisms & Marriages 1764-1812

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's counties will be Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire.  If you have found any useful internet sites for these counties, please let us know.  Last week's county was Buckinghamshire.

 

Carol Lewis has contributed a great list of internet sites:

 

The Buckinghamshire Surname List - http://webpages.charter.net/dcarlsen/genuki/BKM/bucksurname.html

 

The Buckinghamshire Family History Society - They have a new online store where you can purchase parish records for some parishes, on fiche, paper or CDs which are easy to use and great aids for research. They also have other records available.  They have a data base of birth, marriage and burial records for many parishes and offer searches of these for a reasonable fee. - http://www.bucksfhs.org.uk/

 

1841 census transcriptions for:

    Gt. Marlow - http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~maryc/marlow1841.htm

    Aylesbury - http://www.lanchbury.id.au/genealogy/aylesbury1841.html

    Waddesdon - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~lanchbury/waddesdon1841.html

    Hedgerley - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~lanchbury/hedgerley1841.html

    Grandborough - http://www.lanchbury.id.au/genealogy/bledlow1500.html

    Fulmer - http://www.lanchbury.id.au/genealogy/fulmer1841.html

 

Transcription of Parish Register for Bledlow Ridge - http://www.lanchbury.id.au/genealogy/bledlow1500.html

 

All of the above census and parish registers transcriptions can be found at the Lanchbury site map - http://www.lanchbury.id.au/genealogy/sitemap.html

 

A one place study of Wing, Buckinghamshire - http://www.wing-ops.org.uk/index.html

Victorian Prisoners, Aylesbury Gaol - http://apps.buckscc.gov.uk/eforms/libPrisoners/index.aspx

County Photos   Buckinghamshire/Bedfordshire - http://www.countyviews.com/

Buckinghamshire Poll 1784 - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~pobjoyoneill/ENGPOLLS/buck1784.html

Beautiful pictures and some local history for the area around Lacey Green - http://www.petergoodearl.co.uk/laceygreen/speen/speen.htm

 

Another reader adds a few more sites:

Buckinghamshire Wills Index On-Line - http://apps.buckscc.gov.uk/eforms/wills/search.aspx  Archdeaconry of Buckingham Wills 1483-1858. Searchable Index of testators. Wills may be purchased by post.

 

The People of Tingewick - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~tingewick/  A very comprehensive look at the inhabitants of Tingewick, complete with family trees, pictures, census transcriptions, etc.

 

Pigots's Trade Directory 1830  -  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/%7Epobjoyoneill/tradedir/bkm1830/bkm1830.htm An index of the trades people of Bucks giving their location and the page number of the original publication.

Robson's Directory 1839 - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/%7Epobjoyoneill/tradedir/bkm1830/bkm1830.htm  An index of names with trade and location.

 

Bucks Family Websites - http://www.rootsweb.com/~engbkm/websites.html  A list of the families of Bucks who have their own website.

 

The Forum

 

New Questions

Q1/35/2007.  England.   

In the 1901 Henry Cook, a groom, is shown as living in Great Holland, Essex "In the Street" as were many other families. Almost all seem to be employed.  What does this mean?

Basically this means that Harry is living on " Main Street".  Because Great Holland is rather small, despite its name, there was no need for street names or numbers in 1901.  The Street was enough for the postman to find Harry.  Because Great Holland is so small, using old Ordnance Survey maps you can probably pinpoint the very house Harry lived in.  Go to Old-Maps-UK:  http://www.old-maps.co.uk/indexmappage2.aspx   and enter "Great Holland, Essex" in the Search Bar.  A map of the town will appear.  Scroll down and you can chose a map of three different dates.  As the census to which you refer is 1901, try looking at the 1898 map.  On the census page, you will notice that Harry is living right next to Manor Farm.  So his house is the dot to the right of Manor Farm and the other residents who are living "In the Street" are living in other buildings along the main road. 

 

Q2/35/2007.  Poland. 

My cousin believes her mother, born in 1907, was from a town in Poland called Swintsian. We know that the people from that geography called their area " Poland" but it may, in fact, have been Russia.  Because of spelling and transliteration, I am not sure where the town is located or how it would be pronounced or spelled in the correct language. I have found two likely locations. The first is about 50 km north-east of Vilnius in today's Lithuania, called Svencionys, and the other possibility is in today's Poland, either Szczecin or Szczecinek. Could someone suggest where this town might likely have been, and how the name might be properly spelled and pronounced?

 

Q3/35/2007.  England. 

Our reader writes that "his wife's family is causing him problems" (only genealogically, we trust):   One of my wife's relatives married Edward Kennard born 1829 Bologne. How can I learn if he were a British or a French Subject ? None of the censuses that I have seen has indicated anything, nor does the IGI.

 

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 30 August 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 27 September 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN NB Saint John Cathdl PR 1855-1861

0861217

CAN NB Saint John Cathdl PR 1862-1868

0861218

CAN NB Saint John Cathdl PR 1868-1873

0861219

CAN NB Saint John RC PR 1837-1858

1412416

ENG LAN Mancheser cathedral burials

2357001

ENG LAN Ringley St. Saviour's pr

2356506

ENG Mil. Recs. (Unburnt) 1914-1920 G

1735234

ENG wills 1891 'H'

1544514

ENG YKS Northowram PRs 1744-1837

0828149

ENG YKS Skelbrooke BT 1609-1836

0919308

NLD Medemblik RC PR 1664-1811

0115813

NLD Medemblik RC PR 1750-1811

0115816

WLS DEN Wrexham Ruthin Road Mis

2276537

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

Were you aware..................

 

United Kingdom . Gazettes Online. James Thomson writes: “A new and improved (beta) interface for free searches of archived issues (back to February 1665/6) of the London Gazette (and, in due course at least, the Edinburgh Gazette for Scotland and the Belfast Gazette for Northern Ireland), is available at http://beta.gazettes-online.co.uk/ . This is the official (government) newspaper of record, and here we find things such as, by way of example: notices of and citations for honours, awards and medals, and of admissions to orders of chivalry; announcements of military, naval and militia appointments and changes of rank; official despatches during wartime; notices of civil, church and legal appointments; announcements of changes of name; notices respecting the naturalization of aliens; and notices or advertisements respecting company and partnership dissolutions, insolvencies and bankruptcies, and claims respecting estates, etc.. There are useful descriptions at: http://www.opsi.gov.uk/official-publications/gazettes.htm and at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Gazette .

    An "Advanced Search" interface for searches in the archived issues is at http://beta.gazettes-online.co.uk/AdvancedSearch.aspx ; search terms are entered in the "Words" section, and there is an option to restrict the search to a date range of one's choice (or to certain pre-defined "historic events", such as World War 1). (There is also a "Search Builder" facility at http://beta.gazettes-online.co.uk/SearchBuilder.aspx?Step=1 which permits one to construct a search one step at a time.) The results which are returned are presented first as snippets; if any one looks interesting, click on "See PDF" to launch Adobe Reader and see a digital image of the full relevant page of the Gazette. If one then wants to go back a page or forward a page within the Gazette, change the page number in the "Go to Page" box above the digital image, and click on "Go". Happy searching!"

 

Autumn Family History Courses

The Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society is offering a number of diverse and interesting courses this fall:

Basic Genealoy and Family History - Jane MacNamara

Introduction to English Family History Research - Linda Reid

Researching Community & Municipal Records at the Archives of Ontario - James Gordon & Keisha Gordon

Wehe There's a Will, There's a Way: Finding Ontario Estate Files - Jane MacNamara

Advertising Your Ancestors - Marian Press

Finding Your ancestors in Newspapers - Marian Press

British Army Records - James Thompson

More detailed course information can be found on the OGS website:  courses@torontofamilyhistory.org

 

Podcasts

Magaret Taylor write to tell us of podcasts produced by the National Archives, available free for download from:

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/rss/podcasts.xml

There are currently 23 podcasts available including Wills; Births and Deaths at Sea; and Sources and Resources at the Family Records Centre.

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 34/2007

 

Please send us more questions as we have received no new questions for The Forum or interesting tidbits for the Were you aware...........section.  Next week's county for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be Buckinghamshire.

 

In this Bulletin

FHC holiday closures in Announcements

Acquisitions in Additions to our Permanent Collections

Book Sale in News from the Trenches

Announcements

The Toronto Family History Centre will be closed on Thursday, August 30 due to staff holidays.

It will also be closed for the Labour Day holiday on Saturday, September 1 and Monday, September 3.

 

Additions to our Permanent Collections

The Family History Centre has purchased 13 CD's from the Manchester & Lancashire Family History Society.  They are transcripts of much of the 1851 census for Manchester, Salford and the surrounding area which were damaged by water while in storage, making them impossible to film.  The data recovery on each CD ranges from 57% to 97%.  Below is the description of each CD and the FHC CD number.  You will find them on the third shelf of the third bookcase.

 

BR35

ENG LAN Ashton-under-Lyne 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR36

ENG LAN Chorlton-on-Medlock 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR37

ENG LAN Ardwick 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR38

ENG LAN Prestwich, Blackley & Harpurhey 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR39

ENG LAN Pendleton & Pendlebury 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR40

ENG LAN Oldham Below Town 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR41

ENG LAN Salford, Greengate 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR42

ENG LAN Manchester, St George 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR43

ENG LAN Hulme 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR44

ENG LAN Deansgate 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR45

ENG LAN London Road 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR46

ENG LAN Rusholme, Gorton & Openshaw 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

BR47

ENG LAN Salford, Regent Road 1851 Census Unfilmed Returns (Transcripts)

 

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's county will be Buckinghamshire.  Please send us your suggestions.

 

This week's county is Suffolk.  We received the following ideas from Margaret Taylor:

Suffolk Record Office:  http://www.suffolk.gov.uk/LeisureAndCulture/LocalHistoryandHeritage/SuffolkRecordOffice/

Suffolk Surnames of interest:  www.suffolk-surnames-list.co.uk

RAOGK ( Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness) Look ups by volunteers:(Scroll down for England/Suffolk)

http://www.raogk.org/england.htm

and of course Genuki:  http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/SFK/

 

Ellen Maki writes:  Here are some websites that I have found useful in my Suffolk research:

Index to cemeteries located along the Waveney River The Waveney District Council Cemetery Index:  http://www.waveney.gov.uk/Environment/Cemeteries/cemeteries_index.htm (The records for Lowestoft are particularly useful going back to the late 1800’s.)

The Cosford database is run by Ray Long:  http://fp.raylong.plus.com/ 

The following site doesn’t contain any genealogical information, but it’s interesting to see our ancestors’ places of worship.  http://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/     (It has excellent pictures of 585 Suffolk churches with accompanying text describing the churches.  Check out Southwold St. Edmund - the pictures of the rood screen and the carved hand rests in the choir stall are quite amazing.)

4.       The Suffolk Family History Society:  http://www.suffolkfhs.co.uk/   (It has a very good links page.)

 

More Welsh sites:  Thanks to Sheila Emblem who found the following sites very helpful in researching her ancestors in Flintshire, NE Wales:

http://www.clwydfhs.org.uk/index.shtml   

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mossvalley/index.html  ;

http://www.northwalesbmd.org.uk/

 

Vida Preece writes:  'One of my favourite ways to look up names is the following.  I go to the Google search engine.  I then type in the name of an ancestor inside quotes.  i.e.  "Thomas Brown"  I sometimes add the spouse in separate quotes. "Isabel Watt".  I then put in the name of a place such as Murroes.  It's amazing how often I find someone who is also researching the same people.'

 

 

The Forum

 

Answers to Previous Questions

Q1/33/2007.  Canada.    Eleazar King (Roy? Roi? Leroy?)  was born in Lower Canada ( Quebec) in 1811/12.  His descendants were listed as "French" on the census forms, so obviously his name must have been changed. He was married and lived for a time in the Niagara region (St Davids) before moving to Brantford.  Would anyone have an idea as to how I might go about tracking down Eleazar and his ancestors?

Susan Hampton suggests:  The person trying to track down Eleazar King/Roy/Roi/Leroy may find this site useful:  http://www.bms2000.org/default.aspx  

This site was one of many recommended by the Societe Franco-Ontarienne at a course held at the North York Reference Library last spring.  To access the site, a password is required, which can be obtained without charge.  Limited information can be obtained for free, but there is a small charge for more complete information.  The details of Catholic marriages which occurred in the province of Quebec and in some northern Ontario parishes are provided on this site.  A certificate lists the name of the bride and groom, their parents, former spouses (if any) and the date and place of the marriage.  There are many options for searching.  One can search by the name (or first part thereof) of either spouse or of the parents of the bride or the groom.  There are also some baptism and burial records available.  

 

The North York Reference Library also holds a number of parish records, available upon request.  If you know the area where the wedding likely occurred, you may be able to track down some information this way.

 

Your editor found in the Ontario census records from 1851 to 1881 that Eleazar (Ebenezer, Elizar) King was married to a Mary, but found no trace of a previous wife or children.

 

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 23 August 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 20 September 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN ON Leeds Co. Marriages 1923

1838208

CAN ON Toronto Marriages 1923

2266923

ENG KEN Boxley PR 1559-1876

1473727

ENG KEN Boxley PR 1678-1895

1473728

ENG Military Records A-E 1914-1920

2081342

ENG SOM Staple-Fitzpaine BTs 1599-1855

1470977

FRA Pais-Bas history

1181886

GRD Civ Reg Births 1905-1910

1523217

IDN Dutch Nationals fam archive Kl-Kis

1304067

IND Bombay CMBs 1864

0523923

ITL Petilia Policastro PR 1872-1910

2164073

JAM Marriages 1848-1871

1291746

JAM St. Andrew pr 1664-1870

1291698

NLD Amsterdam Marriages 1758-1783

0114685

NLD Amsterdam Marriages 1761-1769

0114668

POL Lodz Belchatow B 1851-61 D 1854-58

0681036

POL Lodz Belchatow D 1838-53 M 1844-64

0681035

POL Poznan Wladyslawow (Turek) 1776-1807

0764480

RUS BES Borodino familybook 1881-00

1768282

RUS St. Petersburg 1885

1897692

SCT Edinburgh Wills 1798

0231129

SVK Nova Lesna RC PRs 1762 - 1895

1791936

UKR L'viv Gk Cath Metr.Bks 1841

2270165

UKR L'viv Uhnow RC PR 1680-1945

2039909

UKR Zalszczyk RC PR 1763-1879

0757268

USA NY Manhattan - AD8 Census 1905

1432883

USA NY state census 1905 ad 16

1433091

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

 

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the Trenches

 

British Family History Books.   Linda Reid tells us that GENfair - the on-line bookstore of the Federation of Family History Societies (UK) - is closing down. Many books are now less than half-price. For researchers of British family history there are bargains at:  www.genfair.com/shop/pages/fed/index.html

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 33/2007

 

The drought of film arrivals ended this week with 40 films being received.  Some Bulletins bounced back to us last week but not too many.  Keep sending us questions for The Forum and snippets for the News from the trenches and the Were you aware...........sections.  Next week's county for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be Suffolk.

 

In this Bulletin

We draw your attention to a TV programme in which we were involved, in Announcements

Interesting acquisitions in Additions to our Permanent Collections

Two questions to set you thinking in The Forum

Australian Electoral Rolls and Saskatchewan homesteading are dealt with in Were you aware...............

 

Announcements

On the History Channel at 6.30 p.m. on Saturday 18 August, the Ancestors in the Attic programme is showing for the first time an episode that we were very much involved with and which we reported on briefly in a previous Bulletin.  This involved a lady living here in Toronto who was adopted as a baby in Scotland.  We were successful in locating birth relatives but there are many twists to the story and we are told that at one point the entire film crew were in tears. Enjoy!

Additions to our Permanent Collections

We are very pleased to announce, thanks to Paul Branson's donation, that we now have the Crimea War Medal Roll 1854-1855 and the Afghan War Medal Roll 1878-1880, both in CD form.

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's county will be Suffolk.  Your suggestions are invited.

Thanks to Kathy Hartley we have some more Shropshire sites:

http://www.shropshire.gov.uk/research.nsf
 http://www.secretshropshire.org.uk/
 http://www.sfhs.org.uk/
http://www.a2a.org.uk/)     This is very useful for Shropshire research as many of the Shropshire record  indexes have been
computerised.
This week we should be dealing with the Welsh counties but we have only one submission:

Anne Crawford writes: "I found this site while browsing for incidental information on Cardiff, and imagine my delight in finding a photo of my grandmother's parish congregation, c.1912, with her entire family there.  Some of them I had never had a picture of before.http://www.tlysau.org.uk/en/index  Welsh cultural history"

 

The Forum

 

New Questions

Q1/33/2007.  Canada.    Eleazar King (Roy? Roi? Leroy?)  was born in Lower Canada ( Quebec) in 1811/12 and was a Roman Catholic.  His descendants were listed as "French" on the census forms, so obviously his name must have been changed. He was married and lived for a time in the Niagara region (St Davids) before moving to Brantford.   He died in 1905 and was buried in the "Catholic cemetery" in Brantford.  No information is available there.  I have tried the Drouin collection on ancestry.ca, but can't get anywhere.  Have been unable to find out anything about his first wife's death in St Davids or her burial location, or indeed, anything about her father's ancestry. Would anyone have an idea as to how I might go about tracking down Eleazar and his ancestors?

Q2/33/2007.  England/Canada.  I am seeking advice regarding searching for my ancestors in Devon. My great-great grandfather, Robert Woodman settled in New Harbour, Trinity Bay, Newfoundland in or about 1812. He married a Priscilla but we have not located a marriage record that might have parental information. They had a first child in 1815, but the baptismal record contains no additional information. Based on Robert's grave stone he died in 1868 age 85 which puts his birth about 1783. Family folklore says he was from Devon and left  England with two brothers, one of whom went on to settle in the Maritimes, perhaps PEI, and the other in the USA, perhaps near Boston. Based on the repeated family names, I would guess at their likely first names being either John, James, William or Edward.  How can I discover some more details of these people and where in Devon (if in fact they came from Devon) they lived?

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 16 August 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 13 September 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

BRB Marr Index C-P 1849 - 1912

1159608

CAN NF deaths bks4-6 1902 - 1914

2168728

CAN ON Trafalgar Land Recs 1808-1958

0179050

CAN ON Trafalgar Land Recs 1808-1958

0179049

CAN ON York & Wentworth Marr 1923

2266942

CAN PQ Grenville PR 1883-1899

1992903

ENG GLS Clifton BTs 1786-1837

1595528

ENG GLS Tewkesbury PRs 1779 -1847

0856972

ENG MDX St George's chapel Mayfair pr

0845233

ENG OXF Bicester PRs 1539 - 1812

0887478

ENG SAL Ellesmere PCRs 1685-1726

1911406

ENG SAL Ellesmere PCRs 1726-1804

1911407

ENG SAL Ellesmere PCRs 1727-1755

1911405

ENG SAL Ellesmere PCRs 1728-1779

1911408

ENG SAL Ellesmere PCRs 1776-1777

1911409

ENG SAL Middle PCRs 1671-1920

1702903

ENG SAL Middle PCRs 1671-1920

1702879

ENG SOM Frome BT 1598-1826

1470972

ENG WW1 Burnt Records Jones, Thos.

2300813

ENG WW1 Unburnt Records - Keir

1879019

ENG YKS Doncaster BT 1711-1814

0919338

ENG YKS Horbury BT 1598-1812

0844552

ENG YKS Topcliffe BTs 1600 - 1820

0918435

ENG YKS Topcliffe BTs 1820 - 1856

0919050

ENG YKS Penistone PR 1600-1815

0919311

IND Madras BMB V.22-24 1844-1845

0521844

IND Madras PR tscpts BMB 1784-1808

0506955

IRL LDY Templemore 1911 census

1840295

IRL WIC Delgany 1901 census

1592897

JAM Misc. Parish Reg. BMD 1860-

1291710

NLD C.C. van Valkenburg Genealogy

1393243

NLD Amsterdam Marr Indx 1578-1650

0536925

NZL NI Electoral Rolls H-N 1905 - 1906

0420066

POL Stendsitz RC PR Marr Dths 1847-

0544865

SVK Velka Lomnica PR 1784-1944

1791934

SVK Vrbov PR 1783-1860

1791920

SVK Vrbov PR 1867-1925

1791921

USA MA Boston Arrivals Jan/May 1902

1724623

USA MA Boston Arrivals May/Aug 1902

1724624

USA NY Inbound Passengers 1820-46 'H'

0350242

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

Were you aware..................

 

Australia .  The Electoral Rolls for New South Wales 1903, Western Australia 1901 and Tasmania 1903, which are the nearest you can get to census information for Australia, are now available on a CD published by the Australian Institute of Genealogical Studies.  Unfortunately the cost is $150 and so unless some fairy godparent steps up there is very little chance of this appearing in the Toronto Family History Centre.

 

Canada , Saskatchewan.  Gwen Armstrong draws our attention to a site http://sasksettlement.com/   Saskatchewan Settlement Experience.  She writes " I particularly liked it for the explanation it gave of homesteading. How you got one, what kind of forms were filled out. What it cost.  Found some interesting old photos of churches some with a brief history. Very easy to navigate and the search engine is excellent".

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 32/2007

 

Several readers have reported that they did not receive last week's Bulletin although we did not get a bounce back - and these readers report that this is the first time that this has happened.  We know not why.  Our Bulletins are numbered sequentially so if you are missing one let us know and we will send out a copy to you.

The snail mail dearth continues.  Not a single film has been received this week, the second week that this has occurred.  It seems that a one day holiday disrupts the mail for a long time.

 

Meanwhile we have to report that we have not received any questions this week for The Forum neither have we got any of those priceless nuggets for News from the trenches.  Your contributions are invited.

 

And just to compound the misery the Favourite UK County Sites section which this week was to cover the whole of Wales, received less than stellar support, only one comment having being received.  We know that quite a few readers have Wales interests so we will leave this open for another week but we seem to have exhausted the major counties and we now pass this over to our readers to tell us which counties they would like to see featured.

 

In this Bulletin

As there were three questions in last week's Forum all relating to passenger lists we are dealing with this in some detail, James Thomson having gone above and beyond to solve these reader's problems.  We are putting this in The Forum section although it could equally well have fitted in the Were you aware.......... section.  We would urge all our readers with UK/Canadian ancestry to study this section.

We draw your attention to another site for those of you with British India connections in the Were you aware........... section.

Favourite UK County Sites

 

This week's counties were to have been the 13 counties of Wales.  As noted above we are holding this over for another week.

 

 

The Forum

 

Answers to Previous Questions

Q1/31/2007. England/Canada.  George Prosser came to Canada from England in 1903 with his wife Sarah and children, George Henry, Rowland, Harold, Herbert, Claud and Lily.  They homesteaded in Saskatchewan.  What ship did they come on and what route did they take to get to Saskatchewan?

James Thomson writes: “As things stand at the moment, the easiest place to start is with the indexes to, and digital images of, the passenger manifests prepared at the point of departure in the British Isles; these are available at http://www.ancestorsonboard.com/, which has been described in various past issues of the Bulletin. The enquirer will be able fairly readily, by use of the free index, to determine that the Prossers came in two or more groups in 1903, some coming to Montreal ( Quebec) and some to Halifax. If the enquirer then went further and paid to access transcriptions of the records, the names of the vessels and the departure dates from the British Isles would be readily forthcoming. Having done that, the enquirer could turn to a database of 1865-1922 passenger manifests prepared at the point of arrival of Canada; this is on the website of Library and Archives Canada (LAC), and the search screen is located at http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/passenger/001045-100.01-e.php  . For each voyage of interest, the enquirer should enter the ship's name and the year and port of arrival, and then choose, among the search results, the entry for the voyage which terminated in Canada a week or two after the voyage commenced in the UK. Each page of the manifest could be examined in turn, until the entries for the Prossers are found. In 1903, one would expect each passenger's intended destination to be given, but there may well not be a column – as there would be in later years – giving the name of the railroad on which the journey was to be continued. There may, however, be a general annotation on the first page of such manifest providing a reference to trains to which passengers transferred. It is reasonable to anticipate that the Prossers made their way west by rail.

I began this response with the qualifier “as things stand at the moment”. The LAC and Ancestry.ca have announced a partnership to extend the range of online digitized Canadian passenger lists; to digitize ancillary records such as US to Canada border crossing records and the 1919-1924 Form 30 and Form 30A immigration records (below); and to provide nominal indexes to the whole lot!  At that point, research in Canadian passenger lists will be transformed.”

 

Q2/31/2007. England/Canada.  Albert King came to Canada on the 'Scotian' in June 1913.  Where precisely did he go to live in Canada?  He had returned to England by August 1915.  Are there records of people returning to the UK?

James Thomson writes: “Splendidly, the enquirer has already identified the ship and voyage on which Albert King made the trip to Canada. The information which the enquirer seeks about destination within Canada is most easily sought in the passenger manifest for the same voyage prepared at the point of arrival in Canada. The good news is that a digital image of this manifest is now online; at http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/passenger/001045-100.01-e.php , enter Scotian as the Name of Ship and 1913 as the Year of Arrival. In the list of results which are returned, click on “SCOTIAN” next to the arrival date of June 16, 1913 (this must be the voyage of interest, as the enquirer knows that Albert was a passenger on a voyage which commenced on June 5, 1913). At this point, in theory, one could step through the images of the pages of the manifest until Albert is located, and then inspect the column for his intended destination. Now for the very bad news. Much of the passenger information, at least on the digital version, is virtually completely illegible. The enquirer could try the equivalent microfilm at NYCL (T-4798), but the image there is not much better (and perhaps no better). I'm afraid that one may have to make some guesses here. For instance, there are several passengers at the foot of page 13 who may have the surname King. In each case, the ages and occupations are legible; there are, among others, a 17 year old gardener, a 45 year old carter, and a 24 year old fitter. Do any of these sound like good candidates for Albert? If not, are any of the other legible combinations of ages and occupations, anywhere in the manifest, a good fit? If one can identify a likely entry, then one may be in luck; in almost all cases in this manifest the column in which the intended destination is given is legible as well.

The enquirer's second question relates to eastbound transatlantic passenger manifests, from North America to the British Isles. Just as there is a record series containing westbound passenger lists prepared at the point of embarkation in the United Kingdom (series BT 27 at The National Archives (TNA) at Kew, London, entitled Board of Trade Passenger Lists Outwards, 1890-1960 – the series being indexed and digitized at http://www.ancestorsonboard.com/   ), so there is a record series containing eastbound passenger lists prepared at the point of arrival in the United Kingdom: the Board of Trade Passenger Lists Inwards, 1878-1960, which are held at TNA as series BT 26. As part of its 2005-2011 digitization program, the aim of which is to place digital copies of all of TNA's most popular series online by 2011, TNA has indicated that it hopes to launch a project to digitize and index the (eastbound) BT 26 lists some time this year, with a completion date of 2009. The intent is to attract a partner in the undertaking, as has happened with the BT 27 Passenger Lists Outwards, and indeed a licence respecting the BT 26 series (and related series) is now being negotiated.”

 

Q3/31/2007. England/Canada.  Joseph Ernest Gloster came to Canada in the spring of 1920 on the 'Melita' from Liverpool to Saint John N.B. possibly travelling with a Rose Ann Stacey.  I believe they were making their way to Watrous, Saskatchewan.  How can I verify this?

James Thomson writes: “The LAC database of 1865-1922 passenger lists referred to above does not at this point include arrivals at Saint John in 1920, though in due course indexes to and images of such manifests will be available online (as described above). For the time being, such manifests can be consulted on microfilm at NYCL, but there is another class of records which in this case makes a better starting point. Starting between 1919 and 1922, and lasting until 1924, passengers arriving in Canada can be sought in the immigration Form 30A (Ocean Arrivals) records, as described at http://www.collectionscanada.ca/genealogy/022-908.004-e.html .

The Form 30A records also will in due course be indexed and digitized and available online, but for the time being they can be consulted on microfilm at the NYCL. The records are in quasi-alphabetical order and I am pleased to report that the enquirer will find a record for Joseph Ernest Gloster on film T-15040 (in a section of surnames beginning with Glo...) and will find a record for Rose Ann Stacey on film T-15201 (in a section devoted to the surname Stacey). Both records are highly informative, and I hope will be of the greatest interest to the enquirer, who shouldn't overlook the fact that in each case the image of the “Passenger's Declaration” is preceded on the film by a “Description of Passenger” which forms part of the same record. The enquirer may be able to make a good assessment of whether Joseph Edward (a widower) and Rose Ann (single) were travelling together by comparing their ticket numbers and dates of purchase of such tickets etc..

While at the NYCL, the enquirer can take the matter even further. The Form 30A records make it clear that both Joseph Ernest Gloster and Rose Ann Stacey were passengers on a voyage of the Melita which commenced at Liverpool on March 19, 1920, and arrived at Saint John on March 28, 1920. The passenger manifest for this voyage is available and is split between two films at the NYCL: the first part is the last item on film T-14839 and the second part is the first item on Film T-14840. Joseph Ernest and Rose Ann both are recorded in the second part; he is on a page 32 (as numbered by hand in the top right corner), and she appears a few pages later; the information in each case supplements what is in the Form 30A records. Don't pass over the manifest as a whole too quickly; the first page (of the first part, at the end of film T-14839) provides useful information about the ship and the voyage, and a careful inspection of the entire manifest may disclose other passengers who were heading to Watrous (which you may find mistranscribed in the manifest as Watrons). Happy hunting!”

 

Q4/31/2007.  Widow Bicknell in receipt of parish relief for many years in Binstead, Hampshire but no sign of baptisms or burials of Bicknell's in Binstead.  Since to obtain parish relief she would have to have settlement there why is this and are there suggestions as to where her family might be.  Widow Bicknell might have had settlement in Binstead by being born there and unless you know her maiden name you would be unable to find her baptism.  We note that you have searched baptisms and burials but we think it important that you now search the Binstead marriages which, for the years 1754-1837 are on Film No. 1041228.  This might reveal somebody marrying a Bicknell which could help you find the baptism.  There is a further possibility that Widow Bicknell remarried and this is the reason you are unable to find her burial - or she died outside the parish and was not buried in Binstead.

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 9 August 2007

 

No films have been received this week.

 

 

 

Were you aware..............

 

British India .  Sheila Smith writes:- " I wanted to pass along a new site that is very useful to people researching their family in British India. It's at  http://indiafamily.bl.uk/UI/   and it is a searchable database of the British Library's India Office card index.  The records include Ecclesiastical returns of births, marriages and deaths, army records and biographical info.  It can be searched by name, keyword and presidency, and includes records from the earliest days of the East India Company, to the 1940's." 

I had a look at this website and find that it has 300,000 births, marriages, deaths and burials of British and European people in India between 1600 and 1949.  The site points out that this represents about 10% of the British Library India Office holdings.  Searching for Goddards I got 160 hits - 28 births, 30 baptisms, 43 marriages, 4 deaths, 45 burials and 10 biographical notes but there was some double counting here as a marriage, for example would appear twice - once under the groom's name and once under the bride's.  A very useful site indeed and a useful adjunct to the excellent collection of films on British India we have here in the Toronto Family History Centre.

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 31/2007

 

Many thanks to those people who responded to my request for questions for The Forum as illustrated below.  A constant supply would be nice.

The problems we were having with the email distribution of the Bulletin seem to have been overcome.  We did not have any bounce back to us last week and have had no reports of non-delivery.

Mind you we are not having such a good time with the snail-mail.  Not a single film was received this week.

Next week's counties for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be the 13 counties comprising the principality of Wales.

 

In this Bulletin

Some posers in The Forum for our readers to work on on holiday Monday, when according to tonight's forecast we can expect a lot of rain.

More on convicts, crime and punishment and World War 1 "Unburnt" army records in Were you aware............

 

Announcements

The Toronto Family History Centre will be closed for the Civic Holiday on Saturday 4th August and on Monday 6th August.

The Ontario Genealogical Society Toronto Branch tell us that there is still space available for the Dutch Family History Workshop at the North York Central Library on Saturday, August 11 th.  Information about the workshop, full details about the day’s program and registration form can be found at http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/.

Additions to our Permanent Collections

 

England, Leicestershire , Marriages for the following parishes:

Humberstone 1559-1837, Quorndon 1576-1837,Swithland 1624-1837.

Walton-on-the-Wolds 1568-1837, Wanlip 1563-1837, Woodhouse 1623-1837  (All on CD No. FTM33).

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's counties are the 13 counties that comprised the principality of Wales.

This week's counties are Hampshire and Dorset.  We have had no submissions for Hampshire.  For Dorset, Frances Radford suggests:

http://www.weymouth-dorset.co.uk/ - information on Weymouth, Old Weymouth, Melcombe Regis, History Timelines, the Borough, Local Villages and other related subjects.

 

The Forum

New Questions.  We have three similar questions this week and we believe that we could provide immediate answers to all of them.  However, we would like our readers to send in their ideas and next week we will publish answers which may be of help to those who have not had experience in this area of research.

Q1/31/2007. England/Canada. My grandfather George Prosser came to Canada from England in 1903 with his wife Sarah and their children George Henry, Rowland, Harold, Herbert, Claud and Lily.  They homesteaded in Saskatchewan.  I would like to know what ship they came on and what route they took to Saskatchewan.

Q2/31/2007.  England/Canada. Albert King left England to come to Canada on the 'Scotian' from London on 5 June 1913.  Is there any way of finding out exactly where he went to live in Canada?  By August 1915 he was back in London.  Are there shipping records for people who returned to the U.K.?

Q3/31/2007.  England/Canada. I think my grandfather Joseph Ernest Gloster came to Canada from England on the 'Melita' from Liverpool to Saint John N.B. in the spring of 1920.  His travelling companion may have been Rose Ann Stacey/Stacy.  I believe they were making their way to Watrous, Saskatchewan.  How can I verify this?

 

and a question of a different stripe -

Q4/31/2007.  England.    In researching the parish of Binstead in Hampshire, I have found a Widow Bicknell in receipt of parish relief from December 1807 to November 1825 (a total of 18 years), and another (or the same?) Widow Bicknell from January 1787 to December 1791 (5 years).   However I have been unable to find any record of Bicknell (or any name close) in the parish records of baptisms (1785-1839) or burials (1809-1860).  Given that relief was in the parish of settlement I find this unusual.  Does anyone have any ideas as to where her family might be?

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 2 August 2007.

 

No films have been received in the past 7 days.

 

News from the trenches

 

Following up on the piece in last week's Bulletin on Australian convict records, Chris Roberts writes:

"Some time ago, an Australian born friend recommended a book by Robert Hughes called "The Fatal Shore" .  It was a riveting, well-researched account of the various aspects of transportation from a human and political/historical perspective.  Very readable and more powerful than any novel!
Another good book is called "Bury the Chains" by Adam Horthschild about the abolition movement in Britain to end slavery.  Very readable and informative".

 

Were you aware..................

 

Canada .  Kathy Hartley spotted an article in the National Post concerning Canada's war graves.  www.mapleleaflegacy.com is aiming to provide on-line a photograph of every Canadian war grave.  Checking this out I find that it is based on the information carried on the Commonwealth War Graves site www.cwgc.org and could be considered as an alternative in searching for Canadian war deaths.  They seem to have some way to go before they have a good representation of the actual graves.

 

England .  Crime and Punishment.

In last week's Bulletin we reported that from 1788 to 1868 165,000 people were transported to Australia from England having been convicted of what in many cases was a minor offence.  I have now discovered that that figure represented about one-third of all convictions during that period.

By the early 1800's there were over 200 offences for which the penalty was death by hanging and there is no doubt that transportation was seen as a humane alternative for the lesser offences.  Many of the offences for which death was the prescribed penalty were very similar.  Stealing from a shop, a house, a warehouse or a brothel were all separate offences but the main groups were:

Murder

Attempted Murder

Arson

Rape

Sodomy

Forgery

Uttering (passing counterfeit money)

Coining

Robbery

Highway Robbery (street robbery, now called mugging)

Housebreaking

Robbery in a dwelling house

Returning from transportation

Cutting and maiming (now called grievous bodily harm)

Horse Stealing

Cattle Stealing

Sheep Stealing.

 

By 1861, the offences that demanded the death penalty upon conviction had been reduced to just four - high treason, murder, piracy and arson in a Royal dockyard.

Between 1800 and 1899 3,351 men and 167 women were hanged in England and Wales (roughly 35 per year),  Between 1900 and 1964 when the lasting hanging took place, 748 men and 15 women were hanged (roughly 12 per year).  These figures exclude 18 American servicemen who were executed in England in WW2, 12 for murder and 6 for rape.

In 1965 the homicide rate for England & Wales was 6.8 per million population.  By 1997 this had more than doubled to 14.1 per million population.

 

England/Australia transportation.

In last week's Bulletin I pointed out, somewhat tongue in cheek,  that among the convicts listed as being transported to Australia were two with the surname Billing.  (Helen Billing is a very valuable member of the Toronto Family History staff).  Helen now writes:-"Last week you touched a nerve with your article on transported criminals, citing Billing examples.  As my husband, Alan, exclaimed, it was not his ancestors who were transported but rather my 4g grandfather.  Aaron Chevell was one of 76 people charged in 1816 with rioting and stealing, after riots in Littleport and Ely ostensibly against the high price of grain.  Of these 5 were hung; seven were transported to Australia and another dozen spent a year in Ely "goal".  Aaron had stolen a total of nine pounds. The 7 transportees were jailed in Ely Jail, sent to a convict hulk on the Thames and transported by ship first to Sydney and then to Hobart, Tasmania.  By 1819 the governor recommended that the families of four of these men be sent to Hobart as the men were well able to support their families.  But no action was forthcoming from Cambridge and my 4g-grandfather lived for 40 more years in Hobart, while his wife and four children stayed in Littleport. Thanks to the information on Ancestry I now know that he was pardoned by 1841.

Australians are very keen on finding convicts as ancestors and there is a lot on the internet to help track them down.  If you have a convict ancestor, you can "claim" him or her in order to get in touch with other descendants at http://users.bigpond.net.au/convicts/.  If you wish to know more about convict jargon "tickets of leave", etc, try http://users.bigpond.net.au/convicts/page100.html.  The "Dead Persons Societies" in Australia have good links for finding Australian relatives, for example: Melbourne - http://home.vicnet.net.au/~dpsoc/ or Perth - http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/default.html. Existing Australian censuses (1841,1891 & 1901) do not detail the names and ages of each person but seem to just give the head of household and the distribution of males and females by age in the household.  So it is rather frustrating trying to find my lowly ancestor who was probably never the head of a household.  The Australian information on Ancestry will be a huge help to many people.  Thanks to the Editor for highlighting it last week".

And thank you Helen for the interesting story and for the additional information.

 

First World War British Army Records.

James Thomson writes: "I contributed to Bulletin 08/2007 of February 22, 2007, a note about the launch on Ancestry of indexes to, and digital images of, the First World War WO 364 British Army soldiers' papers (known as the "unburnt documents"), for soldiers whose surnames began with the letters "A" or "B". I'm delighted to see that Ancestry has now completed their WO 364 project by adding indexes to and digital images of such papers for soldiers whose surnames began with the letters "C" through "Z". For more information, see http://content.ancestry.co.uk/iexec/default.aspx?htx=List&dbid=1114 ; this database is freely available to Toronto Public Library (TPL) cardholders at all TPL branches (as part of AncestryLibraryEdition), as well as to Ancestry subscribers with access to the UK & Ireland Collections. (Editor's Note: such access is available through the Family History Centre.) For more detailed information about the WO 364 record series, and the complementary WO 363 ("burnt documents") series, see the Research Guide prepared by The National Archives at

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=18

 

A few brief notes:

 

1. If one finds an index entry of interest, the digital image to which one is taken when one clicks on “View image” should be the front of the first form in the set of records for that soldier; to see the next image, click on the “Next” icon (a right-pointing arrow) immediately above the displayed image. To see the entire set of images for the soldier, continue doing this; the end of the set of papers relating to that soldier  should be indicated by an image of a card reading “Next File”. Don't be surprised if the soldier's papers contain what appear to be duplicate copies of the same form; there may be some subtle differences between them.

Note: I emphasize the words "should be" because both Margaret Taylor and I have noted that it sometimes has been the case (at least with the first tranche of such records, namely those for soldiers whose surnames began with "A" or "B") that (a) the image to which one was taken when one clicked on "View image" was not in fact the first record in the set of records for a particular soldier (meaning that it may also be worth clicking on the "Prev" icon (a left-pointing arrow) immediately above the displayed image of what is ostensibly the first such record for such soldier, just to be sure that there are no records relevant to the soldier before that image); and/or that (b) the "Next File" card was sometimes missing, meaning that one might inadvertently find oneself at some point straying into the series of records for the next soldier in the sequence.

Note that both WO 364 and the larger series WO 363 (the "burnt documents") contain the papers of non-commissioned officers and "other ranks" only; the records of commissioned officers are not included.

 

2. The estimates of the number of soldiers (NCOs and "other ranks") in the British Army in the First World War range up to 7 million (or more), and there are said to be records for about 750,000 of these in WO 364 and records for about 2 million in WO 363; in consequence, it is generally said that there are extant soldiers' papers for about 40% of those who served (papers for the other 60% having been destroyed by fire as a result of bombing in the Second World War).

 

As I noted on the earlier occasion, Ancestry also intends to index and digitally image the two million sets of records in the WO 363 ("burnt documents") series, and to complete that task by the end of 2008: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/stories/150.htm?homepage=news    It has been estimated that, when complete,  there may be a total of about fourteen million digital images in the WO 363 and WO 364 databases!

 

3. Not included in either WO 363 or WO 364 are the records of soldiers who remained in the British Army after 1920 (or who re-enlisted prior to the Second World War); such records are with the Ministry of Defence.

 

It is worth noting also that records of those who served in (or, to be more precise, whose service ended with) the Household Cavalry are not in WO 363 or WO 364, but rather are in TNA series WO 400. Further, the records of those who served with the Grenadier Guards, Coldstream Guards, or Scots, Irish or Welsh Guards remain with the regimental headquarters of the Foot Guards regiments and hence do not comprise any series at the TNA. This is important for me, for instance, as the Coldstream Guards are one of the regiments in which my family members served. The records of the Household Cavalry should all be available, while the records of the Foot Guards did suffer some losses in the Second World War.

 

For such First World War service records of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps as survive (only about 7,000 out of the original 57,000), see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/waac.asp, and for First World War service records of men as well as officers of the Royal Naval Division (not the Royal Navy), see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/royalnavaldivision.asp ."

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 30/2007

 

A reminder that we require a constant supply of questions for The Forum and interesting stories and comments for News from the trenches.  Next week's counties for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be Hampshire and Dorset.

 

 

In this Bulletin

An unusual entry under Announcements whereby we give our readers the opportunity of acquiring a car at a bargain price.

We draw your attention to convict records in Were you aware..............

Announcements

Our Mission Office has a number of used vehicles to dispose of at bargain prices.  They have five 4-door automatic  Chevrolet Cavaliers - two 2003 models and three 2004 models all with Air Conditioning and AM/FM radios. They have around 80,000km on their clocks and all are priced at $7,500.  There is also a 2005 model Chevrolet Uplander SUV with approx. 90,000km clocked, priced at $14,950.  All these vehicles have been well maintained, have full service histories and will come with certificates of roadworthiness.  First come, first served.  Contact Elder Nicol at the Mission Office on 416 490 6869.

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's counties will be Hampshire and Dorset.  Your submissions are invited.

 

This week's counties are Kent and Surrey.  Nobody has submitted sites for Surrey but several of our readers have made suggestions for Kent.  We have eliminated duplications and combined comments and descriptions.

 

http://kentarchaeology.org.uk/  - Kent Archaeological Society -  the oldest and largest society devoted to the history and archaeology of the ancient county of Kent. This site has a fine Research section which includes: Maps, place names, MI's and photographs, as well as Tithe Award Schedules and Wills. Not just archaeology!

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mrawson/  - an excellent resource for genealogy in the County of Kent, England.It includes many indexes and transcripts containing over 80,000 names and over 350 links to other useful sites.

http://cityark.medway.gov.uk/  - the web presence of the Medway Council Archives Service which is based at the Medway Archives and Local Studies Centre, Civic Centre, Strood, Kent, England. They preserve and make available for research the archives of the Medway area of Kent and also the parish records of north-west Kent. The oldest records date from 604

www.kfhs.org.uk/  Kent Family History Society

http:// freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~penney/    Sheerness and Isle of Sheppey census, PR and other interesting information

www.rootsweb.com/~engken/bmd.html  Listing of transcribed Kent births, marriages and deaths

http://extranet3.kent.gov.uk/sp/rois/home.html    Online indexes of Kent BMDs from 1837-2002

 

The Forum

New Question

Q1/30/2007.  Canada.  On the ships manifest for my maternal grandfather coming to Canada in 1927, it has as his final destination "L.I.B. Winnipeg".  Does anyone know what this means?

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 26 July 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 23 August 2007.

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN ONT Bruce Co Marriages 1925

2412461

CAN ONT Leeds & Grenville Co Mar 1925

2413313

CAN ONT Waterloo Co Marriages 1925

2413331

CAN PQ Land petitions

1630572

ENG LAN L'pool St Nicholas PRs M 1808-21

0093840

ENG LAN L'pool St Peters PRs C 1815-1820

0093874

ENG WIL Trowbridge Marr 1822-1971

1279314

GER Urloffen Baden pr

0949966

IRL DOW Dromore 1911 Census

2092684

IRL DOW Dromore 1911 Census

2092683

JAM Kingston pr 1722-1871

1291761

JAM Ver pr 1707-1869

1291677

POL Stendsitz RC PR Bapt 1835-1890

0544864

USA MI Dec of Intention Indx 1859-1941

1320185

USA MI Naturalization Indx 1894-1931

1787479

USA NY Manhattan - AD12 Census 1905

1433088

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

 

News from the trenches

 

England , Abney Park Cemetery.  In last week's Favourite UK Counties section we referred to the records of Abney Park Cemetery which is in the Stoke Newington/Stamford Hill area of north London.  Helen Billing writes:-

" Visiting Abney Park to search for our ancestors for whom we had burial cards was a bit of a shock.  It is now Abney Park Nature Reserve and Conservation Area.  Our hunt for the tombstones of our ancestors was futile as most of the stones are covered with ivy, fallen over, under broken trees, and completely illegible.  We had obtained the burial numbers, like I-7456, from our burial cards and the Abney Park Cemetery website but these were not useful as all the "I's" were not together.  However it was very beautiful and a great place to wander on a sunny afternoon.

The cemetery was established in 1840 as a garden cemetery, a semi-public arboretum and an educational institute.  It is large - 32 acres.  The trees planted for the arboretum have matured and even fallen over.  This is now a lovely green area with much wildlife, including lots of birds and butterflies (especially considering the surrounding parts of London).

A few stones are legible and well kept - the founders of the Salvation Army, William & Catherine Booth, and other Salvation Army Commissioners have large memorial stones.  No interments have taken place since 1980, except when the family has previously held a plot there".

England/Australia.  Your editor writes:  In the course of my research into the Australian convict records, I came across a Charles Billing who was sentenced in 1823 at the Old Bailey to 7 years transportation for stealing some lead and a Joseph Billing who was sentenced on 5 March 1823 at the Bedford Assize to transportation for life. I don't know what his crime was.  Joseph sailed for Australia on 29 July 1823 on the " Asia" arriving early in 1824.  Twenty years later,on 1 May 1844 he was recommended for an Absolute Pardon "having held a conditional pardon beyond the usual time and his conduct being favourably reported".  He had held a conditional pardon for 6 years.  There were 42 Goddards listed in the Australian convict records.

 

Were you aware.................

 

England/Australia.  From 1788 to 1868 165,000 convicts were transported to Australia mainly from England but a few were picked up in the West Indies by the convict ships on their way to Australia.  The voyage from England to Australia usually took between 4 and 6 months depending on how many stops were made on the way for stores and repairs.  Recently added to the Ancestry.com website (available free of charge at the Toronto Family History Centre and in Toronto Public Libraries) is a searchable database of these convicts showing their names, where and when they were convicted (but does not indicate the crime), the length of their sentence and the name of the ship on which they were transported together with the sailing date.  The date of the arrival in Australia is not shown. 

Besides the Convict Transportation Registers this area of the Ancestry.com site contains other databases - Convict Musters 1806-1849 (these are like a census to discover who was living in the colony) which, in some cases, shows the year of birth, Convict Pardons 1834-1859 and the Convict Lists 1787-1834.  A Conditional Pardon allowed a convict to work for someone outside the prison system or even to set up a business (but not to leave the country) whereas if a convict was granted an Absolute Pardon he (or she) was free to return to England.  Some saved enough money after they were granted a Conditional Pardon to enable them to pay their fare back whilst others worked their passage. (An indication of the material that can be gleaned from these records is shown in News from the trenches (above).

 

England .  Benefit of Clergy   and the Neck Verse

Benefit of Clergy was the privilege originally extended to clergy so that they might avoid the severity of English criminal law when hanging was the standard penalty for numerous offences.  Later, the right to claim Benefit of Clergy was broadened so that anyone who could read was entitled to claim it.  The loophole (noose-hole?) became wider since the standard test applied by the Courts was the ability to read verse 1 of Psalm 51.

 

Have mercy upon me, O God

According to thy loving kindness

According unto the multitude of thy tender mercies

Blot out my transgressions

 

Of course it didn't take long before the illiterate among the criminal classes learned this verse by heart and thus it became known as The Neck Verse.

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Toronto Family History Bulletin 29/2007

 

It seems we are not alone in having problems getting bulk email delivered.  Dick Eastman, who sends out a daily on-line genealogy newsletter and uses a bulk-mail service to do it, apparently has the same problems with a significant percentage of subscribers not receiving his messages.  He says that this is common to all bulk email and there is no way around it.

 

Next week's counties for the UK Favourite County Sites section will be Surrey and Kent.  Your submissions are invited. And we could do with some questions for The Forum and interesting stories for News from the trenches.

 

In this Bulletin

News from the trenches reveals the difficult birth of the London County Council

In the Were you aware.......... section, James Thomson provides us with further details concerning the Crimean and Second Afghan War medal rolls.

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's counties will be Surrey and Kent.

 

Middlesex was a county we covered in Bulletin 26/2007 but we now have a further submission.  Maurice Hardman tell us that http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~abneypark/abneyy.html has a searchable database of burials at the Abney Park Cemetery which is in the Hackney area.

 

This week's counties are Worcestershire, Shropshire and Herefordshire.  We have not received any submissions for Worcestershire but Sheila Smith sent us the following for Herefordshire:`

http://www.rootsweb.com/~ukhfhs/  The Herefordshire Family History Society.
http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/fines/herefordshire.shtml  Herefordshire Feet of Fines:(abstracts from 1359 -1509)
http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/HEF/ProbateRecords/  The Wills of Herefordshire;
http://www.smr.herefordshire.gov.uk/  Historic Herefordshire Online:(includes a searchable database of land owners)
and Vida Preece offered some more:

http://www.genealogylinks.net/uk/england/herefordshire/index.html  Herefordshire Genealogy Links, provides links to lots of other useful Herefordshire sites

http://www.genealogy-of-uk.com/England/Herefordshire/genealogy.htm Herefordshire Genealogy site

Here's one for Shropshire:

http://www.genealogylinks.net/uk/england/shropshire/index.html  Shropshire Genealogy Links, provides lots of links to useful Shropshire sites

 

The Forum

 

Answers to Previous Questions

 

Q1/28/2007.  Genealogy generally.  Where can I buy a pair of gloves suitable for handling valuable archival material?   We received numerous replies to this question - for which many thanks.  Our readers think that cotton gloves purchased from Shopper's Drug are as good as any but you could also buy them on-line from Global Genealogy on http://www.globalgenealogy.com/  

Q2/28/2007.  Canada.  What does "British Bonus Allowed" mean on a Passenger List for a ship arriving in Canada ?  Jeannette Colgan writes to tell us that the answer to this question can be found on http://www.collectionscanada.ca/genealogy/022-908.001-e.html and is defined  " A commission paid by the Canadian government's Immigration Branch to steamship booking agents in the United Kingdom for each suitable immigrant who purchased a ticket to sail to Canada. The immigrants themselves did not receive a bonus."

Q3/28/2007.  England WW1.  No one seems to have seen the campaign medals of a relative who died in WW1, to which I know he was entitled.  Is there a source where I can obtain the medals or even miniatures?   Beryl Peros went to a lot of trouble to respond to this one having already obtained, in 2001, a WW2 medal to which her father was entitled from the Army Medal Office in Droitwich Spa, Worcestershire. She discovered that the medal office is now the responsibility of the Ministry of Defence in Gloucester but having phoned them was told that they are no longer issuing WW1 medals and the only source would be from a medal dealer. And Mary Parry writes: "My mother used Toad Hall Medals in Devon to get her father's medals from WWI. You will need your relative's regimental number and full name.  They are now incorporated into Bigbury Medals see http://www.toadhallmedals.com/#605X0  "

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 19 July 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 16 August 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN PQ Grenville church records

1430826

CAN PQ Grenville St. Matthew's cemetery

1711400

CAN PQ Grenville St. Matthew's pr

1992751

CAN PQ Montreal St George BMB 1843-

1430788

ENG HUN Great Paxton pr 1583-1876

1040745

ENG NBL Newcastle St John's PR 1825-

0847920

ENG SAL Ellesmere Wills & Adm 1636-1858

0095264

ENG SAL Ellesmere Wills & Adm 1636-1858

0095257

ENG SOM Corfe PRs 1566 - 1936

1526553

IND Madras BMB V.17-19 1834-1840

0521842

IND Madras BMB V.2-3 1784-1808

0463296

IND Madras BMB V.7-8 1818-1823

0521837

ITL Brindisi F'villa Fontana CivR 1809-

1329884

SCT PER Perth OPR Marr 1784-1799

1040158

SCT KKD Kells PRs

1067975

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches.

England .  London.  Formation of the London County Council and a rogue Goddard

The Metropolitan Board of Works (MBW) was created in 1855 responsible for developing the infrastructure of a rapidly expanding London and was for a number of years the only London-wide adminstrative body.  Eventually a series of scandals brought about its demise and the creation of the London County Council comprising 28 metropolitan boroughs.  In 1879 the MBW purchased the Old Pavilion Music Hall in Piccadilly Circus apparently needed for the construction of Shaftesbury Avenue.  As the road plans were in an early stage the site was leased to an R.E. Villiers but in addition to his lease payments he was making regular payments to the Chief Valuer of the MBW, a certain Frederick William Goddard.  In 1883 a more permanent lease was signed with Villiers for £3,000 per annum despite there being an offer of £4,000 per annum from another party.  In 1886 Villiers sold the Pavilion and Goddard received £5,000 of the proceeds.  The MBW became known as the "Metropolitan Board of Perks". In  1888 Parliament established a Royal Commission to look into the MBW and recommended its abolition and the formation of the London County Council. Meanwhile the MBW continued on its corrupt way and despite being asked not to take any important decisions refused to take notice and announced that they were about to award contracts for the construction of the Blackwall Tunnel.  Faced with this Parliament took immediate action, abolished the MBW and the London County Council came into being on 21 March 1889.

 

Were you aware.................

 

England - Crimean War Medals 1854-1855 and Afghan War Medals 1878-1880.

In last week's Bulletin we responded to a question from Paul Branson asking whether it was possible to bring in CDs from Salt Lake.  We advised that this was not possible but that these particular CDs were available for purchase from a supplier in the UK.

Paul tells us that he has ordered the CDs and that when he is finished with them he will be donating them to the Family History Centre.  This is marvelous news and we are most grateful. On this same topic James Thomson writes:

 

"The news that Mr. Branson will consider donating the CDs containing digital images of the medal rolls for the Crimean War and for the Second Afghan War is splendid; these would be most welcome additions to the resources available for British Army research in Toronto. Here are some thoughts relating to these items:

 

The Baltic Medal Roll, 1854-1855 CD from the same vendor would complement the Crimea War Medal Roll CD wonderfully, should the FHC be considering acquiring it.

 Using the CDs containing digital images of these medal rolls may require some patience on the part of the researcher: they do not include nominal indexes; they are browseable rather than text-searchable; and some pages of the manuscript lists of recipients may be easier to read than others.

As regards nominal indexes, Brian Oldham had been constructing the Great Crimean War Index, a searchable database of participants; I hope to provide information about its status next week (the relevant site, www.crimeanwar.info, is not currently operational). For the Second Afghan War, The Afghan War Database Project at www.angloafghanwar.info may be of interest; it so far includes 770 entries.

Published casualty rolls for both wars are at the Toronto Reference Library (TRL): see Casualty Roll for the Crimea (TRL Stacks: 947.07 C585) and Second Afghan War 1878-1880 Casualty Roll (TRL Stacks: 958.103 F13).

For a review of the range of medals awarded with respect to the Crimean War, see the website of the Crimean War Research Society at www.crimeanwar.org and in particular the “Crimean War FAQ”. Published books (and Army Lists) referred to there can be sought at the TRL; for issues of the London Gazette see www.gazettes-online.co.uk .

The University of Toronto now subscribes to a text-searchable database of the (British) House of Commons Parliamentary Papers; the Papers include reports (in 1860 and 1871) from the Royal Patriotic Fund providing information about assistance provided to widows and orphans of Crimean War participants (and about petitions for assistance which had been rejected). Other Parliamentary Papers include, for example, lists of officers and men who received medals for Crimean War service from the King of Sardinia.

For recipients of the Afghan War Medal who served in Indian regiments, rather than in the British Army, it may be necessary to consult medal rolls in the records of the India Office, at the British Library.The relevant India Office Military Department series are L/MIL/5/117 to L/MIL/5/124. "

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 28/2007

 

The email gods smiled on us last week.  The Bulletin did not bounce back from any of the over 400 addresses we send it to.  What we don't know is whether all those people received it.  Would anybody who did not receive it let us know.

We have had no responses to our call for websites for the counties of Worcestershire, Shropshire and Herefordshire for the UK Favourite County Sites section so we are keeping this open for another week.  Surely there is somebody researching these counties.

 

In this Bulletin

A very lengthy response to a Forum question  but we thought it well worthwhile copying as it is likely to help all Alberta researchers.

And interesting stuff in the Were you aware......... section on Medal Rolls and Passenger Lists

 

Announcements

Richard Holzapfel, Ph.D., Professor of Church History and Doctrine at Brigham Young University is giving a talk Why the Book of Mormon is the Word of God - Internal Evidences of Its Antiquity at the Church, here at Don Mills and Eglinton, on Saturday, July 14 at 7.00.  Non church members are welcome.

Favourite UK County Sites

 

As we received no submissions for the counties of Worcestershire, Shropshire and Herefordshire we are letting this run for another week.  Hopefully we will have something to report for next week.

 

The Forum

 

Answer to Previous Question

Q1/27/2007.  Canada. Obituary of May 1918 mentioned a son, Henry Lorne Carter as living in Champion, Alberta.  How do I find out what happened to him?

To help us answer this question we enlisted the support of Alberta's Ask a Question service provided by libraries in Alberta and were delighted to receive within 48 hours, the following response:

" Please note that Champion is part of a rural area in Alberta. A local history worth noting about the Champion area,
and the Carter surname, is available on the Internet at: Our Future, Our Past - Alberta Heritage Digitization
Project http://www.ourfutureourpast.ca/loc_hist/page.aspx?id=3523389   "Cleverville-Champion, 1905-1970: A History of Champion and Area", by Cleverville Pioneer Club History BookCommittee, page 265, 3rd paragraph. This only denotes that there is a presence of a Carter Family in the Champion area. I suggest the following contacts to further your quest:
Champion Public Library
Contact: Patty Abel, Librarian
Box 177 / 2 Avenue South
Champion, Alberta T0L 0R0
Tel: (403) 897-3099
Fax: (403) 897-3099  Email: libcha@chinookarch.ab.ca

Provincial Archives of Alberta (PAA)
8555 Roper Road
Edmonton Alberta T6E 5W1
Tel (780) 427-1750
Fax (780) 427-4646 Email paa@gov.ab.ca    
http://www.cd.gov.ab.ca/preserving/paa_2002/inquiries.asp

By getting the assistance of a family historian or genealogist available at the PAA, you should be able to tap
into municipal voter's list and tax records to decipher Henry Lorne Carter's time line.
Alberta Family Histories Society - Cemtery Look-up
http://www.afhs.ab.ca/data/cemeteries/search.php
- no results for Henry Lorne (or L.) Carter
May I also suggest contacting the: Alberta Genealogical Society Research Services Committee
Alberta Genealogical Society
116, 10440 - 108 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta
T5H 3Z9 Canada
Telephone: 780-424-4429
Fax: 780-423-8980
Email: research2@abgensoc.ca
Website: http://abgensoc.ca/research.html

and the Alberta Family Histories Society for further help.

Alberta Family Histories Society
712 - 16 Avenue NW
Calgary, AB T2M 0J8
(403) 214-1447 (voice mail)
Website: http://www.afhs.ab.ca/

Newspapers for the Champion area:

"Alberta Newspapers: An Historical Directory, 1880-1982", by Gloria M. Strathern, pp. 60-61, is another valuable source. Champion had five (5) newspaper titles:

Champion Spokesman, 29 Apr 1914-1914, weekly, no issues located
Champion Weekly, 1917-1919(?), weekly, no issues located
Champion News, 1919-1920(?), weekly, no issues located
Champion Chronicle, 1 Jun 1919-13 Nov 1941, weekly
Chronicle, 20 Nov 1941-25 Mar 1943, weekly

- the later two newspaper are located at the Alberta Legislature Library, Edmonton, Alberta from 21 Oct 1920-5 May 1921; 2 Jul 1925-25 Mar 1943 - these newspapers can be brought in on inter-library loanto the nearest public library, please see their librarian for instructions and costs (if any).
Alberta Legislature Library    

216 Legislature Building
10800 - 97th Avenue
  Edmonton, AB
  T5K 2B6
 E-mail: library.requests@assembly.ab.ca
 Phone: (780) 427-2473
 FAX: (780) 427-6016
 Website: http://www.assembly.ab.ca/lao/library/index.htm "

 

Although their reply was lengthy we thought it worthwhile copying it in extenso as the information contained therein is no doubt of value to all Alberta researchers.  We have conveyed our appreciation.



New Questions

 

Q1/28/2007  Genealogy generally.  Where can I buy a pair of gloves suitable for handling valuable archival material?

Q2/28/2007.  Canada.    My relatives arrived in Canada in 1907, on the SS Ottawa of the Dominion Line, sailing from Liverpool to Quebec City.  Many of the entries on the passenger list have a stamp that reads "British Bonus Allowed".  I have never been able to find out what this means.  Was it a subsidy paid by the British government to encourage emigration, or a company specific discount?  Whatever it was, my ancestors did not receive the "British Bonus"

Q3/28/2007 England, WW1.  I have a relative who died in the First World War, but no one seems to have ever seen his service medals.  I have the medal card file and know he was entitled to the 1915 Star, Victory and British Medal.  Would these have been sent to the family posthumously?  We do have the bronze " Dead Mans Penny", which was issued specifically for a death.  Is there a source where you can reorder medals, or even miniatures, for a charge?

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 12 July 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 9 August 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

BRB Marr Index V.101 1889

1158018

BRB Marr Index V.104 1890

1158021

ENG NFK Welney Accounts & Certificates

1040569

ENG NFK Welney BMDs - 1786

1040559

ENG NFK Welney BMDs 1755 - !876

1040568

ENG YKS Pickhill PRs 1571 - 1880

0468126

ENG YKS Sandhutton BTs 1602 - 1874

0918433

ENG YKS Thirsk BTs 1600 - 1864

0918432

IND Madras Eccl. Recs BMB 1860-1861

0521851

IRL ANT Killead 1901 Census

1952257

IRL LDY Templemore 1901 census

0819485

JAM Wills 1756 - 1930

1937930

NLD Amsterdam Marriages Jan-July 1817

0113660

POL Stendsitz RC PR BMD 1692-1846

0072746

POL Stendsitz RC PR BMD 1839-1858

1618608

RUS BES Borodino deaths 1873-1898

1198719

RUS BES Borodino PR 1817-1855

1766542

SCT INV Sleat PRs 1813 - 1853

0990672

SVK Velka Lomnica PR 1784-1944

1791933

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches

 

Paul Branson writes:

Family tree researchers are well used to being content with progress in baby steps.  It is then, a rare and sublime moment when something really important appears, when you're not even looking for it.  As a teenager my grandmother gave me an old pocket watch, which was inscribed on the inside "to James Bancroft...... for Bravery in the Crimean War"  No one knew if this was a family relative, or if the watch may have been merely bought at a pawn shop.  One day I was copying marriage indexes for siblings in my G-G-G-Grandfathers family, and when accessing the "show others on same page" feature, there was the name of James Bancroft who had married one of his sisters!!   There is an entry in a book I had read on the Battle of Inkermann in the Crimean war, which describes his involvement.  James was struggling with two Russian soldiers, one on the ground holding his feet, and another attempting to bayonet him.  He had to viciously kick away the man on the ground in order to deal with the more immediate threat from above.  Obviously he survived, but later received the stern rebuke from his sergeant  "Bancroft, don't kick a man when he's down!!!"

 

Were you aware................

 

England - Crimea War Medals 1854-1855 and Afghan War Medals 1878-1880. Obviously following up from his research as illustrated above, and having found in the Family History Library Catalog that Salt Lake has CDs containing these medal rolls, Paul Branson wrote to ask if it were possible to bring in these CDs in the same way that we borrow films from Salt Lake.  Well the answer is no, we can bring in only microfilms and microfiche.  It is not possible to order books and CDs from Salt Lake.  However, looking into the possibility that we could buy these CDs, I found that these, and a host of other CDs - parish records, school records, medal rolls, records of actors and actresses etc. are published by (to me anyway) a little known concern called YesterYears Genealogy whose website www.yesteryearsgen.com is well worth looking at.  The Crimea Medal CD contains the scanned images of 6,980 pages and costs £9.99 while the Afghan Medal CD has 1,660 pages scanned and costs £19.99.  Both prices are plus postage.  Readers views on whether we should acquire these for the FHC would be appreciated.

 

USA , New York Inbound Passengers 1820-1846.  John Mahler draws my attention to the existence of fully indexed lists of passengers arriving in New York between 1820 and 1846.  These have been filmed by the LDS on 103 films commencing Film No. 0350204.  Search the Family History Library Catalog on www.familysearch.org inserting this number on the Film/Fiche Number search to locate the actual film containing your ancestors.

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 27/2007

 

Remember, your submissions for the News from the trenches and the Were you aware........ sections of the Bulletin are always welcome.

Next week's Counties for the UK Favourite County Sites section will be Worcestershire, Shropshire and Herefordshire.

 

In this Bulletin

Some amusing tales of marriages in the Carlisle area of northern England in News from the trenches and

News of church records for Armagh, Ireland becoming available on-line, another tranche of passengers leaving UK ports from 1920-1929, further British Phone Book listings becoming available and an offer of free genealogical software all brought to you in Were you aware...............

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's Counties will be Worcestershire, Shropshire and Herefordshire.

 

This week's Counties are Northumberland, Durham, Cumberland and Westmorland.

 

Annie Massey offers the following:

http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/longtown19/index.html  provides a fascinating insight to 19th Century life in Longtown, Cumberland from extracts from the Carlisle Journal and Carlisle Patriot (see examples in News from the trenches)

http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/longtown20/index.html  contains a good number (but not all) cemetery inscriptions
from Arthuret parish (which includes Longtown) and selected family inscriptions of other local parishes.

And Ian Robson offers:

http://www.ndfhs.org.uk/ Very useful site and you really should be a member of the NDFHS (Northumberland Durham Family History Society) if only to get their quarterly journal!

http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/index/DUR-NBL

http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/index/NORTHUMBRIA/2007-06

Both these Rootsweb lists, which really cover the same territory, are quite active and have many knowledgeable members.

http://www.keystothepast.info/k2p/usp.nsf/pws/keys+to+the+Past+-+home+page Covers archeological and historical buildings and monuments & has photos.

http://www.genealogylinks.net/uk/england/northumberland/ As the name implies, Genealogy Links is a list of about two dozen sites useful for Northumberland research.

http://www.redmire.net/lookup/nbl.html Is a list of volunteers willing to do lookups for specific areas.

http://communities.northumberland.gov.uk/ A great site I’ve used a lot for historical research of towns. Lots of old photos there as well.

http://www.tomorrows-history.com/ Regional local studies site for northeastern England I use for finding, among other things, old maps

http://www.newcastle.gov.uk/core.nsf/a/dfcdeathshistorical#perfsearch A bit limited, but Newcastle has births (1837-1870) and marriages (1837-1900) on line and you might get lucky.

And Margaret Taylor gives us:

http://www.tyneandweararchives.org.uk/ Tyne & Wear Archives Service is the record office for the cities and metropolitan districts of Newcastle upon Tyne, Sunderland, Gateshead, South Tyneside and North Tyneside. Documents relating to the area from the 12th to the 21st century, and the service is free for everyone to use.
http://www.ndfhs.org.uk/Articles/index.html Northumberland & Durham Family History Society. Interesting & helpful articles from the NDFHS Journal
http://www.durhamrecordsonline.com/index.php  Number of records currently available: 2,200,863
NEW:
Index to 15,122 Baptisms at: Birtley:1850-1851, Birtley (St. Joseph Roman
Catholic):1810-1840, Chester-le-Street:1809-1851, Chester-le-Street
Congregational:1813-1837, Pelton:1843-1851, Witton Gilbert:1810-1851
Marriages at Hartlepool St. Hilda's 1714-1900
http://flambard.dur.ac.uk/dynaweb/handlist/
Durham University Library -Archives & Special Collections
http://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/library/asc/misc/genealogy-DULASC.pdf
A Brief Guide to chief series of records of genealogical interest in Durham University Lib Archives & Special Collections
http://familyrecords.dur.ac.uk/nei/  Durham and Northumberland probate records, 1540-1857
http://www.genealogylinks.net/uk/england/durham/index.html  Durham Genealogy Links| Censuses | Cemeteries | Marriages | Military | Passenger Lists | Parish Registers
http://www.joinermarriageindex.com/pjoiner/genuki/DUR/
Genuki - Durham

 

 

The Forum

 

New Question

Q1/27/2007.  Canada.  I am searching for information about Henry Lorne Carter.  Lorne was born on August 19, 1880 in the County of Huron, Town of Clinton Ontario. His father Henry Carter died May 16, 1918 in Clinton Ontario. Henry Carter's obituary mentioned his son Henry Lorne Carter living in Champion Alberta.  What happened to Lorne?

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 5 July, 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 2 August, 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

ENG SSX Newhaven PR 1754-1881

1067272

ENG WOR Tenbury pr

0992549

ENG YKS Luddenden PR 1653-1811

1542110

IND Madras BMB 1886-1887.

0521874

IND Madras BMB 1888

0463300

IND Madras BMB V.27 1848

0521846

ITL Pachino Civ Recs 1900-1910

1915695

JAM St Ann Parish BMD 1765-

1291703

NLD Sibbe-Mthly Bulletin NLD Gen.1941-

1053155

RUS BES Borodino births 1881-1903 LS

1198714

RUS BES Borodino births 1881-1903 RS

1198713

USA MA Deaths 1921-1925

0954727

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches

 

England , Cumberland.    Marriage report from the Carlisle Journal of September 20, 1823 (see site mentioned above in Favourite UK County Sites):

"At Arthuret on Monday last, Edward Finley, who had been a soldier in the Guards above 18 years. The hardy veteran disdained to march without music; of course a fiddler (that had never fiddled before) walked before the happy pair, who on their return from church received the clamorous salutations of nearly all the children in the town. The valiant son of Mars, who never turned his back upon an enemy, dared not to face this novel and noisy attack, but took to flight, leaping hedges and ditches, leaving his fair bride to trudge home, preceded, if not by music, at least by a man carrying a fiddle."
And from the Carlisle Patriot of September 18, 1841:

"At Gretna, on Sunday week, Mr William Morrison of Longtown, the celebrated author, orator and wrestler, to Miss Martha Tweddle, Lodging House Keeper of Brampton. This is the fifth time Mr Morrison has been married".

 

Were you aware..................

 

James Thomson writes:

I contributed the following to the May 17, 2007 Bulletin 20/2007

" Ireland: Last week, the Irish Family History Foundation, which coordinates the county-based genealogical research centres in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, signed an agreement with a technology company to launch pay-per-use online access to the databases held by the centres: http://www.irish-roots.net/view-details.asp?NewsID=66. Note the last few lines of the announcement: "This is the most exciting development in Irish genealogy since the county centres began indexing records in the late 1980s. The first centres will be online later this month. Watch this space for further information.  Please sign up to our mailing list if you wish to be advised when new data is added to the pay Per View system." A suggestion: in the meantime, don't overlook certain existing online indexes comprising the Central Signposting Index: http://www.irishgenealogy.ie/csi/csi_main.cfm. Two other examples of the same type (in that they are the product of bodies which have been part of the same program) are DublinHeritage.ie (limited data) (http://www.dublinheritage.ie/) and the databases of the Ulster Historical Foundation (Antrim and Down): http://www.ancestryireland.com/database.php   ."

The first of the new databases have now been uploaded; these are for Armagh and can been reached at http://armagh.brsgenealogy.com/. For more information, see http://www.irish-roots.net/view-details.asp?NewsID=68.

 

James also points out:

United Kingdom   Another decade (1920-1929) of BT 27 overseas passenger lists departing from ports in the United Kingdom has just been added to the online database: www.ancestorsonboard.com As noted in the news bulletin, in the 1920s the passenger's last address in the United Kingdom began to be added to the information which was recorded.   

United Kingdom  Ancestry has just added a third tranche ("release") of data to its British Phone Books, 1880-1984 database, which is descibed at: http://content.ancestry.co.uk/iexec/?htx=List&dbid=1025 . This database is included in AncestryLibraryEdition, which is freely available to all Toronto Public Library (TPL) cardholders at all TPL branches and at the Toronto Family History Centre.

And we hear:-

Genealogy.  Findmypast.com at www.findmypast.com announced today that they are supplying, free of charge, a genealogy software programme.  They say "  Family Tree Builder has been developed by leading US genealogy firm PedigreeSoft and is designed to be intuitive and easy for beginners but also sophisticated enough for even the most advanced of family historians.  This new and innovative software allows you to start building a tree from scratch, or upload your existing one from any family tree programme. And because it's online, you can use it anywhere".

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 26/2007

 

Our email problems continue.  Last week the Yahoo.ca addresses did not bounce back - as they normally do - but the Yahoo.com ones did and whereas when we send the yahoo.ca out again, not as blind copies, they go through, the Yahoo.com ones again bounced.  Having looked into it further it seems we need to purchase some specialist software which would send the Bulletin out personalised to every subscriber but I think we would be a bit reluctant to spend our funds in this way.

 

I could do with some help in compiling these Bulletins.  If you have an interesting story for News from the trenches or can throw some light on a little known source for Were you aware......... section, then please let me have them.

 

Next weeks counties for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be Northumberland, Durham, Cumberland and Westmorland.

 

In this Bulletin

A give-away book in Announcements

Some discussion on the curmudgeon minister of Hawick in News from the trenches

A Society for you to join for all those readers who can identify a rogue - a real rogue - among your ancestors in Were you aware............

 

Announcements

Canada Day Closing.  The Family History Centre will be closed on Saturday, June 30 and Monday July 2.

Freebie.  Thanks to a donation we have two copies of a hard cover book  - "The Oxford Guide to Family History" - so we are giving away the spare copy.  First come, first served.

Additions to our Permanent Collection

 

We are pleased to report the following additions, generously donated.

 

England & Wales.    Book "Discovering your Family History" by Don Steel.

England , Somerset, Martock.  Book.  "The Martock Genealogist" by Roy Maber.

Ireland .  Book.  "Irish Genealogy - A Record Finder" by Donal F. Begley.

United Kingdom .  Book.  "Naval Records for Genealogists" Published by The Public Record Office.

India .    Book. "The Records of the East India College, Haileybury" by Anthony Farrington.

Canada .  Book.  "Checklist of Parish Registers 1981".  Published by Public Archives Canada.

Canada , Quebec, Beaumont.  Book.  "Baptisms of Saint Etienne 1692-1985"  by Rosaire Saint-Pierre.

Canada , Ontario, Northumberland County.  Book.  "Wesleyan Methodist Baptisms Registers 1834-1902" by Linda Corupe.

Canada , Quebec, Saint-Severe. Book.  "Marriages 1856-1978".  Published by Societe de Genealogie, Trois Rivieres.

Canada , Ontario, Frontenac County.     Book. "Wesleyan Methodist Baptism Registers 1835-1902" by Linda Corupe.

Canada , Ontario, Ernestown.  Book.  "The Anglican Registers of Rev. John Langhorn 1787-1814".  Published by the OGS, Kingston Branch.

Canada , Ontario, Portland Township.  Book.  " Portland Township Census 1861"  Published by the OGS, Kingston Branch.

Canada , Ontario, St Catharines.  Book.  "Sincerely Lamented, St. Catharines Obituaries 1817-1918"  by Paul Hutchinson.

 

And also:

England , Shropshire, St. Martin.  Monumental Inscriptions of St. Martin of Tours Church 1695-1978 (Fiche No. 6343567 - 2 fiche).

England , Northamptonshire, Woodford nr. Daventry.  Parish Register Baptisms 1813-1840 (Fiche No. 6129475 - 2 fiche).

England , Northamptonshire, Woodford nr. Thrapston.  Parish Register Baptisms 1813-1857 (Fiche No. 6129459 - 2 fiche).

USA New England.  Compendium of New England Gazetteers.  A compendium of 10 early New England Gazetteers (CD published by Archive CD Books USA, kindly donated by Linda Reid)

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's counties will be Northumberland, Durham, Cumberland and Westmorland.

 

This week's Counties are London and Middlesex.  Jeanette Colgan offers the following:

http://www.victorianlondon.org/   Has links to very good old maps of  London. See where your ancestors lived and many other interesting things about London.
http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/   Find out if your ancestors went to trial - London and surrounding area.
http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php   A very helpful forum for genealogy buffs, has  specific boards for London and Middlesex. A lot can be discovered just by browsing or you can join free and post your own questions.

 

The Forum

Answers to Previous Questions

Q1/25/2007.  England/Canada.  Herbert Harold Harrison born 1885 Yorkshire emigrated to Canada 1910, parents gravestone in England indicates he died 13 Dec 1913.  Known to have Ontario connections but cannot find death in Ontario or England.

Gwen Armstrong writes "I believe that Herbert Harold Harrison died in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Registered as Herbert Harrison, age 27, died 19 Dec 1913. Registered in St. Boniface, reg # 1913-071087.

A copy of this record can be ordered from the Manitoba Government at the Province of Manitoba Vital Statistics Genealogy Searches for Unrestricted Records website. http://web2.gov.mb.ca/cca/vital/Query.php

On this site you can search for births more than 100 years ago, marriages more than 80 years ago and deaths more than 70 years ago.

Do your search and when you have found the record you are searching for, click on Select Record, and then return to the search page. Scroll down to the bottom of the page and you can view your shopping cart. If you click on view, a Request for Copy of Genealogy Record will be displayed that you can print. This form can then be mailed or faxed. The cost of a record is $12.00 and can be paid for by cheque, money order or credit card".

Q2/25/2007.  Ireland.  Finding graves where the grave has been reused.  My impression is that churches (unlike civic cemeteries) do not keep plans of the actual location of the graves and once the original gravestone have been removed it would not be possible to establish where the grave was.  However  it should be possible to discover whether an ancestor is likely to have been buried in a particular churchyard although there must be plenty of cases where the burial service was conducted in a church but the body transported elsewhere for burial.  In your case (burials in Aughnacloy, Co. Tyrone) the parish records have been transcribed and indexed, the indexes being in the possession of Irish World - see www.irish-world.com

 

Films Received in the 7 days ending 28 June 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 26 July 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN BC marriages 1928

2074552

DEU Repatriated Germans-Burgardt

1806295

ENG 60th Reg Foot-McGuire

0898133

ENG CHS Wallasey BTs 1750-1878

1836285

ENG LEI Bagworth pr

0585300

ENG YKS Bradford BTs 1829-1832

0990538

ENG YKS Halifax BTs 1830-1837

0990602

ENG YKS Ovenden Meth Ch BTs 1779-1837

0828150

IRL DOW Belfast 1901 Census

0829084

IRL DOW Belfast 1901 Census

0829083

ITL Pachino Civ Recs 1884-1899

1466349

RUS BES Beresina Familybook 1834-

1766557

RUS BES Beresina Familybook 1846-

1768263

RUS BES Beresina PR 1817-1861

1766556

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches

 

Scotland .  Last week we reported some unusual descriptions of the deceased appearing in the parish burial record of Hawick, Roxburghshire, Scotland.  Daniel Parkinson writes:-

"I enjoyed the entries Mary selected but don't agree that the minister was disrespectful.  In Scottish families, and this was true in Canada as well, individuals were often known by their nicknames which was the only way to know who was being spoken of, as many in a community would  have the same names.  A person with knowledge of family nicknames, would be able to identify that the recorded death for Thomas Scott was the person searched for by the addition of "Wicked Tommy"  Despite James Irvine being noted as a miser, someone benefited from his "gift".  Was it to the church?  I  have found that it is a risky practice to judge our ancestors by modern standards of behaviour and protocol".

Editors note:  I cannot altogether agree with this interpretation.  All the entries were in the same hand and the entries preceding them and the entries appearing on the same film for adjoining parishes did not have these embellishments so why would this minister have found it necessary to identify them in this way? In Wales, because of the predominance of certain surnames it is quite usual for someone to be known as Jones the Milk, to differentiate him from Jones the Sweep and Jones the Cobbler i.e. using a trade to define who is being referred to. And whilst on the subject of Welshmen take a look at the piece on Black Sheep in the Were you aware............section.

 

Were you aware................

International.  There is an International Blacksheep Society of Genealogists whose membership is open to anyone who can establish a direct relationship to someone who is, or was undoubtedly a Black Sheep.  This term is not precisely defined but murder and robbery would definitely seem to qualify.  Details on http://blacksheep.rootsweb.com

And now going back to Welshmen and modern standards,  I remember a nursery rhyme that started off "Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a thief".  I suppose that somebody is going to tell me that in the interests of political correctness and the avoidance of racial stereotypes, this rhyme has long since been expunged from every nursery rhyme book and all known copies of books with it in have been pulped, the residue having been dumped in a site registered to take toxic waste.

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 25/2007

 

Our email problems continue.  Although those addressees whose provider is yahoo.ca bounce back to us each week, we can cope with that and send them out again individually.  The real problem is those that don't bounce back since we have no way of knowing of their non-delivery unless readers report it to us.  Many thanks to those readers that have offered suggestions.  However it is not a problem with the anti-spam settings on reader's individual computers since this would not account for the Bulletin being received some weeks and not others.  We understand that other organisations are having similar problems.

 

Next week's Counties for the Favourite UK County Sites section will be London and Middlesex.

 

In this Bulletin

Read what a curmudgeon of a minister in Hawick, Scotland had to say about some of his parishioners in News from the trenches.

News of Ancestry.com offering a DNA testing service in Were you aware............

Announcements

We fast and then we feast.  Last week we reported that no films had arrived in the previous 7 days.  This week 56 have arrived - see below for details.  Delivery times seem to be back to normal.

Additions to our Permanent Collections

 

England , Buckinghamshire Broughton Marriages 1720-1837 (CD FTM32)

England , Buckinghamshire Lathbury Marriages 1690-1837 (CD FTM32)

England , Buckinghamshire Moulsoe Marriages 1559-1837 (CD FTM32)

England , Buckinghamshire Newport Pagnell Marriages 1558-1837 (CD FTM32)

England , Derbyshire Derby, All Saints, Marriages 1558-1837 (CD FTM31)

England , Middlesex Chelsea St. Luke's Marriages 1803-1837 (CD FHM1)

 

The Forum

New Question

Q1/25/2007.  England/Canada.  Herbert Harold Harrison born 14 May 1885 at Huggate, Yorkshire emigrated to Canada in 1910.  An inscription on his parents grave stone in England says "Harold Harrison died on 13 Dec 1913" .  To all family knowledge Harold never married and there were family connections with Ontario in the mid/late 1800's but I cannot find a record of his death in Ontario or England.  Any suggestions?

Q2/25/2007.  Ireland.  Reusing Graves. Seeing the item on this in the recent weekly bulletin brought to mind the following experience and question. When I visited Aughnacloy, Co Tyrone, in Northern Ireland, where I believe my grandfather, and probably my great grandfather, as well as others were buried in the Church of Ireland cemetery, I could find no evidence. I spoke to the person responsible for taking care of the church and cemetery, and he explained that about 1977 or so, the church advertised in local newspapers, and unless family members expressed a desire to keep old existing graves active, gravestones were removed and the gravesites reconsecrated for new use. I didn’t  think to pursue the matter more at the time, but In retrospect it seems strange that there would not be some archival record of those gravestones removed. Does anyone know if the UK situation applies to in Northern Ireland, at least for the Church of Ireland, and whether tracing graves reconsecrated is possible?

 

Favourite UK County Sites.

 

Next week's County will be London and Middlesex.

This week's County is Somerset .

Several readers responded and submitted the following:

www.somerset.gov.uk/archives/ - Somerset Archive and Record Service exists to find, preserve and make available written records of Somerset's people and communities

http://www.bathbmd.org.uk/. Great website for BMD for the Bath area.In progress but almost complete

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/ian.sage/index.htm  PR transcriptions index for Somerset.        http://www.parkhouse.org.uk/index.htm  Roy Parkhouse's site.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~sarahhawkins/parish_transcriptions.htm Sarah Hawkins' South Somerset transcriptions:

http://wsomparreg.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/  Stogumber, Somerset churchyard plan.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~nmfa/Directories/pigot_directory_of_somerset_c1844/  Pigot's Directory of Somerset 1844.

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 21 June 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 19 July 2007.

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN BC births 1900

2134886

CAN BC deaths 1905

1927114

CAN BC deaths 1907

1927123

CAN BC marriages 1888

1983529

CAN BC marriages 1893

1983524

CAN BC marriages 1904

1983530

CAN BC marriages 1910

1983703

CAN BC marriages 1923

2074316

CAN BC marriages 1926

2074505

CAN ON Lincoln Co Marriages 1924

1838209

ENG HAM Binstead Parish Chest

1565952

ENG HAM Binstead PR Bapt 1653-1864

1041227

ENG 17th Regiment of Foot 1760-1854

0876928

ENG 34th Regiment of Foot 1760-1854

0885439

ENG DEV Musbury PR 1614-1837

0917202

ENG ESS Barking Muniments

1966258

ENG KEN Canterbury Bnds & Alleg 1777-79

1894571

ENG LAN Liverpool St Peter C 1823-1826

0093876

ENG LAN Liverpool St Peter C 1835-1837

0093881

ENG LAN Liverpool St Peter C 1839-1841

0093883

ENG LAN Liverpool St Peter C 1841-1846

0093884

ENG LIN E. Allington pr 1750-1940

1542354

ENG Mil Rec WW1 box 7261/2 Moores

2029129

ENG NFK Southery Ats 1706-1811

2186449

ENG SFK Tuddenham St Martin PR

0992049

ENG SSX Brede PRs 1559 - 1837

1364151

ENG SSX Westfield PRs 1540 - 1837

1364169

ENG WW1 Burnt Records 'Drake'

1735985

ENG WW1 Burnt Records 'Wilkins'

2028525

ENG WWI Burnt records Edwd Keir-

2325148

ENG YKS Darfield land tax 1784-1832

1658054

FRA RHN Lyon PRs 1711 - 1713

0727768

FRA RHN Lyon PRs 1714 - 1720

0727769

FRA RHN Lyon PRs 1742 - 1745

0727776

FRA RHN Lyon PRs 1746 - 1749

0727777

FRA RHN Lyon PRs 1750 - 1753

0727778

IND Bengal BMB vol 205 Jul-Sep 1888

0510885

IND Bengal BMB vol 470/1 Jun-Sep 1923

0527568

IOM Douglas St Matthew's PR's 1718-1849

0106718

IOM K. Braddan PR's 1849 - 1860

0106188

IOM K.Braddan PR's 1626 - 1849

0106708

IOM K.German PR's 1849 - 1883

0106177

IRL FER Drumhoney Census 1911

2145440

NLD Meclemblik PR

0115811

SCT C of S & United Churches Rec.Indx

1368204

SCT The James Rusland Family

1750819

SCT Unitarian & R.C. Church Records

1368203

USA MO Linn Co. Marr 1857-1897

1009871

USA PA Alegheny Deeds index O-S

1533099

USA PA Alegheny Deeds index S-Z

1533174

USA PA Allegheny Orphans Crt 1847-50

0866208

USA PA Allegheny Orphans Crt 1850-53

0866209

USA PA Allegheny Orphans Crt 1853-54

0866210

USA PA Allegheny Orphans Crt 1854-55

0866211

USA PA Allegheny Orphans Crt 1855-57

0866212

ZAF Natal deceased estates 1918

1295111

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches

 

Mary Crandall spotted some marvellous entries in the Parish Register of Burials in Hawick, Roxburghshire, Scotland.

Samples:

Unnoted year. April 5.  Isabel Leithead (dirty tibby), spouse of James Leithead, labourer.

Unnoted year. April 12.  William Anderson (happy Joe) child of William Anderson.

Unnoted year. April 14.  William Nichol (Will o the pit) died in Dumfries house of correction.

1823. February 1.  Robert Scott, commonly called Oily Rob, 86.

1836. July 3.  Thomas Scott, carter (called Wicked Tommy).

1836.  August 1.  Jane Ekron (called Old Tush)

1838.  May 18.  William Tinline (Will The Nag).

1838.  May 20.  John Wilson (Punch Bowl)

1860.  February 7.  Isabel Murray (tibby the hoddock)

1860.  February 21.  James Irvine (the miser died in a lodging house and gift a considerable sum of money).

 

Seems that the minister was not overly respectful of the dead.

 

Were you aware................

 

Christina Scott has sent us an article from the Salt Lake Tribune of 17 June wherein it is announced that The Generations Network, parent company of Ancestry.com, has joined with Sorenson Genomics of Salt Lake City to provide a DNA testing and publishing service.  Ancestry.com will begin selling self-test kits on line at "somewhere between $100 and $200".  The swab will be forwarded to Sorenson who will determine the customer's genetic profile.  The profile will be uploaded to an Ancestry.com database and should a link be found with another profile the customer will be notified.  The kit will be made available without signing up for Ancestry.com.

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 24/2007

 

Help Needed.  Does anyone have bulk emailing experience?  This Bulletin is sent out to over 400 people each week, all having asked to receive it.  The problem is that we know that not everyone receives it - I did not get my own copy last week and one reader who is on the list under two different names consistently receives only one.  Both of us have Toronto Family History in our address books.  Does anyone know how to get around this problem?

 

Next week's County for the Favourite UK County sites will be Somerset.

 

In this Bulletin

Please see Announcements for a previously unscheduled closing

Some interesting statistics and the intricacies of Scottish divorce in Were you aware.................

 

Announcements

We regret that due to staffing difficulties the Toronto Family History Centre will be closed at 2 p.m tomorrow afternoon, Friday 15 June (instead of the normal 4 p.m. closing).

The National Institute of Genealogical Studies announce a free lecture given by Dr. Bruce Durie, Academic Director, Genealogical Studies, University of Strathclyde to be held on Tuesday 3 July from 7 to 10 p.m. in Room 728, University of Toronto Claude Bissell Building, 140 St. George Street. Topics will include Regular and Irregular marriages in Scotland before 1834, Wills, Testaments, Inventories and Retours - Inheritance in Scotland.  Registration in advance is essential - call 416 861 0165 to register for what is obviously going to be a popular event.

The Tuesday evening session at the Toronto Family History Centre is now discontinued until after Labour Day.

No films have been received this week.  We have no reason to believe that we are returning to a period of long delays in the delivery of films - probably just a hiccup in the postal service.

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's County will be Somerset.  Your contributions are requested.

 

Last week's Counties were Devon and Cornwall.  Eve Richardson has written to add some important sites.  "For those of us (few though we may be) whose Devon (and other West Country) roots include Jewish ancestry, I would like to add two other very important sites: The Exeter Synagogue Archive: http://www.jewishgen.org/JCR-uk/community/exe/history.htm  The Susser Archive: http://www.jewishgen.org/JCR-uk/susser/  Anyone with an interest in the history of the Jewish communities of Devon and Cornwall should have a look at these sites".

 

This week's County is Warwickshire.  Alas we have not had a single response.

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 14 June 2007.

 

No films have been received this week.

 

News from the trenches

 

Just before Christmas I was successful in solving a problem set by the TV show Ancestors in the Attic.  A lady living in Toronto who was adopted as a baby in Glasgow wanted to find who her birth parents were and whether she had any siblings.  I discovered that she had a half brother living in England and Ancestors took her over there and filmed the first meeting.  Both of them are absolutely delighted that they have made contact.  As the brother is now visiting Toronto the adopted lady invited me to her home to meet her and her brother and the rest of her Toronto family.  It was a pleasure to have been able to help these gracious people.

 

Were you aware...............

 

Scotland , Divorce. In 2006 there were 55,690 births registered in Scotland and 55,089 deaths. 29,896 people were married and 13,013 were divorced. However, the figure for divorces represented a large increase over the number granted in 2005 (10,940) due to a change in the law.

For centuries divorce laws in Scotland were more liberal than they were in England. In 1573 desertion was added to adultery as being a ground for divorce but it was not until 1938 that cruelty also became a ground. In 1976 another ground “unreasonable behaviour” – subsequently to receive very wide interpretations – was added, as was the concept of divorce by agreement. If both parties were agreed, divorce became possible after two years separation and without the agreement after five years separation. On 4 May 2006 a new law came into effect whereby divorce after a one year separation was possible provided that both parties were agreed and after two years without such an agreement and this change in the law was, no doubt, responsible for the spike in the number of divorces noted above. Prior to 1984 divorce cases were heard by the Court of Sessions in Edinburgh (equivalent to the High Court) but from 1984 divorce cases could be heard locally in a Sheriff’s Court.

The papers of divorces heard before 1984 are held in the National Archives of Scotland although searching for them seems to be rather a cumbersome process involving searching two indexes before the researcher is able to get at the files containing the actual papers. From 1984 the General Register Office for Scotland has compiled a register of divorces but does not hold the papers. If the case was heard in the Court of Sessions the papers are held by the Court for six years (longer if children under the age of 16 were involved in the divorce settlement) at which point they are passed to the National Archives. If the case was heard in a Sheriff’s Court then the papers would be held by the Sheriff’s Clerk.

It does not appear to be possible to search for Scottish divorce records on-line. Should you want to search these records let us know and we will contact our friendly Edinburgh researcher whose charges are always very reasonable.

 

United Kingdom .  Re-use of old graves.  Cemeteries in the United Kingdom run by Local Councils are to be allowed to re-use old graves after 75 years, (hitherto 100 years) after seeking permission from surviving relatives.  How hard they have to look for relatives is not specified.  The preferred method is to lift existing remains, deepen the grave and lay a new coffin on top.  Of the approximately 500,000 deaths in the U.K. each year, 350,000 are cremated.

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 23/2007

 

Next week's County for the Favourite UK County sites will be Warwickshire.  Please send us details of the sites you find useful.  Still wanting too, questions for The Forum.  And would someone like to take some time off from their Sudoku puzzle and solve this week's Forum question.

 

In this Bulletin

In a generous mood this week - a reduction in the charge for films and we're giving away a valuable book - see Announcements

Some interesting tales in News from the Trenches

 

Announcements

Reduction in Film Charges.  Due to the improvement in the exchange rate of the Canadian Dollar against the U.S. Dollar we are able to reduce our charge to patrons for the ordering or renewing of a microfilm from $7.00 to $6.50, effective Friday 8 June, 2007.

Tuesday evening session.  We will be discontinuing the Tuesday evening Family History Centre session through the summer.  The last session will be on Tuesday 12 June.  We will resume this session shortly after Labour Day, the exact date to be announced later.  This announcement supercedes the announcement made in Bulletin 21/2007.

Book Give-away.  We have a copy of the 1988 edition of James G. Ryan's "Irish Records Sources for Family & Local History" to give away.  We have a more recent copy of this book which we regard as the book for Irish record sources,but the earlier edition is still relevant in most respects. First come, first served.

Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society will be holding its final meeting before the summer break on Monday, June 25 at 7:30 pm in the auditorium at the North York Central Library. The main speaker will be Ruth Burkholder talking about Where did all Great-Grandma's Children Go in North America?: Strategies for Finding People after 1900. There will also be a mini-presentation from Diana Thomson on Untangling Great-Grandma's Roots: A collaborative study of an isolated Orkney community.

The Forum

New Question Q1/23/2007.  Canada/USA/Ireland.  My grandmother, Florence Edna Josephine Wilkinson, or Wilkison, is shown in the 1900 Census of Detroit, Michigan as Edna J. Wilkison and being born in Michigan in October 1896. Her mother, Elizabeth is shown as being born in Canada E in March 1856 and gives her mother's place of birth as Ireland.  Her father, Edward is shown as being born in Kentucky in October 1855.  Elizabeth is shown as having immigrated into the USA in 1880 and there is in fact another daughter, Anna G, who is shown as having being born in Michigan in August 1881 lending credence to this.  I don't know Elizabeth's maiden name and I can't find a marriage either in Ontario or Michigan of Elizabeth and Edward.  According to family legend both Elizabeth and Edward died in 1903 and my grandmother was shipped to live with a family in Ontario named Wells.

I would like to find birth, marriage and death records for Elizabeth and Edward and the birth record of my grandmother who was always known as Edna.  Any ideas anybody?

 

Favourite UK County Sites

Next week's County - Warwickshire.  Let's us hear from you Black Country people.

Addition to last week's County, Norfolk.   Helen Billing writes: "There is a good list of Norfolk Consistory Court wills, some parish settlement papers and even a few coroner's inquests on http://nrocat.norfolk.gov.uk  "  (And see the interesting things you can find amongst the Coroner's Records in News from the trenches.

 

And now for this week's County  - Devon .  Frances Radford has come up with a wonderful list of sites which we detail below:

www.devon.gov.uk/etched - a collection of illustrations of places, people and events all over Devon

http://www.bbc.co.uk/devon/ - BBC Devon pages

http://www.cheritonbishop.org.uk/ - website for the village of Cheriton Bishop, Devon

http://www.john.lerwill.btinternet.co.uk/personal/country.htm - Country Life in Devon

http://www.dartmoorpress.clara.net/index.html - Dartmoor Press website - lots of stuff about Dartmoor

http://www.rootsweb.com/~engdev/index.html - Devon Gen Web

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~valhender/dirtrans/ - Pigots 1830 Directory of Devon

http://www.devonfhs.org.uk/ - Devon Family History Society website

http://www.devonlife.co.uk/ - Devon Life Magazine

http://www.devonheritage.org/index.htm - A collection of Devon History and other information

http://www.devon.gov.uk:8080/record_office.htm - Devon Records Office

http://www.exetermemories.co.uk/EM/index.html - Exeter history

http://www.foda.org.uk/main/about.htm - transcriptions of the 1723 oath of allegiance rolls for Devon and Exeter, the 1744 and 1779 replies to Bishop's visitation queries and Devon Freeholder's Books 1711-1799 

http://www.thisisexeter.co.uk/ - Exeter Express & Echo website

http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/ - A compendium of Devon information

http://www.moretonhampstead.org.uk/ - Village of Moreton Hampstead website

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~terryw/index.htm#plymouth_directories - info on Plymouth and Southwest Devon

http://www.modbury-heritage.co.uk/ - history of the village of Modbury

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/3033/churches.html - Devon churches

http://ca.geocities.com/stokedamerelopc@rogers.com/ - website for the OPC for Stoke Damerel

 

and Jean Harris writes:

"The very best for  Devon is Genuki Devon:

http://genuki.cs.ncl.ac.uk/DEV/

The list administrator is extremely good at adding links for web sites of everything and anything relating to Devon. So you will find many web sites listed there. Also he has  entered all the Devon names I have extracted from the various calendars (Brit Record Socty Index Library volumes at the Refce Library) for PCC wills 1383-1699.

Another site that one of our DEVON-L rootsweb.com subscribers has recently found (and to be listed on Genuki Devon) is:

http://www.devon.gov.uk/index/culturetourism/libraries/localstudies/etched.htm?url=etched/ixbin/hixclient.exe&_IXP_=1&_IXR=100329
I copied this from the DEVON-L message and it should work OK!"

 

 

Films Received in the 7 days ending 7 June 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 5 July 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN ON Essex 1924 Marriages

2266891

ENG LAN Ringley PR 1836-1940

2356507

ENG MDX Holborn list of newcomers

0569943

ENG WW1 burnt records Jones, Thomas

2300814

IRL DOW Knockbreda/Belfast 1901 Cen

0829087

IRL DOW Knockbreda/Belfast 1901 Cen

0829973

POL Kalisz RC PR

1980838

POL Kalisz RC PR

0814722

POL Przasnysz RC PR 1871-1884

1809615

POL Przasnysz RC PR 1871-1890

1809610

USA NY Albany Rural Cem. index Burns-

0415533

USA NY Albany Rural Cem. index Stover-

0415539

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches

Among the Coroner's Records Helen directed us to (see Favourite UK County Sites) is the following entry:- "John Carpenter, age 40.  19 June 1773, St. Stephen.  He was thrown and kicked by his horse near the cockey. Verdict. Accidental Death".  While I was still wincing I discovered that cockey is a word of saxon derivation meaning watercourse, and that the Great Cockey flows through Norwich.

And I am indebted further to Helen for the following:

"What did Your Ancestor do?

 I have occasionally puzzled over the occupations listed in the census for my ancestors and have turned to a couple of books we have in the FHC library – “What did they do?” and “Langham’s Occupation List” (found on BK1-2). But a  Glasgow census entry, transcribed on Ancestry.com and shown me by one patron, was quite unusual. The occupation listed was “Cugmeers Fetter”. We had no idea what that might be. Thinking about how it could be written, led us to postulate that “fetter” could be:

 1. Fitter - originally a joiner

in the 19c, a person who assembled several portions of machinery

a mechanic who uses a lathe

a coal broker who conducts sales of coal between colliery & shipper

 2. Felter - a worker in the hatting industry

 3. Fuller - one who fulls (changes & thickens) cloth using fuller’s earth

 4. Feller - textile worker who laid or felled seams in material

tree or wood cutter

 5. Filler -  a person who filled bobbins in mills

 6. Fettler -  a textile worker

 

The patron felt that the person could be involved in the textile industry as his sister was but ten years later in 1891, he was an apprentice blacksmith. Although we have a number of possibilities for “Fetter”, what on earth is “Cugmeers” - the name of a company? Maybe viewing the census image would provide the answer.

 

So if you are puzzled by an occupation, have a look in our library. You could add an interesting tidbit to your family tree".

Were you aware................

 

UK . British Phone Books 1880-1984.   If you, like me, were a bit disappointed at the coverage when the British Phone Books went on-line at Ancestry.com , it  might be worthwhile taking a second look.  They now have 772 directories on-line and testing it out I was able to trace the whereabouts of various people in the 60's and 70's.

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Toronto Family History Bulletin 22/2007

 

Lots of interesting things to report this week but still no new questions for The Forum.  We had an underwhelming response too for this week's Favourite UK County Site - Norfolk - so for next week we will combine two counties, Devon and Cornwall.  We know a number of you are involved with these counties so please, let us have the details of the sites you use.

 

In this Bulletin

See the Additions to our Permanent Collections for news on some really useful fiche, generously donated.

We continue to plug the usefulness of the WW1 Burnt and Unburnt Records films.  Further evidence now in  News from the Trenches.

News of 3 more significant datasets which have been added to the British Origins website, of a free offer by Ancestry.com and of the usefulness of the Odessa3 site to patrons with ancestors in Germany and Eastern Europe all in the Were you aware........ section.

Announcements

The film arrival situation continues to improve.  We now have only one film outstanding from the order we placed on 26 April and all previous orders have now been received.

The Quebec Family History Society are holding their Roots 2007 30 TH Anniversary International Conference on June 15-June 17 at McGill University, Montreal. Full details on www.qfhs.ca

The Ontario Genealogical Society and the Canadiana Department of the North York Central Library are presenting a one day workshop on Dutch Family History on Saturday, August 11. Full details on www.torontofamilyhistory.org

The Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch, have given us details of their Autumn 2007 courses. Brief details:

Basic Genealogy and Family History. Oct. 2 – Nov. 20 (Tuesdays 2-4 pm)

Intro to English Family History Research. Oct. 4 – Oct.25 (Thursdays 2-4 pm)

Researching Community and Municipal Records. Oct. 20 (Saturday 9.30 am – 12.30 pm)

Where’s there’s a Will, There’s a Way: Finding Ontario Estate Files. Oct. 27 – Nov. 3 (Saturdays 10.15 am – 12.15 pm)

Advertising your Ancestors. Oct. 24 – Nov. 03 (Saturdays 2 – 4 pm).

Finding your Ancestors in Newspapers. Nov. 15 – Nov. 22 (Thursdays 6 – 8 pm)

British Army Records. Nov. 17 – Dec. 8 (Saturdays 2 – 4 pm).

 Details of these courses are available in the Toronto Family History Centre but do not appear to be posted, as yet, on the OGS Toronto Branch website www.torontofamilyhistory.org

 

Additions to our Permanent Collections

 

USA .  Rhode Island.  Nichols family genealogy.  Fiche No. 6088197 (2 fiche).

Ireland .  Ulster.  Discovering Ulster Origins.  Fiche No. 6085757 (1 fiche)

England . Staffordshire. Alrewas.  Parish Register.  Baptisms 1841-1882.  Fiche No. 6114770.  (4 fiche)

England . Staffordshire. Alrewas.  Parish Register.  Marriages 1837-1901.  Fiche No. 6114771. (5 fiche).

 

Our grateful thanks go to Jean Harris who has donated the following microfiche.

 

Ireland .  Index to Irish Wills 1913.  (2 fiche).

Ireland .  Pigot's Directory of Ireland 1824 covering Connaught, Munster and Ulster.  (4 fiche).

England .  Berkshire.  Pigot's Directory 1823-1824.  (1 fiche).

England .  Dorset.  Poll Book 1807. (2 fiche)

England . Dorset.  Pigot's Directory 1823-1824 (1 fiche)

England .  Dorset.  Pigot's Directory 1830. (1 fiche)

England . Essex.  Pigot's Directory 1823-1824 (1 fiche).

England . Gloucestershire.  Bristol.  Rev. Beaven Bristol Lists 1525-1899 (electoral appointments) (2 fiche)

England . Hampshire (including Isle of Wight). Pigot's Directory 1830. (2 fiche).

England . Shropshire (Salop).  Directory 1828.  (2 fiche).

England . Shropshire.  Pigot's Directory 1830. (1 fiche).

England . Somerset.  Pigot's directory 1830.  (2 fiche)

England .  Sussex Poll Book 1734. (2 fiche)

England . Sussex.  Pigot's Directory 1823-1824 (1 fiche)

England . Wiltshire.  Slater's Directory 1850.  (1 fiche).

Genealogy General.  Human Longevity - J. Easton - 1799 (2 fiche).

 

Favourite UK County Sites. 

 

Next week's counties (see note at the beginning of this Bulletin) will be Devon and Cornwall.  Details required of sites used by all you West Country researchers.

This week's county:

Norfolk .

Alan Billing writes:- "A small website that recently has been useful for me is at www.gravestonephotos.com, which includes several counties, with variable coverage.  It includes about 32 parishes in Norfolk, which is far from complete coverage.  The monumental inscriptions are indexed by name, and you can search for a surname through all the entries of all counties at
once.  It apparently is possible to obtain a photographic image of a monument of interest".

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 31 May 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 28 June 2007.

 

Film Content

Film No

DEU BAD Urloffen RC BMB 1657-1900

0949963

DEU BAD Urloffen RC Marr 1747-1798

0949965

DEU PRU Army bmd 1832-1940

0072972

ENG 4th Reg foot 1760-1854

0864781

ENG CHS Wallasey PR 1594-1812

0090135

ENG CHS Wallasey PR 1813-1903

1737061

ENG SAL Wentnor BT 1638-1867

0992622

ENG SOM Norton St Phillips PR 1781-

1597208

IND Bengal BMB Jul-Sep 1927

0527591

IND Bombay BMB Vol 45 1871

0523847

ITL Barete Civ. Reg. 1860-1864

2013666

ITL Barete Civ. Reg. 1865

2013735

ITL Barete Civ. Reg. 1866-1892

1170519

ITL Barete Civ. Reg. 1893-1910

1168313

NLD Amsterdam Marr 1750-1811 W-Z

0456071

SCT ROX Hawick PR 1819-1854

1067936

UKR L'viv Met Bks Vol 618-2, 400-408

2394865

USA AK Bio. Memoirs of East. Arkansas

0934823

USA NY Oneida Bible Recs 1744-1910

1435190

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

 

News from the trenches

 

Dorothy Stewart tells us that having ordered a WW1 Unburnt Records film hoping that it would provide details of her grandfather’s military career and having been disappointed when it produced absolutely nothing she did not have great hopes of success when she ordered the Burnt Records film in January.

However, having waited 4 months for the film to arrive – which it finally did last week – what a bonanza of information it provided. She copied 20 pages from his file – and that was not all of them – which gave her not only information on his assignments during the war but more importantly about the character of the man himself. There were letters written by Dorothy’s grandmother and her great grandmother giving Dorothy insight into the family situation and possibly a hint of why things played out the way they did. And to cap it all, on the very same day, Dorothy received an email from a lady in New Zealand who happened to live next door to the cemetery where Dorothy’s husband’s great grandmother was buried enclosing photographs of the grave plus the graves of two of her daughters together with copies of their burial records!

 

Were you aware....................

 

Ancestry.com  Deanna Cassidy advises us that for the period 26 May to 6 June, Ancestry.com are offering free access to their collection of US Military Records.

 

UK & Ireland.  That increasingly useful website www.originsnetwork.com have added three significant databases to their site.  The information below is copied from their site.

1.Migration North America to Britain and Ireland 1858-1870. The only surviving ships' passenger lists for ships returning to Britain and Ireland from North America between 1858 and 1870. Because of the threat of an uprising in Ireland, the government required that ports in Britain and Ireland submit their incoming ships' passenger lists. These records were deposited at The National Archives of Ireland and are not available at the UK National Archives. The Index contains all details recorded on these documents as well as lists of ships and details of their voyages. Over 42,000 names are recorded most of whom were of Irish, English or Scottish origins.

2.Boyd’s Family Units

Boyd's London Inhabitants dataset has been extended by a further 10,000 Boyd’s Family Units family sheets which include 137,000 names. Families from London, all over Great Britain, and elsewhere, are recorded, including North American families linked to England mostly from the 16th to 18th Century This collection has been one of the glories of the Society of Genealogists Library, and provides a unique source of information on whole families.

3. London City Burials

The London City Burials Index covers over 36,000 burials in 76 parishes of the City of London for the period 1813-1853. It greatly extends Boyd's London Burials, which contains details of 243,000 burials, but over a much longer period. London City Burials covers all burials - men, women and children - and nearly always shows the age.

 

Germany , Poland, Eastern Europe.  We wrote extensively in Bulletin 46/2006 on the huge amount of genealogical data on people of German origin who were "repatriated" to Germany at the beginning of WW2.  Gwen Armstrong tells us of the success she has had in adding 840 people to her tree from the fully searchable details of the EWZ files available free of charge on the www.odessa3.org site.
 

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 21/2007

My special thanks to Gwen Armstrong who so capably produced the Bulletin whilst I was away and to James Thomson for his magnificent contributions to those Bulletins.

We are still requiring questions for The Forum.  This Bulletin goes out to over 400 readers - someone out there may have the answer to your problem.

 

In this Bulletin

Most of us have succeeded (if that is the word) in uncovering some dark secrets from our family's past.  Wait till you read about Christina Scott's rogue ancestor in News from the trenches.

See Gwen Armstrong's highly informative piece on Canadian censuses in Were you aware............(now that she's got a taste for it there's no stopping her).

 

Announcements

The world renowned Mormon Taberacle Choir is visiting Toronto and giving two performances, at 2.30 p.m. and 7.30 p.m. on Friday 22 June at Roy Thomson Hall.  Tickets which range from $45 to $90 can be obtained from the Box Office at 416 872 4255.

As is our usual practice, we will be discontinuing the Tuesday evening Family History Centre session through July and August.  Actual dates will be announced later.

Film Arrivals.  The unusual delays that have occurred in the receipt of films ordered from Salt Lake seem to be abating.  We now have just one film ordered in January that has still not been received (our special apologies to Ed Bonner) and six ordered on 26 April.  All the films ordered in February and March and for the earlier April orders have now been received.

Favourite UK County Sites

 

Next week's county will be Norfolk .  If you know of sites that are particularly useful, please send us the details.

 

This week's county is Staffordshire.  Bulletin readers have sent us the following:

Staffordshire BMD: http://www.bmsgh.org/staffsbmd/index.html

Staffordshire Monumental Inscriptions http://www.wishful-thinking.org.uk/genuki/STS/MIs.html (Very good coverage - especially the northern parts of the county).

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 24 May 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 21 June 2007.

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN ON Toronto mar 1924

1838200

CAN ON Toronto mar 1924

1838046

DEU Repatriated Germans - Brusow

1806283

DEU Rohau Civ. Reg. 1875-1881

1194896

ENG Burnt Records - Frarey, John Edw-

2148306

ENG Burnt Records - Fraser, Alexander-

2148307

ENG Burnt Records - Fraser, Alexander-

2148308

ENG Dragoon Gds Soldiers Recs 'T'

0866450

ENG GLS Bristol St James BT 1737-

1595553

ENG PCC Wills 1781

0093057

ENG STS Buxton pr 1764-1921

1278995

ENG STS Yoxall pr 1645-1900

1517739

ENG WWI burnt records Howis

2354088

IRL FER Derryvullan Census 1911

2145346

IRL Tithe App. Killyleagh-Killyglen

0258462

IRL Tithe App. McMurry-Nevill, William

1565515

NLD Amsterdam Karthuizen Bur 1745-

0114707

PHL Laguna Binan Marr 1903-1913

1658271

POL Karczew RC PR 1810-1816, 1818

0689487

POL Karczew RC PR 1817

1618645

POL Karczew RC PR 1819-1825

0689488

POL Karczew RC PR 1826-1836

0689489

POL Karczew RC PR 1836-1847

0689490

POL Karczew RC PR 1848-1857

0689491

POL Karczew RC PR 1858-1861

0689492

POL Karczew RC PR 1862-1866

0689493

POL Karczew RC PR 1866

1618658

POL Karczew RC PR 1875-1883

1618642

POL Karczew RC PR 1884-1885

1618643

POL LW St Maria Magdalena BMD 1920-1945

2034926

SCT INV Sleat PR 1813-1853

0990672

UKR L'viv St Peter & Paul D 1916-

2382507

UKR L'viv Hospitals

2329665

UKR L'viv Hospitals

2329664

UKR L'viv Hospitals D

2382879

UKR L'viv Hospitals D

2382872

UKR L'viv St George Cath. D 1862-1887

2290664

UKR L'viv St George Cath. D 1887-1903

2382868

UKR L'viv St Peter & P. BMD 1883-1927

2290949

USA SD Walworth Naturalization 1883-

1782857

WLS Wills, Admons, Inventories 1817 - 18

1657278

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches

 

Christina Scott writes: "Having researched and followed the well documented  life of my 7th Great Grandfather

Jacobus Haverkamp, school master and organist in the little Dutch village of Stedum, I was searching through the Parish
records and came across the following story.

On September 14,  1707 Jacobus Havercamp was removed as elder of the church having placed his hand underneath the apron  of Widow Lubbert IJwes and fondled her pregnant abdomen.  He was replaced by Willem op 't Holt Backer as elder.

(The Widow  had conceived a child after her husbands death.) 

 

Jacobus was already over 75  years at the time of this incident. The life of Jacon Havercamp had been previously documented by Petronella J.C. Elema in the Netherlands in an article for a regional genealogy magazine, in which she reported the previous troublesome behaviour of my ancestor, which ranged from disturbing the peace, argument with the pastor, and land boundary disputes.  On several occasions he had been barred to attend the "holy evening meal".    Jacobus had 3 wives, 17 children and lived to well over one hundred years old. The Parish church council films are interesting to read, and hold volumes of information about the lives of many of our ancestors.  Too bad they are not  always available."

 

Were you aware.................

 

Canada .  Census Data.

 

Until Confederation in 1867, Canada had no official national census. Since 1666 areas throughout Canada conducted their own censuses in different years. Very few of these have survived.

The census of 1871 included Ontario or Canada West, Quebec or Canada East, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. As provinces joined confederation they were included in subsequent federal census returns. Manitoba, British Columbia and PEI are in the 1881 census. Alberta and Saskatchewan did not become provinces until 1905 and a special census in 1906 was done to track population growth of the west and thus only Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta are included. Newfoundland and Labrador did not become a Canadian province until 1949 and had their own census before that.

The 1851 Census was not completed until 1852 and covered:

 

Ontario or Canada West (sometimes referred to as English Canada)

Quebec or Canada East (sometimes referred to as French Canada)

New Brunswick

Nova Scotia (head of household only)

Quebec Census returns before 1851 are rarely complete for any geographical area and most list only the head of each household. Note that some portions of the 1851 Census have not survived – and as some were not done until 1852 it is wise to check the title page to see the date the enumerator did it. This is important when calculating birth dates etc. In 1851 question was age at next birthday.

If the place you are researching does not appear in the database, it is usually because it was a smaller town or village that was not enumerated separately. Those places were enumerated within the surrounding area, depending on how the province was divided at the time. In Ontario, the sub-districts usually correspond with townships; in New Brunswick, with parishes; in Manitoba, with rural municipalities; in Quebec, with townships and parishes; in Prince Edward Island, with Lots. There was no standardized system for the division of Nova Scotia and the districts west of Manitoba.

 

Availability

 

1851

1861

 

1871

 

1881

1891

1901

1911

 

There are many communities available online for links to the websites try:

http://www.censusfinder.com/canada-census-records.htm

http://www.census-online.com/links/Canada/

http://www.islandnet.com/~jveinot/cghl/census.html

 

 

 National Archives of Canada film numbers for Census Returns on Microfilm, 1666 – 1901

http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/020121_e.html

 

You can read about the history of the Canadian Census at: http://www.statcan.ca/english/census96/history.htm

 

Lists questions asked in census:

http://simmons.b2b2c.ca/CENSINFO.HTM

http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/datalib/censusq.htm

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 20/2007

 

Peter is still away and your substitute Bulletin editor is still hard at work. Hardly working?

 

In this Bulletin

 

 

Announcements

 

James Thomson writes: "A brief word about some announcements made recently:

 

1. Family History Centres: In the past few days, there have been, as you may have seen reported by Dick Eastman (www.eogn.com) or on the news releases page of the FamilySearch site (http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Home/News/frameset_news.asp?PAGE=home_press.asp ) or elsewhere, many announcements respecting changes planned for the FamilySearch site and respecting resources which will be newly and freely available through the Family History Centres.  There's a great deal to look forward to as an FHC patron, both in terms of what has been announced to date and in terms of what is yet to come! So perhaps the best and most concise thing to say at this point is: watch this space, for announcements of new resources as they are made available at the Toronto FHC and other new developments as they occur.

 

2. Toronto Reference Library: Anyone engaged in family history research in Toronto is likely to make use of or at least know of the excellent and growing collections of the Toronto Reference Library (TRL) --- not only the genealogy collection in the Special Collections, Genealogy and Maps Centre on the 4th floor but also the complementary collections of interest to us (and conveniently available under one roof), including newspapers, current and historical periodicals and society publications, maps, directories, dictionaries, biographies, the Baldwin Room collections, and all manner of works of social history or local history or military history etc. etc. The TRL has announced that it is holding a "Community Open House" to discuss certain renovation plans; this will be held in the Asquith Room (2nd floor of the TRL) on Tuesday June 5th from 6:30 to 8:00 pm. The TRL is at 789 Yonge Street, on the east side of Yonge one short block north of Bloor. The nearest subway station is Bloor/Yonge."

 

 

News from the Trenches

 

The Forum

 

Answers to previous questions:

 

Favourite UK County Sites

With our esteemed bulletin editor away, it is up to the assistant to make an informed and well thought out decision as to which county should be highlighted next week. So I threw a dart at the map and it landed on Staffordshire.

Kindly send us your favourite sites.

 

Wiltshire sites as recommended by our readers:-

 

http://history.wiltshire.gov.uk/heritage/ - Wiltshire wills ---many that can be viewed free right on the site.  I found some dandies for my family. Also includes other counties.

www.wiltshirebmd.org.uk - for, Trowbridge, Calne, Chippenham, Corsham, Malmesbury

http://www.burbage-wiltshire.co.uk/burbageindex.html - emphasis on Burbage

   

Films received in the 7 days ending 17 May 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 14 Jun 2007.

Film Content

Film No

DEU BAY Bellenburg PR 1720-1900

1978837

DEU Repatriated Germans - Berg

1806191

ENG 4th Reg foot 1760-1854

0864786

ENG LIN Grantham BTs 1701-1859

0432510

IRL LDY Artrea C'stle Dawson Cens 1911

1840351

NLD Amsterdam citizen bks 1788-1811

0114932

POL Bodzanow Jewish BMD 1851-1865

0729203

POL Drobin Jewish BMD 1826-1846

0729204

POL Drobin Jewish BMD 1826-1887

1201496

POL Leczyca Jewish BMD 1817-8,1824

0767130

POL Wyszogrod Jewish BMD 1859-1865

0730210

POL Zuromin Jewish BMD 1846-1865

0702525

UKR Krzwcza Met Bks 1785-1889

2380081

UKR L'viv PR Vol 201 2241-9

2202515

UKR Zlotniki PR 1753-1944

2329212

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.

Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes

 

 

Were you aware...............

 

·          James Thomson writes: "Readers might be interested in a number of new developments:

 

1. Ireland : Last week, the Irish Family History Foundation, which coordinates the county-based genealogical research centres in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, signed an agreement with a technology company to launch pay-per-use online access to the databases held by the centres: http://www.irish-roots.net/view-details.asp?NewsID=66. Note the last few lines of the announcement: "This is the most exciting development in Irish genealogy since the county centres began indexing records in the late 1980s. The first centres will be online later this month. Watch this space for further information.  Please sign up to our mailing list if you wish to be advised when new data is added to the pay Per View system." A suggestion: in the meantime, don't overlook certain existing online indexes comprising the Central Signposting Index: http://www.irishgenealogy.ie/csi/csi_main.cfm. Two other examples of the same type (in that they are the product of bodies which have been part of the same program) are DublinHeritage.ie (limited data) (http://www.dublinheritage.ie/) and the databases of the Ulster Historical Foundation (Antrim and Down): http://www.ancestryireland.com/database.php  .

 

2. England and Wales: The National Archives (TNA) at Kew ( London) has just uploaded a new resource to DocumentsOnline: Southwell Workhouse and Poor Law Union Papers. Southwell Workhouse, in northern Nottinghamshire, is a National Trust property and is of unique interest as being the "best preserved" of the Victorian workhouses which were established pursuant to the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. As with other DocumentsOnline databases, one can freely explore the highly useful background information on the site, and can freely search the index, but in this case one can view the digital images of documents free of charge as well. More information is found at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/stories/160.htm?homepage=news and http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/workhouse.asp. Permit me to make two suggestions. First, in addition to exploring the excellent TNA research guides to which there are hyperlinks in the "Further Information" section of the second webpage, above, do explore the excellent website www.workhouses.org which surveys workhouses (poorhouses in Scotland), and the Victorian systems of poor relief, throughout the British Isles. Second, note that the "Further Information" section also recommends articles in the TNA magazine Ancestors; the Toronto Reference Library (see above) now has a subscription to Ancestors and has acquired almost all the back issues -- current and back issues are available through the Periodicals Centre on the 4th floor.

 

3. British Isles:  The University of Toronto has fairly recently subscribed to the online database The Times Digital Archive, 1785-1985 (fully-searchable text and digital images of the final editions of The Times of London) and has extended its subscription to the online database [British] House of Commons Parliamentary Papers (fully-searchable text and digital images) so as to include the twentieth century as well as the nineteenth."

 

The URL is http://www.findmypast.com/lbSearchStart.action?redef=0

 

http://www.jacobboerema.nl/en/Freeware.htm

‘It is a transcript program – you can load the image to the upper half of the program and transcribe in the lower. I have used it for years, works well.”

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 19/2007

 

Peter is away this week and a substitute Bulletin editor has been drafted. She is very grateful to James, Margaret and others for their input.

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements

James Thomson writes: "A brief word about two helpful resources for British Isles family history research which have come online in the past week:

1. Scotland : Digital images of entries in the Register of Corrected Entries (RCE), linked to the original entries in the statutory (1855+) registers of births/marriages/deaths which they correct, have just been added to ScotlandsPeople (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/). A description of the RCE is available at:

http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/content/help/index.aspx?1314

    Viewing the RCE entry is charged at two (2) credits per entry; this is additional to the five (5) credits required to view the original entry. If an RCE entry is available in connection with the original entry, this is indicated by the appearance of an additional red button on the results screen, bearing the words "View RCE (2 credits)".

    With respect to an image of an original entry which one had viewed (at five (5) credits) before the release of the RCE images, but which may in fact have a corresponding RCE entry, log in to ScotlandsPeople, click on "Viewed Images", call up the image of the original entry, and note whether a red button, as described above, now appears above the image. If it does, one can view the RCE entry for the additional two (2) credits, without having to pay for the original entry again.

 

2. England and Wales: Data for the year 2005 has been added to Ancestry's indexes to post-1983 vital events registered in England and Wales, as reported to the General Register Office:

Births: http://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=8782

Marriages: http://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=8753

Deaths: http://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=7579

    These particular databases are freely searchable, upon registration, from home or from the Family History Centres or elsewhere, and are included in AncestryLibraryEdition, which is freely available to all Toronto Public Library (TPL) cardholders at all TPL branches."

Permanent Collections

We have added 6 new films to our permanent collection:

1476492, 1476493,1476494,1476495,1476496,1476497

These films contain the Christian Fiess Collection. For those of you researching Germans From Russia you will recognize the name. For the rest of us, these films contain copies of original documents, pedigrees, and other certificates of migration, emigration and documentation for those leaving Bessarabia and entering Germany, 1940-1941.

 

A searchable surname index can be found at http://www.odessa3.org/collections/bess/fiess/ as well as a complete description of the films.

 

 

News from the trenches

 

Gwen Armstrong writes:-
”I have been fortunate enough to find records of my family in the Christian Fiess Collection. Including a marriage record of a direct ancestor and a handwritten pedigree chart that goes back 7 generations! The pedigree chart gave me the names of the original settlers in Russia, their exact birth dates, and the village in Germany where they were born. Now if only I could read German…"

 

 

The Forum

New Questions

 

Favourite UK County Sites

We could still use a few more sites for Wiltshire so we are extending our request another week. Please send us details of the sites you find useful outlining what can be found on those sites.

Films received in the 7 days ending 10 May 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 7 Jun 2007.

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN PQ Sorel C of E pr 1784-1842

1430819

ENG Burnt Records - Jones, Thomas J-K

2300817

ENG MDX London All H'lows mun'ts 1500-

1966259

ENG SOM Kingston PR 1715-1897

1526663

ENG STS Buxton pr 1764-1921

1278996

ENG WOR Kidderminster mar 1767-

0435263

ENG YKS Almondbury BT's 1774-1814

0990854

ENG YKS Marsden Cong.PR 1796-1911

1657363

ESP Segovia Turegamo b 1864-1927

1387733

IND Bengal BMB Jan-Mar 1928

0463389

IRL census index McShane/Johnson only

0824240

IRL Tithe App. Seapatrick-Tamlaght O'C

0258468

Patron ordinance submission forms

1553589

POL LU Chelm Jewish BMD 1932-33

0702691

POL LU Chelm Jewish BMD 1934

0702692

POL Zamosc RC PR 1781-1787

0904334

POL Zamosc RC PR 1786-1826

1980399

PRU WPRU Simkau Civ Reg 1874-1879

1194910

UKR Borszczow CR Births 1847-1902

2125359

UKR L'viv BMD 1821-1870

2290937

UKR L'viv BMD 1861-1877

2290938

UKR L'viv BMD 1881-1905

2290939

UKR L'viv BMD 1884-1896

2291019

UKR L'viv BMD 1886-1900

2289637

UKR L'viv BMD 1896-1920

2289638

UKR L'viv BMD 1903-1914

2290934

UKR L'viv BMD 1906-1926

2290940

UKR L'viv BMD 1913-1940

2290935

UKR L'viv Dormition Ch. BMD 1885-1898

2290910

UKR L'viv Dormition Ch. BMD 1899-1908

2290911

UKR L'viv Dormition Ch. D 1876-1902

2382866

UKR L'viv Hospitals

2329663

UKR L'viv Hospitals 1833-1888

2329662

USA MO Dec. of Intentions 1916-1917

1749650

USA NY New York Dth Indx 1905-1908

1324915

USA NY New York Dth Indx 1918-1921

1324918

USA NY New York Marr Indx 1906-1909

1653855

USA NY New York Marr Indx 1910-1913

1543903

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes

 

 

Were you aware...............

 

Margaret Taylor writes:-

“In Yorkshire some parishes were extremely lucky in having what were called DADE REGISTERS, named after the Rev William Dade, vicar of several Yorkshire parishes, who instituted a system of giving substantially more information than normal. If you come across these they are a gold mine, since they usually give in a baptismal entry not only the name of the father but the mother's name, father's occupation, and the names of both grandfathers and parishes of residence, thus taking you back another generation and to other places. In 1812 a further new system was introduced extending the amount of information given but, ironically, giving less information than had previously occurred under Dade Registers. There is no overall guide to which parishes had Dade Registers but you will certainly know them when you see them.

Finally, if you want to know what parish had what registers you really should obtain one of two books - Yorkshire Parish Registers by Colin Blanshard Withers, which covers all Anglican parishes in Yorkshire with full details of when the registers begin, where the originals are held and what copies exist; or the National Index of Parish Registers, Volume 11 Parts 2 and 3, published by the Society of Genealogists (in two volumes, one covering the North and East Ridings and the other, Part 3, the West Riding). The NIPR gives details of not only Anglican churches but Catholic and Nonconformist as well. These books also list Yorkshire Record Offices (of which there are many). “

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 18/2007

 

Another fine response from readers giving us details of their favourite Lancashire sites.  Next week the county will be Wiltshire.

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements. 

Permanent Collections

 

From time to time, thanks to generous donations received from our ever generous patrons, we are able to make significant additions to our permanent collections.  That time has arrived.  The material can be in the form of microfilm, microfiche, CDs/DVDs or books but it must have fairly widespead appeal and must not already be, or likely to be soon, on-line and preferably not something readily available elsewhere in Toronto.  We would like suggestions from readers of the Bulletin as to what they would like the Toronto Family History Centre to hold.  Our present collections tend to be biased toward the UK and this represents the interests of a large number of our patrons but this may be a chicken and egg situation - maybe we would attract larger numbers of members of other communities if our collections covered their interests.  So please, let us have your suggestions.

 

The Forum

Answers to Previous Questions.

Q1/17/2007.  England.  Re. Edmund George Benson "late Captain of the Royal Wiltshire Militia".  We think that your best chance of unravelling this is to consult LDS film 0917276 which contains the Records of Officers Services for the Royal Wiltshire Regiment of Militia from 1835 to 1893.

Q2/17/2007.  England.  Re. the disappearance after WW1 of Ernest Joseph Gloster.  We think that you should firstly search for his death past 1962 when he would still have been only 81 years old.  About 7% of the male population were living beyond that age at that time.  We have entertained the idea (as we feel sure you have) that he emigrated and have searched the 1920 and 1930 censuses of the USA, the Ellis Island immigration, the SSI death index, Ontario marriages and deaths, Manitoba deaths, B.C. marriages and deaths and New South Wales marriages and deaths, without success.

Q3/17/2007. England.  Re. John and William Axford who were in Parkhurst Prison in 1841, transported to New Zealand in 1842 and subsequently returned to England.  What was their offence?  The records of Parkhurst prisoners for the period 1838 to 1875 are held at the UK National Archives in the HO24/1 series.  These would normally give the details of their offence, the date of their conviction and sentence, their occupation, character, state of health and physical characteristics.  Since they were 17 and 15 and unmarried their father's name might also appear.  Details can be found on www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/ifa_15_tracingc18toc20_criminals_sk.pdf  The bad news is that for the National Archives to do the search the charge is £60 but you might well be able to find a private researcher to do the job more cheaply.

Q4/17/2007.  England.  Re. Henry Scatchard, a plumber and glazier, said to have created a stained glass window in a Leeds church, can I search for him in occupation records?  The combination of plumber and glazier is a common one since both trades required a skill of working with lead but we know of no records of these trades.  To pursue the idea that he might have been responsible for the stained glass window you could try parish chest records to see if their is any record of a payment to him but there is always the possibility that the window was donated and payment to Mr Scatchard was made by the donor.

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

The county for next week will be Wiltshire.  Please send us details of the sites you fine useful outlining what can be found on those sites.

 

This week's county is Lancashire.  Here are the contributions from a number of readers (we have eliminated duplicates).

 

www.boothstown.com  an excellent site about a village west of Salford

www.worsley.history.btinternet.co.uk  Worsley, a village south of Manchester- historical connections to the Duke of Bridgewater and the Bridgewater Canal

www.Manchesteronline.co.uk       Daily newspaper internet site

www.manchesterhistory.net/longsight         an area of Manchester - links to Belle Vue

www.lancashire.gov.uk/educationrecord_office        Lancashire archives

www.churches-online.org.uk/salfordarchives/      Roman Catholic Diocese of Salford,Lancs

www.sthelenschat.co.uk    history information

www.mlfhs.org.uk        Manchester and Lancashire Family History Society web site--a good bookshop

www.lan-opc.org.uk/ The OnLine Parish Clerks' Project.  An online parish clerk is a volunteer transcribing records from parishes in a specific area. Lancashire records include parish registers, cemetery records, directories, churchwardens' accounts and others. There are links to other Lancashire sites.
www.aol.com/gayjoliver/Tameside.htm Gay Oliver's website. Gay's site deals mainly with Ashton-under-Lyne and the Tameside area of south-east Lancashire, but there are many, many links to genealogy and history sites of both local and general interest. It's very comprehensive. There are some transcribed records online, e.g. the 1811 census of Ashton-under-Lyne.
www.briercliffesociety.co.uk/ The Briercliffe Society.This is a new site, started in March, relating to the Briercliife area near
Burnley in north-east Lancashire. Already, there are some transcribed records, e.g. wills, parish records, census, plus names of interest and queries, and histories of old houses in the area, on the site. There are some links to other local sites.
www.lancs-lookup.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/ Lancashire Look-up Exchange. Volunteers will look up specific names in local records, including census records, some parish registers, directories, Monumental Inscriptions, and references  in some books. There are links to other Lancashire sites.

www.interment.net/uk/eng/lancashire.htm  part of the Interment.net series of sites – growing – cemetery indexes – volunteer transcribers.

http://cheshirebmd.org.uk/  Part of the local bmd sites – please note that all records for Ashton-under-Lyne are on this site rather than the Lancs BMD site – confusing I know!

www.tameside.gov.uk/localstudies/   Great site – search the image archives

www.lancashirebmd.org.uk/  Almost 5 million records. – Oldham includes Saddleworth, which before 1974 was in Yorkshire but originally part of Rochdale Parish – another confusing fact.

www.xmission.com/~nelsonb/lws.htm  Lancashire Will Search – nearly a quarter of a million records. 16th to early 19th Century.

www.manchester.gov.uk/libraries/arls/registers/index.htm  Lots of amazing information, plus searchable photo archives and listings of holdings.

www.ancestordocs.co.uk/Lancashire.htmPart of Beryl Anderson’s historical documents for sale – check back often. www.google.co.uk/books?id=9cgRAAAAIAAJ&pg=PR1&dq=Lancashire  Google Books – type in Lancashire <enter> and you’re set for the whole day – including Tim Bobbin:-

http://members.pcug.org.au/~pfthomps/lancshis/lancsint.htm  If you’re interested in Lancashire dialect, this will either clear up confusion, or confuse you even more

www.old-merseytimes.co.uk/  Interesting Merseyside items from old newspapers

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/place.asp?gid=20&region=6  History of Lancashire

http://crem.oltps.sthelens.gov.uk:8080/crem/servlet/Telesearch#results St Helens area, local cemetery records

http://www.sthelens-connect.net/forums/index.php?s=a9504cfedca6d8f021f4111d6949397b&showforum=244  St Helens area. The Local History section of the St Helens Connect site has free downloads of parish records and census indexes for the area.

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 3 May 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 31 May 2007.

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN ON Newmarket RC PR 1849-1910

1305825

CAN ON Parry Sound mar 1924

2393910

DEU Budwethen Baptisms 1772-1796

1813537

DEU Emigration Card File 1782-1784

1327507

DEU Rohau Civ. Reg. 1874

1194895

DEU SCI Brieg Evang. B 1792-1803

0879605

ENG CON Paul PR 1595-1812

0226178

ENG CON Paul PR Bapt 1813-1959

0226179

ENG DEV Hartland Hdrd Land Tax 1798

1526151

ENG DEV Stoke Damerel PR 1595-1782

0916921

ENG DEV Stoke Damerel PR 1765-1786

0916919

ENG DUR Gateshead b 1763

0252780

ENG LAN Ashton-in-Makerfield PR 1698-

1885657

ENG LDN Grocers Co Records 1345-1881

1850737

ENG MIL RECs 1914-20 Jaques

2300237

ENG MIL RECs 1914-20 Moores James

2324152

ENG MIL RECs 1914-20 Moores P-T

2324153

ENG NFK Archdeaconry Wills 1710-1712

0167144

ENG SFK Stoke-Ash PRs Transcripts

0992048

ENG WAR Bordesley PR Bapt 1889-

1520101

ENG WOR Tenbury BTs 1813-1860

0992549

ENG YKS Otley BT 1774-1826

0918401

ENG YKS Otley BT 1848-1897

1849387

FRA BAS Hatten births 1793-1815

0731410

IND Bengal pr vol 83-4, 1853

0498991

IOM Douglas St Barnabas C of E 1833-

0106716

IRL Civ. Reg Marriages 1845

0101271

IRL DON Carricknahorna Census 1911

2080824

IRL FER Derryvullan Census 1901

0836122

ITA Provincia Civil Recs 1902-1903

1802008

ITA Provincia Civil Recs 1903-1904

1802009

NLD Amsterdam Immigrants 1820-1851

0493665

NLD Amsterdam Karthuizen Bur 1758-

0114709

NLD Ancestral Research Netherlands

0845093

NLD Medemblik Ch Memb 1698-1800

0516576

NLD Medemblik Ref Ch Bapt 1750-1805

0115812

PHL Megcauagan Deaths 1907-1915

1128529

PHL Megcauagan Deaths 1915-1933

1128530

PHL Pangasthan S'Barb Bapt 1860-73

1128949

PHL Tagudin Baptisms 1843-1858

1214470

POL Karczew RC PR 1866-1875

1618641

POL Nowa Weis Gk Cath PR 1784-1941

1979587

POL TP Chorostkow RC PR 1818-1945

2005223

RUS BES Fiess Collection #1-1971

1476492

RUS BES Fiess Collection #1972-3541

1476493

RUS BES Fiess Collection #3542-5192

1476494

RUS BES Fiess Collection #5193-6900

1476495

RUS BES Fiess Collection #6901-8270

1476496

RUS BES Fiess Collection #8271-9351

1476497

RUS BES Karlswalde Luth. Ch. Bks 1885

1897692

SCT ANS Arbroath Bap 1781-1819

0993332

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes

 

News from the trenches

 

Joan Challis writes:-
"I've been waiting quite a long time for a WW1 Burnt Records film to arrive -but it was well worth the wait.  My husband's grandfather's service record was on the film which not only showed all the details of his service - including when he was disciplined for leaving the base without permission - but also details of his marriage and the births of his children.  We always
thought he had two children but it turns out he had three, one dying at the age of 6 months and the child's death certificate formed part of the record."

Were you aware...............

 

Genealogy generally.  Probate and Administrations.  (this latter sometimes called, for reasons unknown to me "admons").

Requirements vary slightly from one jurisdiction to another but generally speaking when somebody dies leaving assets owned in their name (bank accounts, real estate, vehicles etc) it is necessary to get an order from a court giving permission to a relative, a solicitor, a bank, a creditor, to deal with the estate and to transfer ownership to a rightful claimant.  Where the deceased leaves a will and names in the will an executor (or executors) those persons would normally obtain the court's consent - a Grant of Representation - to deal with the estate.  This is a Grant of Probate. If the deceased did not leave a will or the will was invalid or if the executors named in the will were unwilling or unable to act, other persons may apply to act as the executor for the estate and if granted this would be a Grant of Administration.  There seems to be a popular misconception that a will does not exist where a Grant of Administration has been made but this is not necessarily the case.  Of course, it is also possible for someone to leave a will but no grant of probate or administration is made but this would only be possible if the decedant had constructed their affairs so that no assets remained in their sole name at the time of their death.  This is done to avoid Death Duties and Probate Fees but in that event there is no court to fall back on since technically the deceased did not own anything when they died.

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 17/2007

 

Our grateful thanks to all those readers of the Bulletin who have responded so admirably with more questions for The Forum and for the submissions to the new feature Favourite UK County Sites.  We need to keep this going - submissions required for next week's county, Lancashire.

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements

The Forum

New Questions

 

Favourite UK County Sites

 

The county for next week will be Lancashire .  Send it details of your favourite sites giving details of what can be found on these sites.

 

This week's county is Yorkshire .  A number of readers have sent in details (we have eliminated duplicates) and give here what those readers describe:-

www.simplesite.com/Keighleyhistory/2944508   The site covers the Keighley area of West Yorkshire with many small tidbits of interest; included are old photos of people and places as well as recent pictures of this lovely area.  There is a link to Keighley BMDs, Brigg Burial Ground (with pictures of some of the tombstones) and the Keighley Workhouse

http://www.driffield.org.uk/index.html  Driffield.  It has lists of people from local Directories, BMD from the local churches, history, stories about local people etc.
http://www.calverley.info /.   Calverley and area. This is a marvelous site with  church records, census records, trade directories, maps, war memorials, news items, schools, wills, voters lists, history, constables, etc. 
www.familia.org.uk/services/england/kingston_upon_hull.html  Kingston upon Hull.  Hull also has a city genealogist on staff.

http://www.yorkshirebmd.org.uk   Yorkshire BMD.

And a whole lot of sites given without description (but the URL gives a good idea of what they might contain).
http://www.sheffieldrecordsonline.org.uk/
http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/index/ENG-SHEFFIELD
http://www.gleadless.net/pages/other/streets.htm
http://extra.shu.ac.uk/sfca/
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~engsheffield/
http://www.gencem.org/resources.html#edresources
http://www.sheffieldfhs.org.uk/
http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/YKSlist/yks.htm

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 26 April 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 24 May 2007.

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN ON Peterboro' Co Marriages 1923

2266931

CAN ON Richmond St Philip RC pr

1304679

CAN ON Simcoe Co. Marriages 1924

2393912

CAN ON Stormont Co. Marriages 1924

2393913

CAN ON Victoria Co. Marriages 1924

2393914

ENG Burnt Records - Jones, Thomas

2300828

ENG GLS Hanham PRs

1849449

ENG MDX Islington Banns 1827-1853

2232195

IND Bengal BMB Apr/Jun 1921

0527926

IND Bengal BMB Jan-Mar 1936

0528998

IND Bengal BMB Jul-Sep 1906

0527536

IND Bengal BMB July/Sept 1921

0527927

IND Bengal BMB Oct-Dec 1913

0527902

ITL Udine San Vito Al Tagliamento PR

2163742

ITL Udine San Vito Al Tagliamento PR

2163741

ITL Udine San Vito Al Tagliamento PR

2163740

POL Krasnik Jewish Births 1826-1849

0715440

POL Krasnik Jewish Deaths 1847-1865

0715444

POL Krasnik Jewish Marr 1826-1865

0715442

POL Wielkie Oczy CR 1784-1875

2380058

RUS BES Kishinev Lutheran B 1909-19

2161881

RUS BES Kishinev Lutheran M 1892-

2161884

SCT DFS Tundergarth PR 1791-1854

1067971

SCT DFS Wamphray PR 1709-1854

1067972

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes

 

Were you aware...................

Here are some statistics.  Percentage of all deaths:

United Kingdom

1900    0.1%

1930    0.9%

1950    15.6%

1970    55.4%

1990    69.6%

2004    72.2%

 

Canada

1930    0.5%

1950    1.9%

1970    5.9%

1990    32.5%

2004    56.0%

 

USA

1950    4.0%

1970    4.6%

1990    17.1%

2001    26.9%

 

One wonders how much longer the practice of embalming a body so that it looks nice for a few hours in a funeral home is going to be allowed to continue.  The principal embalming fluid is formaldehyde, a Class 1 carcinogen and when the body is consigned to the ground it seems inevitable that the fluid must find its way to a water course.  Cemeteries are currently exempt from the provisions of the Enviromental Protection Act.  And no doubt the popularity of cremation is being encouraged when the relatives of the dear departed discover that the cost of a modest casket to be lowered into the ground starts at about $8,000.

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 16/2007

 

We need some more questions for The Forum.  Experience seems to suggest that long involved questions do not get answered - better to keep them short and then, if necessary, follow up with another question.

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements

Films received in the 7 days ending 19 April 2007, due to return (unless renewed) 17 May 2007.

 

Film Content

Film No

CAN British Forces Recs J-K

1711862

CAN ON Kemptville Cath PR 1844-1910

1302005

CAN ON Kemptville Cath PR 1844-1910

1302004

CAN ON Kent County marriages 1924

1838207

DEU PRE Tilsit deaths 1853-1871

1813540

ENG 93'd Reg of Foot O-S

0861706

FRA HRN Colmar PR C 1650-1723

0729827

PHL Meycauagan Bulacan Bapt 1919

1128525

PHL Meycauagan Bulacan Bapt 1928-

1128526

POL LU Ratoszyn Catholic PR 1811-24

0753339

POL LU Ratoszyn Catholic PR 1825-29

0753340

POL LU Ratoszyn Catholic PR 1850-65

0753341

SCT CAI Thurso PR 1671-1854

0990556

UKR Bruckenthal BMD 1804-1862

2328797

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes

 

Were you aware...............

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 14/2007

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements

Additions to our Permanent Collections

Films received in the 7 days ending 5 April 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 3 May 2007.

Film Content

Film No

CAN ON Norfolk Co. Marriages 1923

2266928

CAN PQ Montreal Christ Church 1819

1430780

DEU BAD Urloffen Births 1756 - 1877

0949964

DEU BAD Urloffen Marrs 1786 - 1868

0949966

DEU Schwetz Births 1862-1883

0245574

ENG KEN Canterbury Peculiars Marrs

0396184

ENG NFK Archdeaconry Marr Bonds 1715-34

1596561

ENG NTH Peterboro' Marr Bonds 1824-

1999617

ENG NTT Sutton on Trent BTs 1813-38

0504538

HRV Croatia Sumber Births 1673-1857

2099963

IRL DOW Belfast 1901 Census

0829082

IRL DOW Belfast 1901 Census

0829079

NL Amsterdam Vit Recs Indx 1903-12

1452998

UKR L'viv RC Marr Indx 1931-1946

2034921

USA NY Erie Co. Deeds 1840 - 1841

0590039

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches

 

David Parker writes:-

"Some years ago, when I first started my research into the history of my family, a member of the FHC staff told me  that it was not just getting the names and the dates, it was meeting the people.  He was so right.  Over the years I have had the pleasure of meeting  many previously unknown relatives, mostly a little distant. 

One of the things that I have learnt from all this research is persistence, and so just two weeks ago came the greatest pleasure, the end of a long search.  I am one of six cousins on my paternal side. Because of family feuds I had never met one of them and had only seen two of them about twice, and that not since 1960. Now we are  all in contact with each other, for the first time ever.  The two that I was already in touch with are in Basildon, Essex and in Worthing, Sussex; the two that I had hardly ever seen are now in Ireland  and in Portsmouth, he having returned there recently  from Missionary work as a JW in Spain and the one that I had never met is in New Zealand.  My cousin in New Zealand, had no memory of her father and had seen no pictures of him -  the parents having separated when she was two and he died five years later. One of my  greatest joys  was sending her pictures of her father. The last cousin that I located, that two weeks ago, the JW Missionary has just got engaged for the first time at the age of 61!  We are hoping to visit England next year, and I am hoping that all the British Isles cousins can meet again."

 

Were you aware..............

The cost of the assisted passage varied. Single women of good character going to New Zealand were often given free passages and this included provisions for them on the roughly 100 day voyage while an adult going to Canada could be charged £6.6s. A pamphlet issued by the National Emigration Aid Society c.1869 extolling the virtues of emigration is shown in full on www.theshipslist.com/Forms/assisted1869.html

Various databases exist for these assisted immigrants. Those arriving in New South Wales 1839-1896 are shown on http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/archives/indexes_online_3357.asp . Arriving in Victoria, Australia between 1839 and 1871 are shown on http://proarchives.imagineering.com.au/index_search.asp?searchid=24 . Assisted immigrants to New Zealand between 1871 and 1888 are on a series of LDS films, 1514972 to 1514979 and 1514952 to 1514962.

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 13/2007

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements

This means that commencing Monday, April 2, we will continue to be able to provide the full Ancestry.com service i.e. indexes and images, only on one computer - Computer No. 1.  The other computers we believe will be able to obtain the limited service - England & Wales 1841-1891 censuses indexes but not images (but note that we could provide the 1891 images on microfiche) and the 1880, 1900 and 1920 US censuses indexes and images but neither  the 1901 England & Wales or the 1930 US census index or images.

To cope with this situation - which we hope will be of a short duration - we are making changes to the booking procedures for Computer No. 1.  As from Monday, April 2 patrons will be able to book this computer for only one half-hour period per session.  (A session is defined as the periods 9.30 to 12, 12 to 2, 2 to 4 and 6.30 to 9.30).  Needless to say if no one else has booked, the patron is free to continue.  The other computers will remain bookable for the full session.

Additions to our Permanent Collections

 

USA .  Pennsylvania, Alleghany Co., Round Hill.  Presbyterian Church Records 1871-1935 and Cemetery Records 1788-1970.

Fiche 6048270.

Germany . Hamburg Passenger List Research Papers. Series C, No. 30. Fiche 6000034

Germany . Captured 1932-1945 German Documents.  Fiche 6334167

 

The Forum

Answers to Previous Questions

Q1/12/2007. England. ( William Parker, b. 1876, 1901 Census of Aston, Birmingham shows him as Electrician and Lay Preacher. How do I find out what his church connections were?). The fact that he married in the Church of England Parish Church I do not think is terribly significant. If he belonged to a denomination such as the Methodists or Baptists he would not have been able to marry in their place of worship unless he had a Registrar present which would have added to the cost. However, the place where any children were baptized would be significant and if, in fact they were baptized in an independent church you might well assume that this is where his affiliations were – he might well have baptized his own children. I note that in the 1901 census he is not described as a lay preacher but as a local preacher and I note too that just a few doors away from where he lived in Dolobran Road stood the Christ Church Mission Hall. This, no doubt, was affiliated to the Parish Church of Christ Church in Aston and I would not therefore discount the possibility that his local preaching took place there. The Church of England did use lay preachers, particularly in working class areas, quite often Church Army officers. Baptisms for the period 1901-1912 which took place in the Parish Church are on LDS film 1545530 and, if your further research leads you to suspect that his connections were with the Church of England you might want to take a look at the Vestry Minute Books in case he charged up some expenses. For the period 1832 to 1917 these are on LDS film 1545635.

Q2/12/2007. Scotland/Canada.  (Heard family emigrated from Scotland to Canada 1850's).  We have made some progress with this quesion and expect to be able to provide an answer shortly.

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 29 March 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 26 April, 2007.

Film Content

Film No

ENG BKM Choulesbury PR 1583-1837

0919225

ENG BKM Gt Hampden PR 1557-1812

0924816

ENG ESS Great Oakley PR 1559-1928

1565653

ENG NTT Lenton BTs 1600-1812

0503787

ENG SAL Burford PR BMB 1813-1928

1526893

ENG YKS Masham PR BMB 1742-

0993290

ENG YKS Masham PR BMB 1800

0993291

SCT Chiefs of Grant

0277773

SCT Chiefs of Grant

0277771

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches.

 

Never give up.  Chris Roberts writes:

My Search for "Russian Tom"
In March 2002, I came to a roadblock trying to establish the birthplace of my Sheffield g-g-grandfather, Thomas Surgey.  I knew nothing about him except that he was called "Russian Tom" by his mates "at the works," and that he had been in the navy.  I was unable to find his 1838 birth on the GRO and so, in the absence of earlier census information, concluded that he probably wasRussian born and had Anglicized Sergei to Surgey.  I sent an email request to Rootsweb's Sheffield mailing list for some ideas about "Russian Tom's" birthplace including the above facts .  Nothing came of that and so, I set the search aside.
In November, 2006, I received an email from woman in England.  She had seen my request in the Rootsweb archives and was writing to tell me that "Russian Tom" Surgey was her g-g-g-grandfather and that her mother was my grandmother's first cousin!  (They were both born in 1897.)  Over the following months, we emailed back and forth filling each other in on the oral history that we had heard, as well as sharing new information we were now finding on early censuses, BMD indexes, cemetery transcriptions and certificate data.  Through her, I was put in touch with another Surgey descendent of Tom whose father was another cousin of my grandmother.   Now, we had a descendent from each of Tom's three children.
We found out that Tom Surgey was indeed English-born--in Horncastle, Lincolnshire.  His father died when he was 2 and in 1851, at age 12, he was in a Horncastle workhouse.  We learned from another relative that he did sail on ships--plying the Baltic Sea--before he settled in Sheffield.  (Perhaps this is where his moniker originated.) But the icing on the cake, was receiving photos of ancestors I knew only by name--extended family members who lived but a few streets apart.   (Being immigrants, our photo collection of this family was very limited.)  Now, I have photos of my great-grandparents when they were young, my g-g-ggrandmother in old age, as well as  siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins of my grandmother, two family wedding
groups--even a photo of Captain Surgey's straight razor and his pipe.  Perhaps the most poignant, were the photos of Gran as a young woman, lovely and stylish and her only sister that died of TB at age 23 in 1918.  I treasure them daily, often noting some striking family resemblances.
As a result of a simple query on Rootweb, I have gained so many insights about my mother's and grandmother's early life and the
ancestors/extended family that were important to them.  I can't begin to express just how much it has meant to me.  So, don't give up.  "Cast your hook and a fish will come."

 

Were you aware.............

United Kingdom . Searching for living people. Only around 40% of UK telephone subscribers ( England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) are now home phone BritishTelecom subscribers. Competition is such that you can sign up for service by the local supermarket chain and more and more people are using just a cell phone service, dispensing entirely with a home phone. But it is only BritishTelecom that has a searchable telephone directory and even with this one has to know the area in which the person is living. You have to be fairly lucky then to find someone. An independent service – www.192.com – provides an alternative. Their records are based on the Electoral Rolls with a listing of 29 million people. For £349.99 you can buy a CD which would enable you to search by a name or an address but I can’t imagine many of you buying this. However you can search free of charge on-line by a name and a town and the listing shows all the people of that name living within a 25 mile radius of the town. It doesn’t show the full address, just the name of the town or village or the postal district of the bigger cities. But it does show the names of people living with the named person so, knowing the name of a partner, one can often identify the correct person. However, you still won’t have the full address. To get this you will have to buy credits from 192.com, the minimum subscription being £9.95 for 5 credits, 1 credit being required for each search for an address from the original free of charge listing. Now, here comes the Toronto Family History Centre bonus. I have a personal collection of Electoral Roll CDs that I will willingly look up for you. Email me pgoddard@interlog.com with the details – possibly obtained from the free of charge 192.com listing – and I will do my best to provide you with the address information.

 

United Kingdom .  We have referred in previous Bulletins to the www.findmypast.com site as being the place to go for Passenger Lists for people leaving the UK.  Again this is a pay-per-view site but it is possible to obtain quite a lot of useful information without paying a penny.  As a test of this I put in "Goddard" in the main search box and came up with over 1000 entries in the Passengers leaving the UK 1890-1909 database, in most cases giving me their full name, their destination and year of departure.  I was able to cut and paste the listing into MS Excel and sort by year of departure, giving me an idea of who was travelling with who.  Where they were going to the US I was able to compare this with the Ellis Island lists.  The search also gave me the full names of 8 Goddards appearing in the Clergy List of 1896 and 6 in the Medical Register of 1913.  To obtain copies of the actual entries can get expensive.  An image of a passenger list uses up 30 units and the smallest number of units one can buy is 50 at a cost of £5.

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 12/2007

 

Lots of questions in this week's Forum  Would appreciate help in answering them!

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements

The Forum

 

Answers to Previous Questions

Q1/09/2007 UK/Canada/USA.  Professional records such as for lawyers and doctors (partially answered in Bulletin 10/2007).  Marian Press writes: The Inner Temple Admissions Database is online.  I found one of my relatives there.
http://www.innertemple.org.uk/archive/itad/index.asp.

 

New Questions

Q1/12/2007.  England.   My grandfather William PARKER was born in 1876, in Aston, Birmingham.  The 1901 census shows him as a "Lay Preacher and electrician"  In July 1901 he married at a local C of E Parish Church.  I doubt if at the age of 25 he would have been a lay reader within that denomination - Methodism or Baptist would be more likely -he was teetotal.  That he was a lay preacher was a surprise at the time of the release of the 1901 to all his grandchildren and his one remaining daughter-in-law, for none of us remember him as a Church-goer. By 1905 he had left Aston for Heysham, Lancs and by 1915 was in Portsmouth.   I would appreciate any suggestions on how to discover what his church connections were.

Q2/12/2007.  Scotland/Canada.  I am having trouble tracing my great grand-aunt, Mary Jane Heard/Hurd. Her parents, Robert and Jane immigrated to Canada from Scotland in the mid-1850's with their children: Andrew, William Robert, Elizabeth, Annie, James and Joseph. The first record I have of Mary Jane is on the 1871 Canadian census for District No. 58, North Peterborough, in the Township of Dysart, where she is listed as living in the same household as her mother, Jane (age 75) and three siblings: Andrew (age 27), Annie (age 28), Joseph (age 24). Mary Jane’s age is shown as 19, making her date of birth 1852. According to this census, the place of birth for all members of the family was Scotland. On the 1881 census ( Peterborough East, District 125), the family is now comprised of Jane (age 85), Andrew (age 37), James (age 34), and Mary (age 25), making her date of birth 1856. Her birthplace is now shown as Ontario, although the rest of the family are listed as being born in Scotland. As you can see, I have not determined the particulars of Mary Jane’s marriages. I cannot find a death record without knowing her married surname and date of birth. As to the birth, I am not sure if it occurred in Scotland or Ontario and remain uncertain of the date. Depending on the date, her legitimacy may also be called into question. I would be most appreciative if anyone has any suggestions how to resolve this problem.

Q3/12/2007.  Canada. My 2nd ggrandmother was born  Mary Brown c 1804.  On 23 April 1823 she was married at St Mary's Cathedral Kingston, ON, to Ronald MacDonald, witnesses John MacDonnell & W Fraser. Mary and Ronald moved to Wolfe Island, ON and the births of their childlren are recorded in either the St Mary's Cathedral Kingston and or Sacred Heart of Mary Church Wolfe Island, ON registers between 1825 and 1848. Mary is listed in the 1851 census for Wolfe Island, with her family, as age 47 and born at sea. She is also in the 1861 census for Wolfe Island but shown as age 59 born Wolfe Island. Her husband Ronald MacDonald (UEL) was born Glengarry ON c 1798, died 22 October 1862 and is buried in the Sacred Heart of Mary old Cemetery on Wolfe Island. His Will dated 1862 and registered in 1868 mentions "my beloved Mary McDonell".  Mary is not mentioned in the 1871 census for Wolfe Island and I have not located her with any of her children in that census.  Furthermore, I have not found a death, remarriage or interment record in either the Sacred Heart of Mary or St Mary's Cathedral records. I would be very glad to receive any advice on where I might look for my missing Mary. Also her birth at sea without confirmation of family member names seems impossible to confirm.  Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Q4/12/2007.  England.  I have been searching unsuccessfully for the British military record for my maternal great grandfather, John Thompson. There is clear evidence (official & unofficial) that he spent from the 1840s to the early 1860s as a member of the Royal Artillery. He was stationed in or near Montreal in the 1840s, and was married (apparently in Montreal) to Ann Walford and back in England by about 1850. His children’s census and birth references indicate his family address was at Woolwich (headquarters of the RA I think) for nearly all of the 1850s, and in the 1861 census he is listed at Frimley (near Aldershot). In the 1861census and in his son’s (my grandfather’s) 1855 birth record, John Thompson is identified as a Sergeant in the Royal Artillery.In 1862, he and his family of 5 children (all born in England), returned to Canada (whether still in the military or as a civilian is not known), where 6 more children were born. In 1869 he received a land grant in Draper Twp in Muskoka, where he farmed and lived until his death in 1899.According to all census references ( England and Canada) he was born in Scotland, around 1822 to 1824. His Ontario death record indicates he was born in Dumfriesshire, Scotland. I have unsuccessfully tried a number of sources including: the National Archives in Ottawa (for British military who served in Canada), and the suggestions from earlier FHC bulletins for searching for records of British military personnel through the (British) National Archives website. So far I have found nothing, including in the search by name. However, not having much knowledge of military ranks, practices and administrative procedures, terminology, etc., I may have missed the proper place to search. Does anyone have any suggestions?

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 22 March 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 19 April 2007.

Film Content

Film No

CAN Bio. of Lucy Anna Olney Nichols

1033909

DEU Budwethen Baptisms 1844-1849

1813545

DEU Repat Germans EWZ 57

2098537

ENG CON Tremyne Family

1696698

ENG DBY Dronfield pr 1560-1922

1041034

ENG DEV Exeter Death Duty Reg 1796

1368366

ENG LAN Ashton in M'field Bur 1861-

1885663

ENG NFK Scoulton PR 1550-1924

1526885

ENG OXF Headington Monument Inscrip

0496510

ENG YKS Slaithwaite PR 1813-1837

0990698

ENG YRK Huddersfield pr 1818+

0990695

GRD St Andrew Civ Reg 1905-1931

1523427

IND Bengal BMB Jan-Mar 1909

0528122

IOM Douglas Athol Str Ind Chapel 1809-

0106721

NDL Almelo Doopgazinde Kerk Baptism

0116413

NLD Medemblik Burial Bk 1783-1826

0526660

PHL Binalonan Pangasinan Bapt 1884-

1209459

PHL Binalonan Pangasinan Bapt 1895-

1209735

SCT ANS Maines S'mtin PR 1635-1740

0993488

USA Alvin Nichols Utah Pioneer

0962259

USA Nichols Families in America

0874432

USA Nichols Family History

1440708

USA UT Brigham City LDS Records

0025810

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

Were you aware…………….

 

Canada/England/Scotland. The Tale of the Three Gazetteers . Most of you will know that I have very little patience with those researchers (I use the word with some difficulty) who go merrily adding names to their shaky family tree with little evidence, other that they found names that looked right on the IGI. Even less with those who publish their dubious findings on some website or other. The laws governing pornography should apply. But many keen researchers overlook discovering what the places where their ancestors lived were really like – the places where they were born, where they were married, where they had children, where they worked and where they died.

A rich treasure trove awaits you in three gazetteers that we have on microfiche in the Toronto Family History Centre. Here I give you examples of the material you can find for places taken more or less at random from each of these gazetteers. You will almost certainly find even the smallest hamlet in these gazetteers

 

Canada . The Dominion Directory 1871 . (Microfiche 6046766. 48 fiche)

Box Grove. A small village in the township of Markham, county of York. It possesses good water privileges. Distant from Scarborough, a station of the Grand Trunk railway 10 miles; from Markham 3 miles; from Toronto 20 miles. Mail daily. Population about 150. (There follows a list of 40 of the inhabitants among which are John Bede a toolmaker, John McCaffrey the postmaster, Joseph Milroy the tavernkeeper, William Hendley the butcher, a cooper, a blacksmith, a weaver, several carpenters, farmers, labourers and John Raymer who worked in a cheese factory.

 

England . The Imperial Gazatteer (sic) Published 1871. (Microfiche Nos. 6020308 to 6020336)

DATCHET, a parish in Eton district, Bucks; on the river Thames and on the Windsor branch of the South Western railway, 2 miles E of Windsor. It has a station on the railway and a post office under Windsor. Acres 1,630. Real property £6,086. Pop., 982. Houses 182. The property is much subdivided. Two bridges called the Victoria and the Albert, the former a neat iron structure, give communication across the Thames. Datchet Mead was the scene of Falstaff’s punishment in the “Merry Wives of Windsor”. A fishing house of Sir H. Wotton, yearly visited by Isaak Walton, stood on the Thames at Datchet; and was succeeded by a summer house of the painter, Verrio. Anglers from the old times till the present, have loved to fish here; and Pope says, respecting Charles II,

 

“Methinks I see our mighty monarch stand,

The pliant rod now trembling in his hand:

And see, he now doth up from Datchet come,

Laden with spoils of slaughter’d gudgeons home”

 

The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Oxford, Value £145. Patrons, the Deans and Canons of Windsor. The church was rebuilt in 1869 and is in the decorated style. There are a Baptist chapel, a library and reading room, a national school, and charities £119.

 

Scotland . The Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland. Published 1882. (Fiche Nos. 6020391 to 6020411)

Alloway. An ancient quoad civilia and a modern quoad sacra parish of Ayrshire, on the lowest reaches of the ‘bonny Doon’ 2 miles S of the town of Ayr. The ancient parish, lying wholly to the right of the Doon, and separated by Glengaw Burn from Ayr, was united to the latter towards the close of the 17 th Century; the modern parish includes a portion of Mayhole, on the Doon’s left bank, and had 815 inhabitants in 1871 (315 of them in Mayhole). In the presbytery of Ayr and synod of Glasgow and Ayr, with a stipend of £150, it possesses a handsome Gothic church (1858), and a public school, which, with accommodation for 159 children had (1879) an average attendance of 117, and a grant of £75.13s - . ‘Alloway’s auld haunted kirk’ a little roofless ruin, First Pointed in style, stands just below the ‘Auld Brig’ of Doon. Visited now by pilgrims from many lands, this long had been merely the resting place of unknown peasant folk, when Burns selected it for the scene of the demon revelry of Tam o’Shanter. Near the churchyard gate, the grave of the poet’s father (1721-1784) is marked by a simple stone – not the original which relic-mongers carried piecemeal away; the poet himself would fain have shared that grave. The interior of the kirk has been stripped of its woodwork, for snuff boxes and the like; here is buried David Cathcart, Lord Alloway (1764-1829), senator of the College of Justice. A cenotaph to Burns, erected in 1820 after a design by Hamilton of Edinburgh, at a cost of £3350, and comprising a triangular base, a Corinthian cyclostyle, and an ornate cupola, with surmounting tripod, stands about 100 yard E of the old church and is surrounded by an enclosed plot of 1¼ acre, in which a small grotto contains Thom’s statues of ‘Tam o’Shanter’ and ‘Souter Johnnie’. The Auld Brig o’Doon, a gaunt structure of great antiquity, famous for the fight between Cassillis and Bargeny (1601), more famous for its part in Tam o’Shanter, crosses the river close to the monument; and the neat new bridge, later than Burn’s day, spans it, some distance lower down. The ‘Auld Clay Biggin’, Burns’ birthplace (23 Jan 1759), and scene of his ‘Cotter’s Saturday Night’, stands about ¾ mile to the N, and, theretofore a public house, was purchased in 1880 for £4000 from the Ayr Corporation of Shoemakers by the trustees of the monument, by them to be converted into a kind of Burns museum. Mount Oliphant, to which Burns’ father removed in 1777, is about 1 ½ mile to the ESE; and Doonbrae Cottage, Cambusdoon House, Roselle, and Doonholm are seats within ½ mile of the church or monument. Alloway Moat, near the avenue leading to Doonholm, is an ancient artificial mound, used in old times for holding courts of justice. Ord.Sur, sc 14, 1683.

 

England and Wales. Post-1837 Indexes to Births, Marriages and Deaths . James Thomson writes “I touched last week on online indexes to local register office registers; an excellent starting point in finding such indexes is www.ukbmd.org.uk . (Although the URL was given correctly last week, there was problem with the hyperlink – the link as given in the preceding sentence should work fine.) There are, as was noted, some prospective advantages in searching in the local registers in preference to the national (General Register Office, or GRO) registers which were compiled from them.

 

One of the great advantages of the GRO indexes, of course, is that it's possible to search across all registration districts in England and Wales at one go. Additionally, such indexes (or indexes compiled from data in the GRO indexes) are conveniently and freely available to us here in Toronto: for instance, FreeBMD www.freebmd.org.uk is an excellent resource for the period 1837-1915; the Toronto FHC in Don Mills has a complete run of the GRO indexes on microfilm and then fiche for the period 1837-2003 (with the 2004 fiche about to arrive); and there are databases (currently freely accessible from home, upon registration) in Ancestry which include browseable digital images of the GRO indexes for the period 1837-1983 and fully searchable databases for the period 1984-2004.

The GRO indexes are known to suffer from errors and omissions, however, and hence the indexes (such as those in FreeBMD and Ancestry) compiled from data in them can be no better. However, there is now a major program to completely re-index the entries in the GRO registers, and to make the new index freely available online. The new index will also include data fields not in the current GRO indexes for the early years of civil registration, such as: for births, mother's maiden name (now available only from 1911); for marriages, spouse's name (now available just from 1912 or through FreeBMD); and, for deaths, age at death (now available just from 1866). Of course, this is in essence a new and enhanced index to the GRO registers – and to the extent that the entries in the GRO registers themselves contain errors (such as transcription errors introduced when the GRO registers were compiled from the local registers), indexes to local registers such as those signposted on www.ukbmd.org.uk may remain an attractive alternative.

 

It is planned that the new index will start to appear online early in 2008, the first tranche perhaps to consist of birth and death entries for the period 1837-1958. Although it will be possible to order a certificate of a register entry by way of a direct link from the index, and although digital images of the register entries themselves are also being created, current plans -absent legislative change- are to employ such digital images internally only, for certificate preparation (in other words, one would still have to order a certificate of such an entry rather than having direct access to the digital image – in contrast to the situation in Scotland, for instance).”  

 

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 11/2007

 

In this Bulletin

Announcements

Additions to our Permanent Collections

 

Canada, Ontario Grenville Co.  Cemetery Records.  Microfiche No. 6067284 (2 fiche)

Canada , Ontario, Kempville Marriages 1858-1880.  Microfiche No. 6126032 (1 fiche)

England , Devon, Kingsbridge Parish Register 1612-1797.  Microfiche 6035471 (4 fiche)

 

The Forum

 

New Question

Q1/11/2007.  England & Ireland.

I recently started to research my mother's side of the family which has roots in Ireland.   My great great great grandparents were John and Elizabeth Hand (formerly Hand).  I have no dates or place of birth or death for either John or Elizabeth but do know that they were married on March 3, 1872 in the Catholic Chapel, St. Mary's Church, on Haddington Road in Dublin.  The marriage certificate lists James as being of "full age" and Elizabeth being 18 which puts her date of birth in 1853 or 1854.  The 1901 British Census lists James' age as 54 and if that is accurate would put his year of birth at 1846 or 1847.   However, the 1871 census records his age as 32 with his year of birth as 1839.  Other information on the marriage certificate - Elizabeth's father's name was John Hand (bricklayer) and James' father was named Bernard Hand (farmer).  I also know that subsequent to their marriage John and Elizabeth lived on West St., Castleblayney, Co. Monaghan where they had their first child, a daughter named Mary Anne who was born on June 19, 1874.  They then had a son John Hand born on September 4, 1976 in either Castleblayney or Dublin.  They then emigrated from Ireland to Prestwich, England between 1876 and 1879 where my great great grandmother Elizabeth Christina Hand was born on January 8, 1879.  John and Elizabeth went on to have five more sons James G., William, Francis, Herbert J. and Charles E.
I also know that at one point a nephew named James Hand lived with James and Elizabeth in Broughton, Salford, England and that the nephew was the son of Patrick and Harriet Hand who lived in Liverpool, England.  I do not know if Patrick was John or Elizabeth's brother.
I would be grateful if you had some suggestions as to what my next step would be to continue the search for both John and Elizabeth's family and roots without any other pertinent information which has been made even more difficult seeing as both have the same last name.

Films received in the 7 days ending 15 March 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 12 April 2007

 

Film Content

Film No

DEU Emigration Card File 1784-1785

1327508

DEU Emigration Index Schneider - Tram

1326496

DEU WPRU Gruppe PRs Births 1867-1881

0245600

DEU WPRU Gruppe PRs Marrs 1854-1883

0245602

DEU WUE Kirkenbuck PRs 1553 - 1974

1340217

ENG DEV Hartland Land Tax 1716-1832

1471064

ENG DEV Hartland Land Tax 1780-1816

1471063

ENG LDN Grocers Co Records 1345-1881

1850673

FRA BAS Hatten BMD Index 1813-1862

0731409

IRL CAV Kilmore 1901 Census

0812125

IRL CAV Kilmore 1911 Census

2029028

JAM St Anns Marriages 1880 - 1890

1389334

PHL Pangasthan S'Manuel Bths 1922-6

1778187

PHL San Juan La Union Bths 1922-32

1748578

SCT KCD Ternian Banchory pr

0993308

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

Were you aware…………..

 

Scotland . Most of you will be familiar with the term “my last will and testament” i.e. the document where you set out your wishes for the disposal of your assets upon your death and that, I believe, is the general understanding of the term. Not so in Scotland. According to “ Scotland’s People” http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk a testament is a document drawn up by the court confirming the appointment of the executor of the estate. But, according to the National Archives of Scotland www.nas.gov.uk/guides/wills.asp a testament is the collective term used to describe all the documents relating to the executry of a deceased person. And that is only the beginning of the confusing terms surrounding wills in Scotland.

 

Testament testamentar is equivalent to the English Grant of Probate i.e. it gives the executor the right to dispose of the deceased’s property according to the terms of the will. Where no will exists the testament dative equates to the English Letters of Administration.

 

In Scotland an individuals property was divided into Heritable Property i.e. land and buildings, and Moveable Property consisting of everything else. Until 1964 Heritable Property would pass to the eldest son unless (from 1868) the will specified otherwise. However it was not until the 20 th Century that property ownership began to become widespread in Scotland, prior to that all of the land was owned by just 3% of the population. However, there are over 600,000 wills and testaments indexed on Scotland’s People covering the period 1514 to 1901, nearly all of which will contain an inventory of an individuals assets and naming the executor. Searching the index is free of charge and you can download copies of the documents for a standard charge of £5.00.

 

To throw in another confusing term, The Calendar of Confirmations has nothing to do with a church ceremony but again roughly equates to the English Probate Indexes. From 1876 to 1936 is covered by LDS microfiche starting with fiche no. 6068884 which we have in the Toronto Family History Centre and which will indicate where the probated documents are located. From 1937 to the present day we would need to get our friendly Edinburgh researcher to identify the death and find any will or testament that might exist. Contact us if you need this help.

 

The Calendar of Confirmations is tremendously informative and one must not think that only the wealthy are to be found there.

Take this as an example from the 1902 Calendar of Confirmations:

 

"WINTER, Jane Macfarlane or (note maiden name is given), sometime residing at 84 High Street, Ayr latterly at 31 Queen's Terrace there widow of Robert Winter Ironmonger died 16 March 1902 testate.  Inventory given up at Ayr 3 December by Margaret Mcfarlane or Urie, 31 Queen's Terrace aforesaid, widow, Executrix nominated in will or deed dated 8 May 1900 and recorded in Court Books of Commissariot of Ayr 5 December 1902.  Value of Estate £10."

 

I will refrain from going on about other strange sounding indexes such as the Services of Heirs and the Register of Sasines but I can’t help advising you that the Register of Inhibitions is not some strange Scottish custom of recording an individual’s oddities but is the listing of the writs whereby a debtor is prohibited from selling or burdening his property!

 

England and Wales. Local Register Office Indexes to Post-1837 BMDs . James Thomson writes: “Anyone researching births, marriages or deaths (BMDs) registered in England or Wales after July 1, 1837, will soon be familiar with the quarterly indexes to such events produced by the General Register Office (GRO) or by others using data from the GRO (including FreeBMD and Ancestry). Easier to overlook, perhaps, is a growing body of indexes to the registers in which such BMDs were originally entered, namely those of the local register offices.

 

There is an excellent starting point for finding available indexes to local registers, at www.ukbmd.org.uk . It briefly describes the relationship between the local registers and the (national) GRO registers which were compiled from them, and refers the reader to a very good article which notes the perils of relying on the current GRO indexes: www.lfhhs.org.uk/help/factsh/lbmd.htm After reading these descriptions, one might well feel inclined to see whether an index to local registers is also available for the region in which one would like to search, and the place to start is by clicking the “Local BMD” button near the top left of the UK BMD home page (above).

 

It will quickly become apparent that the available indexes cover various types of geographic unit (some large, some small) and various date ranges, and are structured in different ways (though at least eight use software developed for the indexing project in Cheshire, and it is possible to search across all of the eight indexes at once). Nonetheless, it won't take long to get a sense of what is available, and the reward could be locating an entry which had long proved elusive in trolling through GRO indexes (or locating such an entry more easily – some of the indexes are fully searchable, by name, for part or all of the period (notably 1915-1983) for which certain indexes based on the GRO registers are merely browseable).

 

Having said all this, one must not fail to salute the splendid work which continues to be done by volunteers transcribing the GRO indexes through FreeBMD; to see exactly where the project now stands, click on the hyperlinks on http://www.freebmd.org.uk/progress.shtml to the birth, marriage and death coverage charts. In a future Bulletin, I'll outline three pending developments respecting GRO indexes generally.”

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Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 10/2007

Every week we try to include in the Bulletin some informative items, usually in the Were you aware............ section.  All readers are invited to contribute to this section.  If you have a piece of information that you feel would be of interest to other readers, please submit it.

 

In this Bulletin

 

Announcements

Additions to our Permanent Collections

The Forum

Answers to Previous Questions

Q1/08/2007.  England.  What happened to the children of Snowden Temple after they were orphaned in 1841? We regret we still have not got any definitive answers to this question.  However we suggest that as Snowden's wife, Sarah Simpson, seems to have established settlement in West Acklam, Yorkshire, you investigate whether she had siblings in that area and for the females, if any, try to discover who they married.  We will publish any further details we are able to obtain.

Q1/09/2007. UK/Canada/USA.  Is it possible to find schooling and/or other professional records for doctors, lawyers etc?  Although one finds the occasional record of professionals both on LDS films and on-line there doesn't seem to be any continuous run of records.  When I have hit this problem in the past I have been successful in obtaining details from the professional associations such as the British Medical Association and from the details they have provided I have established the name of the university they attended.  Most professional associations publish directories of their current members. 

Q2/09/2007.   England & Wales.  Certificates provided by the GRO appear to be all in the same hand.  How can I obtain a certificate showing the 'real' signatures?    1)        The local registration offices copied – either by hand or typewritten – the entries made in their registers and sent them to the GRO.  Certificates issued by the GRO are photocopies of these copied entries so none of them will show the hand writing or signatures of the parties involved. 2)        You don't have to order certificates from the GRO - you can order them from the registration office responsible for the area in which the original certificate was issued. You may be lucky in being able to get a birth or death certificate with the original signatures if the local registration office provides photocopies of the original register entries but most of these offices issue handwritten/typed copies of the original – you should enquire which method they use before placing an order.3)        In the case of a marriage occurring in a Parish Church, LDS filmed copies of the register are often available.  Consult the Family History Library Catalog to see if the filmed Parish Register covers the event you are interested in.  A problem with this is that the registration district shown in the GRO indexes will usually cover a number of parishes and so you will need to be sure which parish the marriage took place in.

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 8 March 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 5 April 2007.

Film Content

Film No

DEU Repat Germans GenealogicalData

1797311

ENG IOM Marr Dissent Indx 1884-1964

0454953

ENG IOM Marriage Index 1884-1964

0454951

ENG YRK Otley pr

0918402

NDL Rotterdam Marriage Intent 1868

1339142

NDL Rotterdam Marriage Intent 1909

1748840

NDL Strijen Marriage Intent 1837-1838

0120829

NDL Strijen Marriage Intent 1863-1867

1337427

SCT Service of Heirs 1852

0231429

 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

Were you aware...................

 

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  Toronto Family History Centre Bulletin 09/2007

We apologise for the late despatch of this Bulletin.  Weather conditions yesterday evening dictated that it was prudent to stay at home.

 
In this Bulletin
 
 
Announcements
The Forum
Answers to Previous Questions.
Q1/08/2007 (The Snowden Temple question).  We have put in quite a bit of work on this but are puzzled by certain aspects. We hope to publish the results next week.
New Questions
Q1/09/2007.  UK/Canada/USA.   Is it possible to find schooling and/or other professional records for doctors, lawyers, etc.?
If so, where would one look for them? Is there a general index? (Our questioner did not say which countries were being referred to - we made this limitation).Q2/09/2007.  England. I had always (naively) thought that, the certificates ordered from the GRO were photocopies of the original. And therefore the (informant & bride & groom) signatures on the certificates were actually the signatures of my ancestors. However, looking closely at them I conclude that all the fields are written by the same person.So my question is - what actually are the certificates received from the GRO? Are they photocopies of transcriptions of the original? If so, who did the transcription & when? Can one actually obtain a copy of the original, with the 'real' signatures? Films received in the 7 days ending 1 March 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 29 March 2007.
 
 
Film Content Film No
DEU Offenback RC PR 1691-1798 0466715
ENG DUR Auckland-St And. Bap 1813- 0434938
ENG DUR Auckland-St And. Bap 1856- 0434939
ENG DUR Auckland-St And. Mar 1845- 0434936
ENG WO 69/8 Desc Bks 1843-1851 0866534
ENG YKS Dewsbury PR 1798-1821 0990587
SCT ANS Mains & Strathm'tn PR 1740- 0993489
WLS DEN Wrexham BTs 1710-1823 0104827

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 

News from the trenches .

33 were 15 years old

35 were 14 years old

27 were 13 years old

12 were 12 years old

6 were 11 years old and 1 was just 10 years old.

So what heinous crime did 10 year old George Davey, born in Richmond, commit? He stole 2 tame rabbits and was sentenced to 1 month hard labour.

Then there was 13 year old Henry Munday born in Clapham who stole 14lbs of sugar who was sentenced to 4 days hard labour and a whipping.

James William Hempson age 13 born in Surrey stole a box of figs and got 4 days hard labour and 10 strokes of the birch. Henry Miller age 15 born in the Borough stole a loaf of bread and got 10 days hard labour and a whipping

The short sentences of 4 and 10 days seem always to be accompanied by the sentence of a whipping or a birching. In the case of birching the number of strokes was defined but not so the whipping. The longer sentences of up to 3 months hard labour were usually accompanied by a sentence of a period in a reformatory school of up to 5 years duration. John Greening age 11 born in Mortlake got 1 month hard labour and 5 years reformatory for stealing a quart of growing gooseberries.

The girls were not subjected to corporal punishment but their period of hard labour and reformatory was much the same as the boys. Sarah Coker age 13 got 1 month hard labour and 4 years reformatory for cheating (not defined) while Mary Ann Anscombe who was 13 when she stole a pencil case got 1 month hard labour and 5 years reformatory.

But the saddest case of all to my mind is poor 12 year old George Page whose offence

was that he was a vagrant and was wandering abroad with no visible means of subsistence. He got 1 month hard labour and 5 years reformatory.

 

Were you aware...........................

 

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours 

 

Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m. 

Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 

Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.

Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 

Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon.

 

 

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Questions for The Forum still required.  This Bulletin now goes out to nearly 400 people - there's probably someone among them who knows the answer to your problem.
 
In this Bulletin
Announcements
The Forum
 
Answer to Previous Question
Q1/07/2007. Scotland/Canada/USA. George Porter lived in Chapman Township, Ontario, and apparently died between 1891 and 1901 but I can find no record of his death in Ontario.  However, he might have died in Seattle, Washington where civil death records did not start until 1907.  How do I find a record of his death?  Firstly, we think you should make absolutely sure that George did not die in Ontario.  We have come across many examples of bizarre indexing with, for example, the surname having an incorrect first letter and the rest of the surname thoroughly mangled.  But Ancestry.ca (available for use free of charge at the Toronto Family History Centre) allows you to search over a number of fields.  For example, by putting in just the first name, George, the death year 1896 + or - 5 years and "Scotland" in the keyword will produce all the Georges born in Scotland who died in Ontario from 1891 to 1901.  Having satisfied yourself that Seattle is a more likely venue for his death you can contact the King County, Washington archives on www.metrokc.gov/health/vital_st/ to see if they can help.  Barbara Billing writes "

Washington State has a website, "Washington Secretary of State"  http://www.secstate.wa.gov/  research on line for some documents. The State Archives and Library have been very useful in my own genealogy search. Just click on "Library" then click on "Ask a Librarian"". New Questions

Q1/08/2007.  England.   Snowden TEMPLE was born in Bridport, Dorset June 18,1806. His father , a weaver, had relocated to Bridport c 1800 from North Yorkshire. I next find Snowden Temple marrying Sarah SIMPSON  May 12, 1832 in West Acklam Middlesboro . The 1841 CENSUS found him in Dudley, Worcester, Freebodies with 2 little girls, Mary, aged 7 years and Ellen aged 5 years-- all NOT  born in this county --no sign of a spouse.

 A subsequent search found that Sarah ,his wife ,had died 18th of June 1840,  6 week old  old Lydia  had died 14th of June, 1840, 2 year old Ann had died 16th of June 1840.  To make matters worse Snowden died  8th of October, 1841 of "a bursting of  a blood vessel in a natural way by the visitation of God"
This left the 2 little girls now aged 8 and 6 as orphans. Snowden had other siblings--maybe they took the girls in, but how does one  locate an Ellen and Mary Temple  any place in England?? I have searched the 1851 CENSUS without any success-- Mary and Ellen Temple are very common names.  I do not know if their mother, Sarah ,had family--the girls might have gone with one of the Simpson family. Would they have gone into a Poor House? Now I am lost. Any suggestions?
Q2/08/2007.  England. Charles Robert John Edwards: 1850-1921: 2nd Great Grandfather Known facts Birth Certificate showing birth in Hammersmith. Father shown as William Henry Edwards an artist and mother as Sarah Anne Edwards formerly Field. Missing was William Henry’s middle name of Foreman.  Marriage Certificate showing marriage to Emma Han of Crewkerne Somerset. Children: including Henry Hann my Grandfather shown in the census, by birth certificates and as known by family members William Henry Foreman Edwards: 1820 - ?: 3rd Great Grandfather Known facts 1851 Census shows him as proprietor of a drawing academy born in Hammersmith. His family includes Charles (Robert John) then aged 1 year also born Hammersmith. His age however is given as either 31 or 36 which means, if it is 36 that he was born in 1815 not 1808. Sarah Anne would have been only 16 at the time of marriage as she is indicated to be 29 and therefore born 1822. Question: could 16 be ‘Of full age?.” Is this a serious concern about the dates – how accurate was the recording of ages in the 51 census? Marriage Certificate of November 1838 shows marriage to Sarah Anne Field daughter of John Field. Both are recorded as “Of  full age”. His residence is shown as Acton. Certificate does not include his Foreman middle name. It shows his father as Robert Edwards, an artist. Sarah Edwards from information of monumental inscriptions at St.Pauls, Hammersmith was buried in 1854 aged 34 so that would make her born 1820. This is a variance with the census record by about 2 years. Parish registers for St.Pauls Hammersmith show various baptisms of their children with the father a ‘drawing master’ married to Sarah Anne. Interestingly there are various artists living in Hammersmith having children baptized including Richard Dyer who named his child Wilmot (see Robert Edwards’s child Elizabeth Wilmot) and in 1837 a Noah Foreman married a Catherine Edwards. Possibly coincidental but perhaps the families were friendly or connected in some way. The Royal Academy of Arts book “A complete dictionary of contributors and their work from its foundation in 1769 to 1904” shows a W H Edwards exhibiting from 1783 to 1848 with paintings of various floral subjects. The addresses given range from Kensington Gore; Clapham Rise, Surrey and later Hammersmith.  The Victoria & Albert Museum has a book in their collection “A young artists guide to flower drawer and painting in watercolours” by William Henry Edwards” published in 1820. It seems most unlikely that this William Henry was publishing a book when still a child and clearly he could not have exhibited in 1783 some 25 years before his birth. This suggests there were at least two William Henry Edwards. Perhaps Robert Edwards had a brother William Henry? Or could William Henry be the father of Robert and Grandfather of  William Henry Foreman?
Robert Edwards circa. 1780? - ? Known facts:  Robert Edwards married to Mary shows up in St.Paul’s Hammersmith parish register with various baptisms including William Henry Foreman born 14 July 1808 and baptized August 14 of that year. The father is shown as an artist. Other children of the artist Robert and his wife Mary included Robert Charles Augustus, Elizabeth Wilmot, Jenetta Marriot and John Heelas.  A marriage is recorded between Robert Edwards and Mary Heelas in St.Marylebone in 1799. No record of his birth has yet been found in Hammersmith. A preliminary search of the large number of Robert Edwards’s in the census of 1841 and 1851 has not yet turned up his birth.  The Royal Academy of Arts book “A complete dictionary of contributors and their work from its foundation in 1769 to 1904” shows him as a painter exhibiting a painting of ‘Landscape and cattle’ in 1820. At the time he was living at 31, Brownlow Street (in Clerkenwell). Interestingly another artist S.R.W Edwards also a painter of the same address exhibited in 1818 and 1822. Possibly his wife? The Allgemeinse Lexikon der Bildeden Kunstler mentions a R Edwards as a copper engraver on a work in 1795 and goes on to say that this artist may be the same as a copper engraver whose mark “RE.1784” and “Edwards 1788” might be the same artist. The Edwards’s seem to have moved around but never straying far. from Clapham Rise (presumably near today’s Clapham just south of the Thames adjacent to Battersea) to Clerkenwell just north of the present City of London to nearby St.Marylebone then Kensington and just further west in Hammersmith. There is also a brief period in Turnham Green a bit further west from Hammersmith.  There was a famous artist and copper engraver William Camden Edwards (1777 – 1855) active at this time but it seems he neither married nor had children. Nor is there information to suggest he had siblings who were artists.
  1. Is there any concern with this part of my tree to date?
  2. Can anyone suggest further research, in particular where to look for Robert Edwards?
 Films received in the 7 days ending 22 February 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 22 March 2007.

 
Film Content Film No
CAN ON Kingston St Mary RC pr 1298763
CAN ON Ottawa Notre Dame RC pr 1301761
CAN ON Richmond Lutheran pr 0376935
ENG LAN Ashton-Makerfield bur 1745- 1885662
ENG SAL Oswestry BT 1778-1827 0501462
ENG SAL Oswestry BT 1827-1853 0501463
ENG SAL Trefonen BT 1821-1855 0503514
ENG YKS Scruton PR 1849407
IOM Kirk Braddan PR 1849-1883 0106186
POL Krasnik Jewish B D 1866-1875 1496889
POL Krasnik Jewish Births 1850-1865 0715441
RUS BES Kishinev Lutheran B 1900-09 2161880
USA IL Will Co. Probate Records 0873529
USA WI Grant Co. Marriages 1842-1850 1266982

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes. 

Were you aware……………… United Kingdom.  Documents on Line.  The UK National Archives site continues to increase the number of documents that are available for downloading on-line all at a standard charge of £3.50 (about $8.00) regardless of the number of pages.  However, one can obtain quite a lot of information completely free of charge just by consulting the indexes. To access these documents go www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/  . Here are the records that are available and likely to be of most interest to family researchers.Wills.  Over 1 million wills proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury from 1384 to 1858.  The free of charge index will give you the full name, the date the will was proved and the occupation of the decedent.Death Duties.  Over 71,000 wills and letters of administration proved in the “country courts” i.e. not the PCC or PCY from 1796 to 1811.  The index shows full name, occupation and date of probate.World War 1 Campaign Medals.  Over 5,460,000 entries.  Since virtually everybody who served overseas in World War 1 received at least one medal this is the most complete record of the names of the people involved in this war.  The index gives the person’s name (often with a second given name or initial) the regiment and the regimental number.Royal Navy Seamen.  Over 500,000 entries for men who joined the Royal Navy between 1873 and 1923.  The index shows date and place of birth against each entry.  The on-line document provides the seaman’s service record.Royal Navy Division.  There were more men in the navy during WW1 than there were ships requiring them and so the Royal Navy Division, which was in effect a part of the army was formed.  The service records of over 50,000 officers and men are available on-line with the index showing the full name, rank and service number and date (but not place) of birth.Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps.  The service records of over 7,000 women who joined the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps between 1917 and 1918, later Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps between 1918 and 1920 are available on-line.  The index shows date and place of birth.World War 2 Merchant Seamen’s Medals.  Over 108,000 entries of medals awarded to Merchant Seamen from 1946 to 2002.  Each entry gives details of the seaman’s name, discharge book number and medals awarded.  Index, for the most part, shows full name and date of birth. And, if you are really lucky(?)Victorian Prisoners Photograph Albums.  If your ancestor happened to be in Wandsworth Prison between 1872 and 1873 you can get on-line a photograph of them together with details of their crime.  Even the index shows their age, place of birth, their offence and their sentence. 

United Kingdom. First World War British Army WO 364 Soldiers' Papers 

James Thomson writes: “Ancestry.com has been working with The National Archives (TNA) (at Kew) to digitise British Army First World War soldiers' papers, including those in series WO 364 (the "unburnt documents"). The contents of this series and other First World War soldiers' papers are described in the TNA Research Guide at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/RdLeaflet.asp?sLeafletID=18 (it may be necessary to click twice on this hyperlink to get the correct Research Guide to load). Note that both WO 364 and the larger series WO 363 (known as the "burnt documents") contain the papers of non-commissioned officers and "other ranks" only; the records of commissioned officers are not included in these series.

Ancestry has just uploaded an initial group of records, from the series WO 364 only, to their new British Army WWI Pension Records 1914-1920 collection. The database as it currently stands is described at http://content.ancestry.co.uk/iexec/?htx=List&dbid=1114, and consists of nominal indexes linked to digital images of WO 364 records for soldiers whose surnames began with the letters A or B. Coverage of the rest of the alphabet is promised for the next release. Ancestry's description of this collection is well worth reading (as is the TNA Research Guide, above), to get a sense of what is included and to obtain an understanding of some important caveats which must be borne in mind when looking for First World War soldiers' papers in WO 364 and elsewhere. (Note that I believe that there is an error in the sentence in Ancestry's description which includes the statement "all surviving service and pension records were digitised by The National Archives"; for "digitised" read "microfilmed".) The database can be accessed both through the Ancestry subscriptions at the Family History Centres (including Don Mills) and through the Toronto Public Library's subscription to AncestryLibraryEdition.

If one finds an index entry of interest, the digital image to which one is taken when one clicks on “View original image” should be the front of the first form in the set of records for that soldier; to see the next image, click on the “Next” icon (a right-pointing arrow) immediately above the displayed image. To see the entire set of images for the soldier, continue doing this; the end of the set of papers relating to that soldier is indicated by an image of a card reading “Next File”. Don't be surprised if the soldier's papers contain what appear to be duplicate copies of the same form; there may be some subtle differences between them.   The estimates of the number of soldiers (NCOs and "other ranks") in the British Army in the First World War range up to 7 million (or more), and there are said to be records for about 750,000 of these in WO 364 and records for about 2 million in WO 363; in consequence, it is generally said that there are extant soldiers' papers for about 40% of those who served (papers for the other 60% having been destroyed by fire as a result of bombing in the Second World War). It is worth noting that records of those who served in (or, to be more precise, whose service ended with) the Household Cavalry are not in WO 363 or WO 364, but rather are in TNA series WO 400. Further, the records of those who served with the Grenadier Guards, Coldstream Guards, or Scots, Irish or Welsh Guards remain with the headquarters of the Foot Guards regiments and hence do not comprise any series at TNA. This is important for me, for instance, as the Coldstream Guards are one of the regiments in which my family members served. The records of the Household Cavalry should all be available, while the records of the Foot Guards did suffer some losses in the Second World War. Also not included in either WO 363 or WO 364 are the records of soldiers who remained in the British Army after 1920; such records are with the Ministry of Defence.

For such First World War service records of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps as survive (only about 7,000 out of the original 57,000), see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/waac.asp, and for First World War service records of men as well as officers of the Royal Naval Division (not the Royal Navy), see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/royalnavaldivision.asp .

The records that have just been uploaded by Ancestry will give a taste of the varied and illuminating records which may be found among the British Army First World War soldiers' papers. The availability online for the first time of a comprehensive nominal index to extant records in WO 364 (even if only, for the time being, for surnames beginning with A or B), linked to digital images of the records themselves, is a splendid advance.”

 

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. 

Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

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Back to normal this week with lots of films arriving and more additions to our permanent collections.  But we could do with some more questions for The Forum so please, send us details of that brick wall.
 
In this Bulletin
Announcements

Additions to our Permanent Collections

            Annesley 1599-1812

            Bulwell 1635 – 1812            Bunny 1556 – 1818            Hucknall Torkard 1559 – 1812            Langar 1596 – 1812            Radford 1563 – 1812

The Forum New QuestionQ1/07/2007.  Scotland/Canada/USA
My great grandfather George Porter was born in Glamis, Scotland c1849 the son of John Porter and Margaret Gray.
In the 1870's George emigrated to Canada together with his parents and most of his siblings and settled in the Chapman Township area, Parry Sound District.  George returned to Scotland, briefly it seems, to marry Mary Anne Williamson in 1881. George and Mary Anne are on the 1891 Census for Chapman Township together with their two daughters, but by the 1901 Census Mary Anne is shown as a widow.  However, an 1895 land assessment record shows the owner as "Mrs G. Porter, Seattle, Washington Territory, USA".  I can't find a death record for George in Ontario so maybe he died in Washington. I understand that civil registration did not begin in Washington until 1907 so how do I find a death record for him?  Two brothers of George, James and David also disappeared around the same time so maybe they went to Washington too.

 

Films received in the 7 days ending 15 February 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 15 March 2007

 
Film Content Film No
CAN ON Dundas County 1851 Census 0349202
CAN ON Dundas County 1861 Census 0349255
CAN ON Matilda/Wills'burg 1871 Cen 0349187
CAN ON Mount'n/Winchester 1871 Cen 0349188
DEU Gen Handbook of Nobility 0492077
DEU PRE Lauschied PR 1756-1939 1336849
DEU PRE Osche BMD 1878-1881 1417576
DEU PRE Tilsit marriages 1853-1874 1813539
DEU PRE Wasleben BMD 1878-1883 1733800
ENG DEV Throwleigh PR/BT 1606-1837 0917539
ENG DOR Yetminster BTs 1579-1880 1239263
ENG GLS Bitton PRs 1595499
ENG HRT Pirton PR 1560-1914 1040655
ENG HRT Pirton PR M 1837-1909 1040816
ENG KEN Minster in Sheppey PR 2228363
ENG MDX St Martin in Fields PR 1653- 0560370
ENG WOR Kidderminster bap mar 1820- 0435267
ENG YRK Huddersfield pr 1793-1819 0990694
IND Bengal Baptisms 1873 July/Sept. 0499051
ITA Gerace Births 1842-1858 1518214
PHL Meycauagan Bulacan Bapt 1911- 1128524
POL RZ Surochów Gr Cath marr 1785- 2380083
SCT SUT Farr PR 1790-1854 0990562
UKR Burgthal BMD 1787-1833 2328822
USA NY NY Bride Card Index 1889W-1893 Dy 1379090
 
A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.
 

 Were you aware…………. 

Mr. Waller describes how the Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, having been established in America in 1830 began sending missionaries to England in 1837.  Such was their success that there was a period in the next decade when there were more members of the Church in Britain than there were in America.  The British members were encouraged to emigrate to America and the Church set up an office in Liverpool to assist them.  The peak period was between 1851 and 1860 when 37,215 people converted to the Mormon Church and 12,972 members emigrated to America.  In 1848 the Church had decided to set up its headquarters in Salt Lake City and this is where most of the emigrants headed generally sailing from Liverpool to New Orleans.  The journey was arduous to say the least.  The trip across the Atlantic usually took 4 to 6 weeks.  This was followed by a 1,300 mile steamboat journey up the Mississippi, an 800 mile journey on the Missouri followed by 1,030 miles by wagon or by pulling a hand cart to Salt Lake City.  From Liverpool to Salt Lake averaged a 5 month journey but by the mid-1860’s with the advent of the steamship and the railways the journey time was cut to 3 or 4 weeks.  By 1894 the Church was encouraging their British members to remain at home and build up the church in Britain so that in the first decade of the 20th Century LDS emigrants to America totaled only 3,615. We have in the Toronto Family History Centre a CD, The Mormon Immigration Index, containing details of 93,000 LDS emigrants from Europe, mostly British. Also given on this CD are details of their journey and personal accounts. Even if, like Linda, you have no knowledge of a Mormon ancestor it can only take a few minutes to check out this CD.  The records of the Mormon church in Britain are amazingly detailed.  The following is an extract from the film that Linda ordered in – and remember, this event pre-dates civil registration in Scotland:From Glasgow Conference LDS List of members that have died in the Glasgow Branch. "Died of cholera at the house of Elder Thomas Stewart, 44 Thistle Street Gorbals Glasgow on Thursday 16th January 1849.  Sister Elizabeth Murray  after an illness of 11.5 hours aged 17 years 3 months 10days and Sister Mary Murray after an illness of 10 hours and much beloved by a large circle of the Stake for their faithfulness and their affection for each other.  They loved each other in their lives and in their deaths were not divided.  They were both laid in the grave in Lair No. 333 Gorbals churchyard where they received assurance of a glorious resurrection.  Age of Sister Mary 20 years 8 months and 24 days".

  
Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.
Email:  Toronto_FHC@bellnet.ca

 

 

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A rather different Bulletin this week - no films have arrived, no new questions have been sent in for The Forum, we've finished listing all the Phillimore's Parish records and we have very little to report under Additions to our Permanent Collections and in News from the trenches.  Nonetheless we have plenty to tell you
 
In this Bulletin
 
All in Were you aware...................
  • Shot at dawn.  The horrific story of Canadian soldiers executed in WW1.
  • Up before the beak.  What you can expect to find in Petty Sessions, Quarter Sessions and Assize records.
  • Scotland's People.  New material on this invaluable website.
  • UK Outbound Passengers.  A huge expansion of the data available.
Additions to our Permanent Collections.
 
England, Lancashire, Bolton.  We extend our grateful thanks to Al Haslett who has donated a beautiful old book The Registers of the Parish Church of Bolton published in 1913 by the Lancashire Parish Register Society. It covers Baptisms for 1573-4 and 1590-1660, Marriages for 1573 and 1587-1660 and Burials for 1573-4 and 1587-1660.  Al spotted the book being used as a display item in a furniture store and the owner willingly agreed to give it to him.
 
News from the Trenches.
  • Paul Branson writes confessing that he is an incorrigible rat pack and tells us "Then one day around the end of January 2007 some of my lead turned to gold.  I had spent two hours in the FHC last November recording births for a surname matching a remote branch of my family not knowing whether these were relatives or not.  I pencilled in five years of pre WW1 info year by year, quarter by quarter, and then thinking my time wasted, I dutifully deposited it in the "file of last resort".  At that time I started corresponding with a member of that family who had been desperately looking for the birth of a child who may have died in infancy.  Yes, I had heard of a baby boy named Edward.  Yes, it was around 1915.  Yes the mothers maiden name was Tyler, and since I had the page and volume number it was a short five days later that the certificate arrived from the GRO confirming the event.  It did satisfy the families need to know, and I was a Pack Rat Hero"
  • And Linda Reid writes concerning her new-found Mormon ancestor " In the 1851 census in Glasgow Mary Methven was age 52, born in Dundee. In the register of LDS members for the Glasgow Conference in 1852 (on a film I have from the FHL) she was listed as born 15 September 1797 in Arbroath. There is an extracted entry on the IGI for that (Mary Gowans)". (In next week's Bulletin we will be including a piece on the Mormons in Britain in the 1800's - their numbers exceeded the Mormons in Utah).
Were you aware...................
 

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. 

Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

                                                                               

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We could do with some new questions for The Forum - please send in your queries.
 
In this Bulletin
  • Saint, Sinner, Slattern or Stiff.  Let's face it, everyone fits into one or more of those categories either during their lifetime or shortly thereafter and the chances are that your 19th & 20th Century UK ancestors got their names in the newspapers.  See Were you aware................
  • 30 June 1922.  A day of infamy - but not as bad as some would have it. See Were you aware...............
  • Montreal directories.  See Answers to Previous Questions in The Forum.
Additions to our Permanent Collections
  • England.  The final listing of the Phiilimore's Parish Records full details of which were given in Bulletin 01/2007.

ENG SAL Battlefield Baptisms 1663-1812

ENG SAL Battlefield Burials 1663-1812

ENG SAL Battlefield Marriages 1663-1812

ENG SFK Capel St. Mary Marriages 1588-1837

ENG SFK Combs Marriages 1568-1837

ENG SFK Exning Marriages 1558-1812

ENG SFK Great Wenham Marriages 1670-1837

ENG SFK Little Wenham Marriages 1567-1812

ENG SFK Martlesham Marriages 1653-1837

ENG SFK Thrandeston Marriages 1559-1812

ENG SOM Aller Marriages 1560-1812

ENG SOM Charlton Adam Marriages 1707-1812

ENG SOM Charlton Mackrell Marriages 1575-1812

ENG SOM High Ham Marriages1569-1812

ENG SOM Huish Episcopi Marriages 1698-1812

ENG SOM Kingsdon Marriages 1540-1812

ENG SOM Langport Marriages 1728-1812

ENG SOM Long Sutton Marriages 1559-1812

ENG SOM Muchelney Marriages1703-1812

ENG SOM Northover Marriages 1531-1812

ENG SOM Taunton, St. Mary Magdalene 1558-1728

ENG SRY Richmond Baptisms 1583-1720

ENG SRY Richmond Burials 1583-1720

ENG SRY Richmond Marriages 1583-1720

ENG WIL Alderton Marriages 1606-1812

ENG WIL Grittleton Marriages 1573-1812

ENG WIL Kingston Deverill Marriages 1706-1812

ENG WIL Leigh Delamere Marriages1735-1812

ENG WIL Mere Marriages 1561-1812

ENG WIL Monkton Deverill Marriages 1749-1812

ENG WIL Salisbury St. Martin Marriages 1559-1812

ENG WIL Sherston Magna Marriages1653-1812

ENG WIL Sopworth Marriages1698-1812

ENG YKS Rotherham Marriages 1540-1798

 
The Forum
 
Answers to Previous Questions.
 
Q1/04/2007 England (appeared incorrectly as Q1/04/2006).  Henry Leamy died in 1939 in Westminster his death certificate describing him as a playwright's agent.  Are there pre-war theatre/stage records/directories or other sources that may have records of his activities?  Terry Russell writes:-  "The Toronto Reference Library, Arts Section, does have a good collection of theatre/musical directories and various theatrical biographical and obituary references, as well as other sources. Most particularly, your enquirer should scour the annual issues of (a) John Parker's 'Who's Who in the Theatre', and (b) 'ERA Almanack', which
variously contain BMDs, advertisements for theatrical agents  and services, etc., and titles, plots, managers, casts and itineraries for London productions and provincial touring companies.   It's long odds, but, as in my own case, once you can get the first sighting one can usually go on."
 
Q2/04/2007 Canada (appeared incorrectly as Q2/04/2006).  The Montreal Gazette for Friday 6 January 1899 shows an advertisement for "Emblem Bros., Bill Discounters, 41 St. Francois Xavier St. Montreal".  How can I find out who was involved in this business?.  Your editor writes:  As this was not an Incorporated business there is not likely to be any record of its formation.  Nevertheless I was able to discover by referring to various Montreal city directories that the Emblems involved in the business (there could have been other people with different surnames) were Alfred and Joseph Emblem and a G. Emblem.  The business was described as Real Estate, Financial and General Agents.  By 1910 the business seemed to no longer exist but at this time there was a Tom Emblem operating as a Real Estate Agent and an Arthur Emblem as an accountant.  Earlier, in 1894-1897 there was a confectionery business operated by a J.C. Emblem.  One can search Montreal directories for the period 1842 to 1992 on-line at http://bibnum2.bnquebec.ca/bna/lovell/index.html 
 
Films received in the 7 days ending 1 February 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 1 March 2007
 
 
Film Content Film No
DEU Budwethen East Prussia pr 1813544
DEU PRE Schirotzken BMD 1876-1881 1194903
ENG KEN Ospinge PR 1561-1862 1836248
ENG KEN Ospinge PR 1754-1916 1836273
ENG military burnt records WWI 2300827
ENG WW1 Burnt Recs 'Hooker' 2302203
ENG YKS Heptonstall C.Rec 1716-1807 1701997
ENG YKS Heptonstall C.Rec 1784-1815 1736216
ENG YKS Langfield Ch Rec 1707-1826 1736269
ENG YKS Langfield Ch Rec 1826-1870 1736270
ENG YKS Sowerby Ch Rec. 1727-1862 1701727
FRA Alsace Tables de Cannales 1813-62 0777208
PHL Meycauayan PR M 1874-1894 1128527
PHL Meycauayan PR M 1894-1934 1128528
SCT ARG Killean OPR 1762-1855 1041070
UKR L'viv RC Met Bks Indx 1600-1948 2187416
USA NY Erie Co. Deeds 1846 - 1847 0590051
 
A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.
 
Were you aware..................
 
 

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. 

Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

Email:  Toronto_FHC@bellnet.ca
 

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It was our pleasure to welcome to the Family History Centre last Saturday afternoon a large number of people interested in Ukrainian genealogy.  Many were first-time visitors and we very much look forward to seeing them again.
 
In this Bulletin
  • Got an English lunatic ancestor?  Then this Bulletin is for you - see News from the trenches and Were you aware.........
 
Announcements
  • We hear that S&N Genealogy Supplies are offering a free trial access to their databases for a limited time see www.TheGenealogist.co.uk/freesub
  • For a one week period you can obtain a copy of Ryan Taylor's The Canadian Genealogical Sourcebook normally priced at $56.00 for $19.00.  This book is great for anyone wanting to find Canadian genealogical source information quickly.  Go to www.genealogystore.com
Additions to our Permanent Collections
  • Russia.  The Lutherans of Russia.  Parish Index to the church books of the Evangelical Consistory of St. Petersburg 1833-1885 (Fiche No. 6001716)
  • USA.  Some descendants of Hans Adam Moser who came to Philadelphia in 1728 (Fiche No.6018835).
  • Ireland.  The O'Sullivan Book.  (Fiche No. 6036295)
  • England.  A further listing of the Phillimore's Parish Records full details of which were given in Bulletin 01/2007.
ENG MDX Acton Marriages 1566-1812
ENG MDX Greenford Marriages 1539-1812
ENG MDX Hanwell Marriages 1570-1812
ENG MDX Harlington Marriages 1540-1812
ENG MDX Heston Marriages1559-1812
ENG NFK Acle Marriages 1664-1812
ENG NFK Braydeston Marriages 1623-1812
ENG NFK Brundall Marriages 1563-1812
ENG NFK Burlingham St. Andrew Marriages 1540-1812
ENG NFK Burlingham St. Peter Marriages 1560-1812
ENG NFK Calthorpe Marriages 1558-1812
ENG NFK Castle Rising Marriages 1537-1837
ENG NFK Castleacre Marriages 1710-1812
ENG NFK Congham Marriages1581-1837
ENG NFK East Lexham Marriages 1541-1812
ENG NFK Flitcham Marriages 1755-1837
ENG NFK Gaywood Marriages 1658-1837
ENG NFK Grimston Marriages 1552-1837
ENG NFK Hemblington Marriages 1564-1812
ENG NFK Hillington Marriages 1695-1837
ENG NFK Ingworth Marriages 1559-1812
ENG NFK Langley Marriages 1695-1812
ENG NFK Narborough Marriages 1558-1812
ENG NFK North Wootton Marriages 1655-1837
ENG NFK Roydon Marriages 1721-1837
ENG NFK South Wootton Marriages1586-1837
ENG NFK Southacre Marriages 1576-1812
ENG NFK Strumpshaw Marriages 1562-1812
ENG NFK Upton Marriages 1558-1812
ENG NFK Witton by Blofield Marriages 1582-1812
ENG NTT Bingham Marriages 1598-1812
ENG NTT Carcelston Marriages 1570-1812
ENG NTT East Bridgford Marriages 1614-1812
ENG NTT Elton on the Hill Marriages 1593-1812
ENG NTT Flintham Marriages 1629-1812
ENG NTT Granby Marriages 1567-1812
ENG NTT Hawkesworth Marriages 1569-1812
ENG NTT Kneeton Marriages 1592-1812
ENG NTT Orston Marriages 1590-1812
ENG NTT Scarrington Marriages 1571-1812
ENG NTT Screveton Marriages 1640-1812
ENG NTT Thoroton Marriages 1583-1812
ENG NTT Whatton Marriages 1538-1812
 
The Forum
 
Answers to Previous Questions.
 
Q2/03/2007. England.  (Seeking Marriage  of John WRIGHT born c 1808 North Weald, Essex and Alice LINES born 1805 Chipping Warden, Northamptonshire. First child, Alice Elizabeth born 1832 in Epping,Essex, others born 1837 onwards in Kentish Town, London. Have already checked Epping marriages, including Quaker, as well as Chipping Warden).  We think it would be worthwhile checking the North Weald marriages as well.  The parish of North Weald Bassett lies only three miles from Epping so there must be a distinct possibility that that was where they were married.  Unfortunately the parish records for the period in question are not available from the LDS but they are in the Essex County Record Office www.essexcc.gov.uk/ero/ and marriages for North Weald Bassett for the period 1813-1837 have been indexed and are available from them on microfiche at a cost of £1.90 per fiche.  You can email them with regard to the microfiche on ero.reprographic@essexcc.gov.uk
 
Q3/03/2007.  England/Poland.  (My uncle, Antoni Slawinski (1917-1973), in addition of being a Polish Army lieutenant, at some point during the WWII was seconded to the British Army and ended the war in the rank of the British Army captain (I have his picture in the uniform). He served in Africa, and emigrated from South Africa to Canada in 1954. I have very little information to go by. Other than his vital records (birth/death/+parents), I know nothing nor do I have any documents about his army days. But, I was told that judging from his uniform he was in the British Infantry. What steps should I take, where and to whom should I write to get more information about his service in the British Army? ).  The military records of Polish Army Officers who served with the British Army are still held by the U.K. Ministry of Defence see http://www.veteransagency.mod.uk/service_records/non_uk.html  You should be able to get a copy of your uncles record by filling out the SAR form (Subject Access Request) form in a sensible manner and sending it to the address below:
Polish Records.
Royal Navy and Army:
Polish Correspondence Section
Room 28B
RAF Northolt
West End Road
Ruislip
Middlesex
HA4 6NG
Email:
polishastdisoff@northolt.raf.mod.uk
 
New Questions
 
Q1/04/2006.  England.  My great uncle Henry Leamy was born in 1871 in Gloucester.  In 1881 he was living in Salford, Lancs and in 1901 in West Kirby, Lancs where he shown as single, a masseur and male hospital nurse.  He died in 1939 in Westminster, London his death certificate describing him as a playwright's agent.  This fits with the family tradition that he was an actor manager.  The informant on his death certificate was "Y.C.E. Yates" which means nothing to me.  I have not been able to find a marriage registration for him.  Are there pre-war theatre/stage records/directories or other sources that may have records of his activities?
Q2/04/2006.  Canada.  The Montreal Gazette for Friday 6 January 1899 shows an advertisement for "Emblem Bros., Bill Discounters, 41 St. Francois Xavier St. Montreal".  How can I find out who was involved in this business?
 
 
Film received in the 7 days ending 25 January 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 22 February 2007.
 
 
Film Content Film No
CAN ON Simcoe Co Deaths 1934 1838189
 
A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes. News from the trenches
  • Linda Reid tells us that an ancestor, David Methven, left Glasgow in 1853 with other members of his family for New Orleans.  In 1856 they crossed the plains as Mormon Pioneers from Florence (now Omaha, Nebraska) to Utah Territory.  In the 1860 Census he is in Placerville, California, still single and in 1870 he is still in Placerville but married with an 11 month old child.  Natural assumption - he had married in California.  Wrong.  By sheer chance Linda spotted an 1866 marriage for him in the IGI but in Glasgow, Scotland.  The certificate proved undoubtedly that it was the same David.  So having gone through all the hardship of crossing the plains he travelled back to Scotland, married, and returned to California.  Was he sent on a mission back to Scotland?  Perhaps some of our Mormon readers can throw some light on this one.
  • And now your editor has a story to tell.  Many years ago I found my great grandfather, Charles Goddard, in the 1881 Census as an inmate in the Middlesex District lunatic asylum at Hanwell, Middlesex.  His wife was shown as married living with her 6 children in Paddington.  In 1891 she is still shown as married and when she died in 1895 she was described as the wife of Charles Goddard.  However, I could never find the death of Charles.  I knew that in 1890 a number of male patients were transferred from Hanwell to South Weald, Essex but there were no deaths that could account for him in either district.  So I assumed that he had been discharged at some time and died elsewhere but there were too many possibilities.  Recently I discovered that the patient records of the Hanwell Lunatic Asylum were held in the London Metropolitan Archives so I called in a favour and got them searched.  Charles Goddard was admitted to the asylum in 1878 having suffered from melancholia for two years. He died there in 1896 having spent 18 years of his life in the asylum.  Just to add a little poignancy, Charles was born in 1839 in Winchester, Hants.  In 1843 his mother died and his father, seemingly abandoned his family and moved to London, Charles ending up in the workhouse.  His youngest child was born in 1878, 3 weeks after Charles was taken into the asylum.  Not exactly a happy life.
Were you aware...............   

England, Lunatic Asylums and Hospital Records.   The first public insane asylum in England was the Bethlem Royal Hospital in Bishopsgate, London which was admitting mentally ill patients in 1377. It became infamous for the brutal treatment of its patients who were put up as public spectacles.  Visitors were granted free admission on the first Tuesday of each month and were allowed to bring long sticks to prod and enrage the patients.  In 1814 there were 96,000 visitors.  Up until the early 19th Century a patient would normally be chained up or confined in a straight jacketBy the 18th Century there were 7 other public asylums supplemented by many private mad-houses but it was not until 1808 that Parliament agreed to public funding for the public asylums which previously had relied on the parish or charity for support.  In 1845 the Lunacy and County Asylums Act required local authorities to provide public asylums for pauper lunatics.  It didn’t take much to be declared a lunatic which frequently became the fate of people suffering from psychosis, post-natal depression, syphilis, epilepsy or even just learning difficulties.It is usually fairly easy to identify an ancestor confined as a lunatic in the censuses up until 1881 but after that the inmates of asylums were described only by their initials, supplemented in some cases by their birthplace and/or their occupation. If your ancestor was a lunatic there is an excellent website which has details of all the asylums in England at http://www.mdx.ac.uk/WWW/STUDY/4Asylums.htmThe records of the asylums seem to show little more than admission and discharge details of the patient but even so can be of great interest to the researcher.On the National Archives website http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/hospitalrecords/search.asp you can discover what records exist for asylums and hospitals generally.  You can search by the name of the hospital or by the name of the town   In some cases the records are held in major repositories such as the London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) while others are held by Local Health Authorities in archives set up to house them.  The general rule is that patient’s records are closed for 100 years and such a rule would be rigidly applied by the likes of the LMA but I have managed to sweet-talk an archivist holding the record of the birth of a child born in 1946 who was subsequently adopted to give me the details.  She came up with the date the mother entered the hospital and the details she gave of herself, the time she went into labour, the time the baby was born together with its weight, length and sex, and when the mother and baby were discharged.   

 

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. 

Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

Email:  Toronto_FHC@bellnet.ca

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Our thanks to those readers who have sent in questions for The Forum.  These appear below but we still need to keep them coming in.
 
In this Bulletin
  • A tremendous leap forward for those of you with German and Eastern European roots with the arrival on-line at Ancestry.com of new German databases including The Hamburg Passenger Lists - over 5 million records containing a wealth of information - and Meyers Gazetteer of the German Empire.  Details in Were you aware..........
 
Announcements
  • Our open house for people with Ukrainian ancestry takes place on Saturday, 20 January, between 2 and 4 p.m. (and note the timely arrival of The Hamburg Passenger Lists, of particular relevance to East European researchers)
  • The Ontario Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists advise us that the registration date for their Double Header Event for Serious Genealogists which takes place on Saturday, 17 February (see Bulletin 01/2007) has been extended to 9 February.
 
Additions to our Permanent Collections
  • England, Lancashire, Todmorden.  Parish Records.  Baptisms 1670-1780, Marriages 1669-1780, Burials 1666-1780. Fiche No. 6142715
  • England, Phillimore's Parish Records.  Further listing (detailed description in Bulletin 01/2007).
ENG HAM Bentley Marriages 1541-1812
ENG HAM Bramley Marriages 1580-1812
ENG HAM Bullington Marriages 1755-1812
ENG HAM Cliddesden Marriages 1636-1812
ENG HAM Deane Marriages 1679-1812
ENG HAM Dummer Marriages 1541-1812
ENG HAM East Woodhay Marriages 1618-1812
ENG HAM Hartley Wespall Marriages 1558-1812
ENG HAM Hunton Marriages 1575-1812
ENG HAM Hurstbourne Priors Marriages 1604-1812
ENG HAM Hurstbourne Tarrant Marriages 1546-1812
ENG HAM Knight’s Enham Marriages 1683-1812
ENG HAM Laverstoke Marriages 1657-1811
ENG HAM Linkenholt Marriages 1579-1812
ENG HAM Maple Durwell Marriages 1629-1812
ENG HAM Monxton Marriages 1716-1812
ENG HAM Penton Mewsey Marriages 1649-1812
ENG HAM Popham Marriages 1628-1812
ENG HAM Preston Candover Marriages 1584-1812
ENG HAM Sherfield upon Loddon Marriages 1574-1812
ENG HAM St. Mary Bourne Marriages 1663-1812
ENG HAM Steventon Marriages 1604-1812
ENG HAM Stoke Charity Marriages 1542-1812
ENG HAM Tufton Marriages 1754-1812
ENG HAM Wonston Marriages 1570-1812
ENG HAM Woodmancote Marriages 1772-1812
ENG HAM Wootton St. Lawrence Marriages1560-1812
ENG HRT Aldbury Marriages 1694-1812
ENG HRT Barley Marriages 1566-1812
ENG HRT Eastwick Marriages 1556-1812
ENG HRT Great Berkhamsted Marriages 1538-1812
ENG HRT Kensworth Marriages 1615-1812
ENG HRT Letchworth Marriages 1696-1805
ENG HRT Offley Marriages 1654-1812
ENG LEI Bottesford Marriages 1563-1812
ENG LEI Congerston Marriages 1756-1812
ENG LEI Gaddesby Marriages 1563-1812
ENG LEI Muston Marriages 1561-1812
ENG LEI Ratby Marriages 1695-1812
ENG LEI Scraptoft Marriages 1539-1812
ENG LEI Sibson Marriages 1569-1812
ENG LEI Twyford cum Thorpe Satchville Marriages 1562-1812
ENG LIN Spalding Marriages 1550-1812
ENG LND St. James’ Dukes Place Marriages 1664-1683
 
The Forum
New Questions
Films received in the 7 days ending 18 January 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 15 February 2007 
 
Film Content Film No
CAN ON Waterloo Co Marriages 1924 2393915
CAN PQ Montreal 84 Reg Church Rec 2027717
CAN PQ Montreal Christ Church 1766- 1430779
CAN PQ Montreal Garr. Church 1760- 2021269
CAN PQ Montreal St. Gabriels 1779- 1430811
ENG LAN Ringley PR 1719-1841 2356506
ENG LEI Leicester bap 1868-96 0870055
GRD Land & Probate Recs 1913-1918 1563488
ITL Udine Pasiano CivReg 1871-1910 2163264
PHL Binalonan Pangasinan Bapt 1901 1213784
PRT Coimbra Lousa PR Bapt 1621-1743 1446439
PRT Coimbra Lousa PR Dths 1577-1810 1446442
PRT Lisbon Sacramento PR 1638-1725 1529352
SCT LKS Glasgow LDS Recs 1840-54 0104152
USA NY Germantown Luth 1746-1877 0017449
USA NY New York St Pauls 1790-1875 0017443
USA NY New York St Thomas 1705- 0017448
 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.
 

Were you aware.................. Hamburg Passenger Lists, 1850-1934 

James Thomson writes: “I have been enjoying investigating the 1850-1934 Hamburg Passenger Lists in Ancestry's new German collection, and have been interested to read Ancestry's description of this new database. One learns that the lists contain “approximately 5 million records of individuals, approximately 80% of whom were destined for the United States... [and about] 214,000 to Canada... Most of the lists include the last place of residence and often the place of birth as well [emphasis added]. This makes them an enormously valuable source for family history research. Approximately one third of the passengers who departed Hamburg were from Germany, while nearly two thirds came from Eastern Europe, especially in the period from 1880-1914. Among these were approximately 1.2 million people from Russia, Austria-Hungary, Romania, and other countries of southeastern Europe. The records also include about 750,000 Jewish immigrants from Russia, who sailed at this time from Hamburg to the United States.” The database as it stands contains digital images of the extant lists from 1850 to 1934 (there are no lists for the first six months of 1853, or for the war years 1915-1919), and a nominal index with respect to the years 1890-1913. With regard to years not covered by this index, I note that there is a very useful Resource Guide to The Hamburg Passenger Lists, 1850-1934 on the FamilySearch.org site: http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/guide/Hamburg_Pass_List.ASP(click on each of the hyperlinks in the Table of Contents in turn, or download the PDF version http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/images/34047_Hamburg_Pass_List.pdf). The Resource Guide describes other available indexes. I imagine also that current indexes to North American immigration records may also help in locating an individual in Hamburg passenger lists for years other than 1890-1913 (the attraction of consulting the Hamburg lists as well perhaps lying in the fact that more information about last residence and place of birth (see above) may be forthcoming). Both Ancestry and the FamilySearch Resource Guide provide highly interesting additional information about the Hamburg lists, as do webpages such as http://home.att.net/~wee-monster/hamburg.html and http://www.genealogienetz.de/misc/emig/ham_pass.html. The Resource Guide indicates that “Nearly one-third of the people who emigrated from central and eastern Europe [between 1850 and 1934] are included on these lists.” I wonder whether they may be of help to some of the attendees at this Saturday's Open House at the Family History Centre? Another of the databases in Ancestry's German collection is Meyers Gazetteer of the German Empire. There is a helpful FamilySearch Resource Guide called How to Use the Meyers Gazetteer at http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/guide/GER_T4_-_HowtoUsetheMeyersGazetteer.ASP 

The Hamburg Passenger Lists and the Meyers Gazetteer, as well as Ancestry's other new German databases, are also available through the Toronto Public Library's subscription to AncestryLibraryEdition.”

  

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. 

Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

Email:  Toronto_FHC@bellnet.ca

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Can I just remind everyone that we still require questions in order to keep The Forum running.  Do not be shy and certainly don't think you are the only one that doesn't know the answer to your problem. In this Bulletin
  • We draw your attention to the release of indexed passenger lists for vessels leaving the British Isles for overseas ports 1890-1899 in Were you aware.......... News relating to the 1911 Census of England and Wales in Were you aware...........
  • Interesting tales of success - and failure - in News from the trenches
Announcements
  • We remind you once again of the open-house at the Family History Centre for people with Ukrainian ancestry on Saturday, 20 January 2007 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Additions to our Permanent Collections 
  • England, Northamptonshire. Adstone, baptisms 1682-1821, marriages 1697-1835, burials 1678-1821 (Fiche 6126561);  Crick, baptisms 1793-1812, burials 1793-1821 (Fiche 6127166); Kilsby, baptisms and burials 1785-1812 (Fiche 6127925); Kilsby, baptisms 1813-1865 (Fiche 6127926); Kilsby, marriages 1754-1812 (Fiche 6127928); Kilsby, burials 1813-1866 (Fiche 6127930); Stowe-Nine-Churches marriages 1755-1790 (Fiche 6128976).
  • England, further parishes now listed (detailed description in Bulletin 01/2007).
 
ENG DBY Allestree Marriages 1595-1812
ENG DBY Boulton Marriages 1756-1812
ENG DBY Breaston Marriages 1719-1810
ENG DBY Church Broughton Marriages 1538-1812
ENG DBY Dale Abbey Marriages 1667-1813
ENG DBY Hault Hucknall Marriages 1660-1812
ENG DBY Heath or Lownd Marriages1632-1812
ENG DBY Mackworthy Marriages 1603-1812
ENG DBY Ockbrook Marriages 1631-1812
ENG DBY Risley Marriages 1720-1812
ENG DBY Sandiacre Marriages 1581-1812
ENG DBY Stanley Marriages 1754-1812
ENG DBY Stanton-by-Dale 1605-1812
ENG DEV Countisbury Marriages 1676-1757
ENG DEV Ipplepen Marriages 1612-1813
ENG DEV Kings Kerswell Marriages 1752-1837
ENG DEV Martinhoe Marriages 1633-1812
ENG DEV Trentishoe Marriages 1697-1812
ENG DEV Uffculme Marriages 1538-1837
ENG DEV Werrington Marriages 1654-1812
ENG DOR Beaminster Marriages 1686-1812
ENG DOR Bothenhampton Marriages1636-1812
ENG DOR Bradpole Marriages 1695-1812
ENG DOR Cattistock Marriages 1558-1812
ENG DOR Chilfrome Marriages 1709-1812
ENG DOR Mapperton Marriages 1669-1812
ENG DOR Milton Abbey Marriages1559-1812
ENG DOR North Poorton Marriages 1761-1812
ENG DOR Powerstock & West Milton Marriages 1568-1812
ENG DOR Walditch Marriages 1738-1812
ENG ESS Ashdon Marriages 1557-1812
ENG ESS Boxted Marriages 1559-1837
ENG ESS Great Horkesley Marriages 1538-1836
ENG ESS Little Horkesley Marriages 1568-1835
ENG ESS Navestock Marriages 1538-1812
ENG ESS Wormingford Marriages 1559-1837
ENG GLS Forthampton Marriages 1697-1812
ENG GLS Kings Stanley Marriages 1573-1812
ENG GLS Kingswood Marriages 1598-1812
ENG GLS Michel Dean Marriages 1680-1812
ENG GLS Nimpsfield Marriages 1679-1812
ENG GLS Old Sodbury Marriages 1684-1812
ENG GLS Owlpen Marriages 1687-1895
ENG GLS Quedgeley Marriages 1559-1830
ENG GLS Rendcombe Marriages 1566-1812
ENG GLS Shipton Moyne Marriages 1587-1812
ENG GLS Slimbridge Marriages 1635-1812
ENG GLS Swindon Marriages 1638-1837
ENG GLS Winchcombe Marriages 1589-1812

 

 The Forum Answers to Previous QuestionsQ4/51/2006.  Gustav Richard Rudolph Haag, born London, England 1868, appears in 1881 Census as Augustine Haag in orphanage in Birmingham, England, married Margaret Jane Scott in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1893.  Thought to have come to Canada shortly after 1881 Census and at one time lived in Eardley, Quebec.  How do I find him in the 1891 Census and when exactly did he come to Canada? The short answer to the first part of the question is that unless you know where he was living in 1891 finding him in that Census is going to be very difficult as there is no comprehensive index.  If you wish to pursue this then looking at the area in and around Winnipeg and Eardley would be obvious starting point.  The answer to the second part of the question should be "easy, just look in the 1901 Census which gives the year they entered Canada"  However, there can be problems as indicated below.  Gwen Armstrong did some sleuthing and came up with the following (note the name differences and the clearly incorrect date of immigration) "You can find your family in the 1901 Census in Winnipeg (City), Ward 5, dist 12, sub dist E-15:  

Agustine Hague / b. 15 Feb 1868, England / came to Canada 1870 (clearly incorrect) Margaret / b. 4 Nov 1870, Ireland

and children Albert E., Florence, Gladis, Agustine

 In the 1906 Census:Margaret is a widow, and is listed as Mrs. Hauye with children, Albert, Florence, Gladys, Augustin, Sidney and Oliver. They are living in Portage La Prairie - Townships 11 IN Ranges 14, 15, 16 West, sub dist 3, page 5. There are a couple of Scott families on the same page, and as Margaret's maiden name was Scott, perhaps she went to live with her family after her husband's death. The 1906 Western Canada Census also gives the year of immigration, unfortunately Gustav/Augustin appears to be deceased and we cannot use it to verify when he came to Canada.  I know that on Alberta, Saskatchewan and BC death certificates they ask how long a person has been in Canada and also in the province. I haven't seen a Manitoba one, but it might also give those dates". However, we have carried out an extensive search of the Manitoba death records where Augustine should appear if he died in Manitoba but despite using every combination of his surname and searching just by the first name of Augustine in its various forms we have failed to find him.  Our thoughts therefore are that either Margaret was not a widow in 1906 or that her husband died outside the province.  We regret we must now hand this back to the questioner with still much work remaining to be done. Films received in the 7 days ending 11 January 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 8 February 2007.
 
 
Film Content Film No
ENG Bonner Family of Kent 1720-1790 1545093
ENG YRK Otley BTs 1774-1826 0918401
ENG YRK Otley BTs 1848-1897 1849387
IND Bengal transcripts v.9-10 0498610
UK Bonner Family 0994071
UK Royal Artillery Recs 1830-1860 'J' 0861870
USA MI Wayne Co Marr's 1836 - 1937 1377631
 
A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes. News from the trenches 
  • Wendy Frew gives us a very interesting story:
"RAF WW II

I have found quite a bit of information on my mother's cousin, Maurice William Barrington-Taylor whose Wellington Bomber  was shot down on Dec. 18th 1939.1.  I initially used the Commonwealth War Graves web site (www.cwgc.org) where I obtained his date of death, squadron number and service number
2. I then went to the 37 Squadron's web site for information on their history. (Most squadrons have a web site)3.  I wrote for his RAF Service Record.  It cost 30 GBP  The address is:
Royal Air Force, Personnel Management Agency, Royal Air Force, Innsworth, Gloucester,  GL3  1EZYou must fill in The Declaration By Next of Kin before you can obtain the record.
4.  The best piece of information came from the 
Air Historical Branch, Ministry of Defence, Building 266, Royal Air Force Bentley Priory, Stanmore Middlesex,  HA7 3HH

 I wrote them with the name,  date of death and squadron number. They sent me details of the mission, where the plane was shot down, the names of the crew, the fact that one crew member survived and died in a prison camp and even the name of the German pilot who shot them down.  I was amazed at the detail.


RN  WW  I
I have also been searching for information on my mother's uncle, John Yeadon, of HMS Vindictive, who was killed at the Battle of Zeebrugge on April 23 1918.
1.  Once again I started with the Commonwealth War Graves from where I obtained his date of death and service number.
2.  I then went to the National Archives     (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline/  where they have the Service Records of all R.N. enlisted men from 1873-1923 and downloaded his record.3.  As I wanted to learn more about the ships on which he served I wrote to
Royal Naval Museum,HM Naval Base (PP66), Portsmouth, Hampshire, PO1  3NH They sent me information sheets on each ship.
4. Naval Records are also held by:
Fleet Air Arm Museum  Box Number D6  RNAS Yeovilton Somerset BA22  8HT. I obtained some information from them.  They are a charity and do appreciate a small donation.
5.  The most amazing source of all was The Great War Forum.  You can find it by Googling The Great War Forum or using the web address:
http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums)

This is a free forum for those who have an interest in  WW I.  I found a discussion group on Zeebrugge and posted a question. I was amazed at the information I received from members of the Forum.  They were incredibly generous with their expertise and personal research.


My mother had always believed her uncle's body was never recovered.  A book I read on Zeebrugge also listed him as missing.  However, one of the Forum participants sent me a picture of his grave in Dover Cemetery.  He is buried in a double grave with a Royal Marine .  Apparently this is done when they have two unidentifiable bodies. 


One of the participants in the Forum is writing a book on Zeebrugge and shared information he found in the  National Archives.  This included:

- a testimony from one of John Yeadon’s shipmates ‘I saw Yeadon just before we landed from the Vindictive, but I never saw him on the Mole and can give no information as to his….. fate.’ 

-a letter from the Accountant General to John Yeadon’s mother on August 15th  1918 .'I have to inform you that among the unidentified bodies landed at Dover following the operations against Zeebrugge, was one, the clothing of which was marked E. Basten.  As the result, however, of an examination and documents found on this body, there would appear to be now little doubt that it is your son.  Further a report has been received from another member of the crew of HMS Renown who took part in the action, to the effect that he is almost certain that he saw your son lying on the midship ramp of HMS Vindictive with a shrapnel wound through his head. In these circumstances, the Admiralty is regretfully constrained to presume that your son was killed in action on the 23rd April last. I have to add that the deceased , together with other Officers and men who lost their lives in the expedition was accorded a public funeral with full Naval honours in the St. Jame’s Cemetery, Dover, on the 27th April.’

I exchanged several e-mails with the man who is researching the Zeebrugge raid for a book and as a result he is including a section on the many mothers whose letters seeking word on the fate of their sons he found in the National Archives.  He is including a picture I sent him. and will be using the epitaph on my great uncle’s grave  'HE SLEEPS WITH BRITISH HEROES IN THE WATCHFUL CARE OF GOD,' to open his chapter on men from the Zeebrugge raid who are buried at Dover, St, James's Cemetery. 

So, there it is.  Hope you find the information of interest and of some use." Thank you Wendy.
Were you aware.............. James Thomson writes on two topics, as follows: "(A) BT 27: Board of Trade Passenger Lists, Outwards, 1890-1960I contributed a piece to Bulletin 43/2006, of last October 26, about the indexing and digital imaging of the record series held at The National Archives (TNA) at Kew as BT 27: Board of Trade Passenger Lists, Outwards, 1890-1960. This series consists of passenger lists for ships leaving the UK (and, for 1890-1922, ports now in the Republic of Ireland) for final destinations outside Europe (or the Mediterranean). The project is being undertaken by FindMyPast.com (formerly 1836Online.com), and the results are to be accessible through www.ancestorsonboard.com. It is anticipated that the project will be completed, and the entire seventy year range available, by early 2008 (and perhaps substantially earlier). 

The results for the first decade, 1890-1899, are available now. Searches in the index may be made by name, year (or year range), departure port, and/or destination country or port; in future, it will also be possible to search by ship name. Index searches are free, but if an entry of interest is found, units have to be purchased to view a transcript of the passenger list entry or digital image of the passenger list page in which the entry was recorded. The information given in a transcript or image for the currently-available decade will normally include age, occupation and marital status (as well as information about the ship); the image shows everyone on the same page of the passenger list, and hence may include details of family members. Currently, transcripts are 5 units each and digital images are 30 units each; the site provides information about how to purchase units (each unit costs between 5p and 8p, depending on the number purchased).In addition to passengers embarking for ports in North America, the BT 27 Passenger Lists include those embarking for ports around the world, not least those in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and India. Indeed, the lists may be of even broader interest than one might assume, in that they include not only emigrants, but also those travelling for any other reason, as well as many non-UK residents whose voyage overseas departed from the British Isles.

(B) RG 14: 1911 Census of England and WalesIt had been anticipated that TNA would release the 1911 Census on January 3, 2012, having kept it confidential for 100 years in line with previous practice. However, a successful appeal to the Information Commissioner by a complainant who had been denied information from the 1911 census has had two consequences:

(i)    A project to index and digitise the 1911 Census is being accelerated, and TNA hopes that it will be possible to launch an online search facility early in 2009 (rather than at the beginning of 2012) - only sensitive information (such as an infirmity) will be withheld until 2012.

(ii)   It is anticipated that, starting next Wednesday (January 17, 2007), TNA will respond to requests for lookups in the 1911 Census, but only for an address specified by the enquirer, and only upon payment of a fee of 45 Pounds per search (non-refundable whether the household sought was at that address at the time of the census (April 2, 1911) or not).

 
For details, see the TNA webpages http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/1911census/?homepage=news and http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help/1911census/ (when on the latter page, also click on the links on the left side of the page for more information). Among the interesting aspects of the 1911 Census are that the information is recorded on returns which were completed by the households being enumerated (rather than on enumerators' schedules); that they contain columns for the number of years married and the number of children born to the present marriage; and that they are available for some army units overseas (and some ships at sea). The information in the 1911 Census will be particularly valuable since it serves as a finding aid for marriages and births between 1901 and 1911; from 1912, spouse names are included in marriage indexes and mothers' maiden names are included in birth indexes".  
 

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. 

Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

Email:  Toronto_FHC@bellnet.ca

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Our thanks go to those readers who sent us Christmas and New Year greetings and expressed their appreciation of the Bulletin.
 
In this Bulletin
  • The marriage records of over 200 English parishes added.  See Additions to our Permanent Collections.
  • We draw your attention to the valuable information that can be obtained from Marriage Licences, Allegations and Bonds in Were you aware.................
Announcements
  • The Ontario Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists are presenting "A Double-Header Event for Serious Genealogists"  - John Green: Whose Father was He? and Genealogy Software Programs: Are they for the professional? to be held on Saturday 17 February at the North York Central Library from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Admission is $30 for non-OCAPG members.  Further details are on the Notice Board at the Family History Centre.
  • A reminder of the open-house at the Family History Centre for people with Ukrainian ancestry on Saturday, 20 January from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Additions to our Permanent Collections
  • Burma. Another film to augment our Indian sub-continent collection.  Film No. 0527436, Burma Ecclesiastical Returns, Index of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1937 to 1953.
  • USA Pennsylvania.  Allegheny County.  Various cemetery records.  Fiche No. 6017811
  • England, Devon.  Biographical Indexes, Devonshire leaders, 1894 and 1907.  Fiche No. 6085449 and 6028146.
  • England/New Zealand.  Hole and Harris descendants, 1730-1890.  Fiche No. 6036267.
  • England.  A collection of 28 CDs containing Phillimore's Parish - mainly marriage - records of over 200 parishes.  Although many of the entries appear on the IGI, these records show far greater detail e.g. marital status and in some cases name the person giving away the bride, usually of course her father.  In addition, if the marriage was by licence this too is shown pointing the way to further research as described in the article below in Were you aware.......  Listing in excess of 200 parishes would take up too much room in this Bulletin so we plan to spread the listing over several weeks.  The 28 CDs contain parishes in the following counties:   Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Cornwall, Derbyshire, Devon, Dorset, Essex, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Leicestershire, London, Middlesex, Norfolk, Nottinghamshire, Shropshire, Suffolk, Somerset, Surrey, Wiltshire, Yorkshire.  The parish listing for the first four counties is shown below:

Parish

ENG BKM Cheddington Marriages 1552-1812

ENG BKM Cholesbury Marriages 1576-1812

ENG BKM Edlesborough Marriages 1562-1812

ENG BKM Hawridge Marriages 1600-1812

ENG BKM Masworth Marriages 1591-1812

ENG BKM Mentmore Marriages 1575-1812

ENG BKM Pitstone Marriages 1576-1812

ENG BKM Slapton Marriages 1653-1812

ENG BKM Soulbury Marriages 1575-1812

ENG CAM Cambridge St. Edward’s Marriages 1558-1812

ENG CAM Fen Drayton Marriages 1580-1812

ENG CAM Knapwell Marriages 1598-1812

ENG CHS Christleton Marriages 1697-1812

ENG CHS Disley Marriages 1591-1738

ENG CHS Gawsworth Marriages 1557-1812

ENG CHS Lymm Marriages 1568-1812

ENG CHS Marple Marriages 1656-1754

ENG CHS Taxal Marriages 1611-1812

ENG CON Davidstow Marriages 1676-1811

ENG CON Dovent Marriages 1676-1801

ENG CON Forrabury Marriages 1676-1812

ENG CON Lanteglos by Camelford Marriages 1558-1812

ENG CON Lesnewth Marriages 1569-1812

ENG CON Michaelstow Marriages 1548-1812

ENG CON Minster Marriages 1676-1812

ENG CON Otterham Marriages 1687-1811

ENG CON St. Breward Marriages 1558-1812

ENG CON St. Clether Marriages 1640-1811

ENG CON St. Hilary Marriages 1692-1812

ENG CON St. Juliot Marriages 1656-1812

ENG CON St. Teath Marriages 1558-1812

ENG CON St. Uly-Lelant Marriages 1679-1812

ENG CON Trevalga Marriages 1539-1812

ENG CON Zennor Marriages 1617-1812

 

The Forum

 

Answers to Previous Questions

Q1/51/2006.  Joseph McBrady buried in St. John's Norway Cemetery died April 19, 1906 but cannot find the death registration.

Gwen Armstrong found it, listed under Joseph Brady. 

Joseph Brady died: 5 Apr 1906, Toronto, Yorkage 57living at cor[ner] King & NiagaraHotel Porterregistered: 7 Apr 1906.(We think that April 19 date may be the burial date).

Q4/51/2006. 
Gustav Richard Rudolph Haag.  Considerable progress has been made with this query and we hope to publish results in next week's Bulletin. Films received in the 7 days ending 4 January 2007, due for return (unless renewed) 8 February 2007.
 
 
Film Content Film No
CAN ON Morrisburg Cath PR 1856-1920 2046904
CAN ON Norfolk mar 1923 0266928
CAN PQ Aylmer PR 1841-1852 1031890
DEU WUE Kirchensall CR 1607-1840 1340215
ENG BKM Hawridge BT 1600-1820 1999322
ENG KEN Herne Wkhse Recs 1883-92 1655814
ENG YKS Ossett PR 1792-1914 1542281
ENG YKS Sowerby BTs 1664-1837 0990617
ENG YKS Sowerby Ch.Rec 1707-1896 1736656
MMR Burma BMD Index 1937-1953 0527436
NLD Almelo Reformed PR 1691-1795 0116411
POL Lwow St Marii Magdaleny pr 2034927
PSE Bethlehem St Catherine RC B 1356993
USA NY Albany St Peters PR 1756- 0533492
 
A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.
 Were you aware................... 

England & Wales.  Marriage Licences, Allegations and Bonds.  The Marriage Act of 1753, often referred to as Lord Hardwicke’s Marriage Act, sought to put a stop to clandestine marriages which had become rife and which hitherto had been performed without banns having been called, often officiated by defrocked ministers.  The Act, which did not apply to Scotland, the Channel Islands or to Quakers or Jews (but did apply to Catholics and Non-Conformists) required that all marriages must be solemnized in church after banns had been called or, failing banns, for which a licence had been issued.  The marriage had to be recorded in the Parish Register. The bride had to be over the age of 12 and the groom over the age of 14; the consent of the father was required for either party under the age of 21. The Act came into effect on 25 March 1754 and from there on any marriage that did not meet these requirements would be null and void and any children born to such a marriage would be considered illegitimate and have no rights of succession.   As a result of this Act most marriages were performed in churches after the publication of Banns but about 2% of all marriages were solemnized after the issuance of a licence and it is these marriages that are of most interest to genealogists.  Since there was a cost involved, why would anyone want to get married by licence?  Almost invariably the reason would have been to avoid publicizing the fact that the marriage was about to take place.  Thus a father might insist that the man who had impregnated his daughter marry her, he could be less keen to have his friends and neighbours know that she was marrying beneath her social class.  If the birth of a child was imminent the avoidance of the calling of Banns (which had to be called on three successive Sundays), by obtaining a licence, the couple who had jumped the gun, so to speak, could be rushed to the altar before anyone had the chance to change their mind or to disappear. To obtain a licence to marry, an application had to be made (usually made by the groom) to the Archdeacon of the diocese in which both parties resided.  If they did not live in the same diocese the application had to be made to the Archbishop of Canterbury.  The applicant had to allege (the allegation ) that the parties were free to marry i.e. they were not already married or that by reason of relationship were barred from marrying, and up until 1823, had to put up a bond which would be forfeited if the allegation proved to be untrue.  The bond was substantial - £200 was commonplace – to deter frivolous applications.  If either party to the marriage was a minor, i.e. under 21, the consent of the father, or in the event of his decease, the consent of the mother or guardian was required.  The applicant had to name at least one church, but often named more than one, in which the marriage could take place.  Since many licence applications involved minors and thus showed father’s names and other details they can be valuable in establishing parentage. Most of these licence applications have been filmed and are available through the Family History Centre.  Canterbury allegations are contained in 217 films; London in 279 films to give but two examples but films are available for many other jurisdictions.  And if I had an ancestor who was married by licence I’d sure want to see his application.  (If you have difficulty in deciding in which archdeaconry the application would have been made, let us know and we will try to sort it out). 

 

Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. 

Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

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This is the final Bulletin for 2006.  We have enjoyed producing it each week and have been encouraged by so many of you who have taken the trouble to write in to tell us how much they liked receiving it.  May we wish you all a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
 
Apparently the Toronto Family History Centre was featured in last night's episode of Ancestors in the Attic.  Although I didn't see the show I am told that it was the best episode to date.
 
In this Bulletin
  • We summarize the (hopefully) informative articles that have appeared during the course of the year.  Looking through the list makes us very much aware of how Anglo-Centric we are but, in our defence we would say that we reflect the questions we get asked and are quite willing to publish any informative piece on other countries that readers would like to submit.
  • Several puzzles that everybody can work on during the holidays in The Forum
Announcements
  • Special announcement - please note.  Due to staffing difficulties we will not be open for the 6.30 to 9.30 p.m. evening session on Wednesday, 3 January 2007.
  • Christmas holiday.  We will be open tomorrow, Friday 22 December but closed then until we reopen on Tuesday 2 January, 2007.
  • Open House - Ukrainian Genealogy.  We are pleased to be hosting an open house for people with Ukrainian ancestry sponsored by the Toronto Ukrainian Genealogy Group on Saturday afternoon, 20 January 2007, 2 to 4 p.m.  Everyone with a Ukrainian background is welcome.
Additions to our Permanent Collections
  • We now have all 125 CDs of the Pedigree Resource File.  These contain lineage-linked pedigrees that have been submitted to the Family and Church History Department of the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.  These pedigrees contain unedited notes and sources.
The Forum
 
New Questions
Q1/51/2006.  Canada, Ontario.  My great grandfather Joseph McBrady is buried in St John's Norway Cemetery, Kingston Road, Toronto.  From information I have obtained from the cemetery I am told that he was a Porter and died from a heart attack on April 19, 1906 at the age of 57.  The funeral home was McCabe's of 222 Queen Street who by 1936 were located at 192 Westminster Avenue but disappear after that.  My questions are 1)  Why can't I find a death registration for him in Ontario Vital Records, and 2) what happens to a funeral company's records when they close down?
 
Q2/51/2006.  England/Belgium.  An ancestor, Margaret Burke who was born in Manchester on 28 June 1878.  In the 1891 Census she is shown as age 12 in St Ann's Industrial School, Formby, Lancashire.  I believe that shortly after that she was sent to Belgium, probably as a domestic.  About 1912 she visited England and by all accounts appeared to be prosperous.  How can I find out what happened to her after that?
 
Q3/51/2006.  U.S.A./Scotland.  Several members my extended Swankie family emigrated to the U.S.A. from Scotland in the 1920's and '30's.  I have been able to find them on the Ellis Island records and the immigration records on Ancestry.com.  Some of these relatives returned to Scotland either permanently or for extended stays.  How can I find details of those return trips?
 
Q4/51/2006.  England/Canada.  Gustav Richard Rudolph Haag was born in London, England in 1868.  In the 1881 Census he appears as Augustine Haag in St Phillip's Orphanage, Birmingham and shortly after that was sent to Canada destined for the Ottawa area.  Sometime in the 1880's or early 90's his brother in England filled out a form giving his address as McGee's Farm, Eardley, Quebec but there is no sign of him there in the 1891 Census.  In 1893 Augustin Richard Hague married Margaret Jane Scott in Winnipeg.  My questions are 1)  How do I find him in the 1891 Census and 2) When exactly did he come to Canada?
 
 
Films received in the 7 days ending 21 December 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 1 February 2007.
 
Film Content Film No
CRO Sv Ivanac na Rasom Dths 1848-12 2099954
DEU Immigrant Repat 1939-1945 'R' 2098097
DEU PRE Tilsit PR index 1908-1944 1186479
ENG CHS Chester St John PR 1559- 2045920
ENG CHS Chester St John PR 1754 2045950
ENG ESS Wethersfield Marr 1837-1985 1526987
ENG GLS Tetbury PR 1631-1837 0856949
ENG Ind to death duty reg 1884 S to Z 1937736
ENG KEN Eastling PR 1558-1953 1836242
ENG LEI Leicester marr 1853-1874 0870051
ENG LND Rec Copy Will 1897 'B' 1867418
ENG Mil Rec R.Artillery WO97 'J' 0916493
ENG SFS Upper Arley PR 1564-1812 0415136
ITL Udine Pasiano CivReg 1871-1910 2163263
ITL Udine Pasiano CivReg 1871-1911 2163262
NDL Strijen Census 1830-1846 1050679
NDL Strijen Marriage Lic. 1909 1748841
POL LU Urzedow RC PR 1690-1825 0996790
 
A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.
 
2006 Bulletins - Summary of Informative Articles
 
We thought it would be useful, particularly for those people who have joined the mailing list during the course of the year, to list articles that we have published.  If anybody wants a copy of a particular article just let us know.
 
02/2006.  British Isles.  Quaker family history research.
04/2006.  England & Wales.  Using the Death Duty Indexes.
05/2006.  United Kingdom.  World War 1 Military Records - the "Burnt" and "Unburnt" documents.
06/2006.  United Kingdom.  The Deceased Wife's Sisters and the Deceased Brother's Widows Acts.
07/2006.  United Kingdom.  Divorce history.
08/2006.  England & Wales.  Obtaining copies of wills.
08/2006.  U.S.A Immigration.  Castle Gardens immigration records 1830-1892.
09/2006.  The Commonwealth.  War deaths.
10/2006.  United Kingdom.  Women's Army Auxiliary Corps records.
12/2006.  England & Wales.  Voting qualifications.
15/2006.  Ireland.  Probate and Inland Revenue films.
17/2006.  United Kingdom.  Seaman's Records.
18/2006.  England & Wales.  Hints on using the 1841 Census.
19/2006.  Netherlands.  Guides for genealogical sources.
19/2006.  Genealogy generally.  Use of digital cameras.
20/2006.  Canada.  1851 Census.
21/2006.  United Kingdom.   Improvements in the National Archives site.
22/2006.  England.  Merchant Seamen, Naturalization and Divorce Records.
23/2006.  Scotland.  Probate Records.
24/2006.  Scotland.  City Directories.
25/2006.  Ireland.  Land Transfer Records.
28/2006.  U.S.A, Canada, British Isles.  Criminal records.
28/2006.  England.  Lancashire wills.
29/2006.  England.  Boyd's Marriage Index.
30/2006.  Australia.  Overseas passengers arriving Victoria 1852-1923
30/2006.  Poland.  Genealogy sources.
32/2006.  England & Wales.  Identifying merchant seamen in censuses.
32/2006.  England & Wales.  National Burial Index.
32/2006.  Canada.  Passenger arrivals.
33/2006.  Scotland.  Free Church records.
34/2006.  England & Wales.  Coroner's Inquests.
34/2006.  British Isles.  British Biographical Archive and British and Irish Biographies.
37/2006.  Ireland.  Obtaining Irish wills.
41/2006.  United Kingdom.  Soldier's Documents 1760-1854.
42/2006.  British India.  Baptismal, Marriage and Burial indexes.
42/2006.  Great Britain.  Royal Navy Seaman's Records
43/2006.  Italy.  Availability of records.
43/2006.  Canada.  1851/2 Census.
44/2006.  Genealogy.  Pros and cons of various software programmes.
44/2006.  Canada.  Sources for Ontario genealogical data.
45/2006.  Canada.  Sources for Manitoba, Saskatchewan and British Columbia genealogical data.
46/2006.  U.S.A.  Passengers arriving at U.S. ports.
46/2006.  Germany, Poland, Baltic countries.  The "repatriated" Germans.
47/2006.  Scotland.  How to obtain birth, marriage and death data.
48/2006.  England & Wales.  Researching manorial documents.
49/2006.  Poland, Eastern Europe.  The Geographic Dictionary of the former Kingdom of Poland.
49/2006.  British Isles.  The British Vital Records Index.
50/2006.  South Africa.  South African (Boer) War records.
50/2006.  Canada.  City Directories.
 
 
Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours (but also see Annoucements above) 
 
Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m. 
Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.
Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon.
 
Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line.
 
Toronto Family History Centre
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

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TUGG HOMEPAGE


Readers of this Bulletin will note that there is no The Forum section.  Several readers have been good enough to email their appreciation of this section and we would like to continue it.  Problem is that nobody has sent in any questions.  So, please, send us your questions.
 
In this Bulletin
  • We talk about Boer War records and Directories in the Were you aware............ section
Announcements
  • Christmas Closing.  Our last day will be Friday 22 December and we will reopen on Tuesday, 2 January 2007.  (Films ordered by patrons that are affected by the Christmas closing are being extended by an appropriate time period).
Films received in the 7 days ending 14 December 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 25 January 2007.
 
Film Content Film No
CAN PQ Stanstead Baptist PRs 1838 1430772
CAN The Warren Family 0924903
DEU PRE Wischwill PR Bapt 1781-1872 0490427
DEU WUE Kirchensall CR 1840-1890 1340216
ENG BKM Hawridge PR 1785-1848 0919231
ENG DEV South Tawton PR 1540-1738 0917531
ENG SOM Batheaston PR 1634-1885 1526372
ENG SOM Batheaston PR 1850-1935 1849633
ENG WOR Newbold on Stour PR 1838- 0557295
GER BAD Emigration Index 1866 A-Dr 1180096
GER Handbook of Nobility 1900 0492046
IND Bengal BMD Oct-Dec 1904 0527526
IND Bengal BMD Vol 87-88 1855 0498993
IND Bengal bur v.433 1918 0527555
IND Bengal transcripts v.9-10 0498610
IRL ARM Various Parishes Misc Recs 1279329
IRL ARM Various Parishes Misc Recs 1279356
IRL ARM Various Parishes Misc Recs 1279357
ITL Calabria Agnana - Stilo Births 1888 1800866
POL Kalisz RC PR 1898134
POL Przasnysz RC PR 0702883
SCT ARL Lochgoilhead PR 1692-1855 1041073
SCT INV Kilmorack PR 1674-1854 0990709
UKR Kuty RC PRs 1780 - 1945 2328875
UKR L'viv Greek Catholic Priest Recs 1764234
 

A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

 
Were you aware………………..
 
South Africa/England/Canada/Australia/New Zealand.  The South African (Boer) Wars.  The first Boer War started on December 16, 1880 when the Boers declared the independence from Britain of the Transvaal.  Although there were British garrisons in the Transvaal the 1,800 men were far out-numbered by 7,000 Boer soldiers who were familiar with the terrain and expert marksmen who had no difficulty in picking off the red uniformed British soldiers.  Realising the hopelessness of their position Prime Minister William Gladstone signed a truce on March 6, 1881 and a peace treaty on March 23, 1881 giving the Boers self government of the Transvaal. About 700 British soldiers died in this 3 month war.
 
The second Boer war started on 11 October 1899 and did not finish until 31 May 1902.  In this war the British were supported by volunteer troops from Canada, Australia and New Zealand.  Figures for the numbers of troops involved on the British side vary from 250,000 to 500,000 but by the end of this war 22,000 had died, 7,792 in battle and the remainder from disease.
The 1901 Census of the United Kingdom and for Canada took place during the course of this war with the result that a large number of men, normally resident in these countries, were not counted.  So far as the U.K. is concerned filling the gaps is no easy task as there are no easily accessible, comprehensive database of the men who served in the second Boer War.  There are a few regimental databases and one very good one http://hometown.aol.co.uk/kevinasplin/home.html .  This database gives the name, rank, service number and regiment of the men of the Imperial Yeomanry, the Lovat’s Scouts and the Scottish Horse – a total of 39,800 men.  The National Archives have the attestation and discharge papers of the men (not the officers) of the Imperial Yeomanry in WO128.  A more comprehensive list of the men who served in the second Boer war is probably contained in the records of the recipients of the Queen’s South Africa Medal listed in WO 100/120-130, WO 100/356-357 as this medal was awarded to nearly 200,000 men.  Again, although the records exist they can only be accessed by visiting the National Archives at Kew.  Perhaps we should offer to index them.
If you know the regiment that your ancestor served in you could try contacting the regimental organisation (if one exists) who might be able to give you details of any medals awarded but usually nothing else.  A record of the military deaths that occurred is contained in a set of microfiche we have in the FHC entitled GRO Natal & S.African Forces Deaths 1899-1902.  These are highly unsatisfactory insofar that they give only the surname and the initial letter of the first forename and the regiment in which they served - no mention of the date or place of death or the service number.
However, the military records of the Canadians who served in the second Boer War are available on www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/south-african-war   A roll of the Australians who served is on http://members.pcug.org.au/~croe/ozb/oz_boer.cgi 
If any reader knows of better sources for these records perhaps they would let me know.
 
Canada - Directories.  Paul Branson writes:
"If you are a rookie researcher ( like me ), who needs an easy place to start piecing together family locations and movements, I have found old directories to be of great value.  These were issued yearly, and do not give phone numbers, ( there weren't many),  but list families alphabetically by surname with their address, and in another section each street is listed alphabetically with the name of who lives at each number on the street.  These were produced and sold, I presume as marketing tools to companies for advertising purposes.  I have found useful information in Mights Toronto City Directory (a copy cost $12.50 in 1917) and Vernon's Town of Brockville Directory ( one costed $2.50 in 1913 ).  There is a great selection of Mights directories at the North York Central Library (6th Floor) all on microfilm, and at the Ontario Archives.  In smaller towns they are rarer and likely only exist as hard copies in the reference section of the local library where you will have to ask nicely, and conduct your research under the watchful gaze of the person in charge, as they were often printed on newsprint and are very frail.  These are also interesting historical documents in their own right, as they contain advertisements for companies, and Industries that no longer exist, and there is always a section in front that extolls the industrial development, points of interest, schools and service clubs in the area.    There are pitfalls to watch for when locating people in these books.  They often only list the head of the family, and adult boarders at the address.  You also have to be aware, especially in Toronto that the city boundaries were a lot smaller than they are now, and a family that lived "just outside the city limits" may not get listed. The next time you are tossing out an old phone book, pause for a moment and consider how valuable it may be in 100 years ! "
 
 
Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours:- 
 
Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m. 
Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.
Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon.
 
Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line.
 
Toronto Family History Centre
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

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TUGG HOMEPAGE


We are still requiring questions for The Forum, submissions to the Were you aware........section and we still need an experienced Microsoft Access programmer to help us with our database management.
 
In this Bulletin
  • Of enormous value to our Eastern Europe researchers are the new arrivals in the Additions to our Permanent Collections section.
  • A description of the British Vital Records Index, a peek into Dr Williams' Library and news of on-line Scottish censuses in the Were you aware..........section
Announcements
 
  • Christmas Closing.  Our last day will be Friday 22 December and we will reopen on Tuesday, 2 January, 2007.  (For the benefit of new subscribers to the Bulletin this announcement will continue to appear each week).
  • A Musical Celebration of Christmas will be held in the Church on Sunday, 10 December commencing at 7.00 p.m. when the Toronto Stake Choir will be singing traditional and not so well known Christmas carols, the congregation being invited to join in the singing of some of them.
  •  
    Additions to our Permanent Collections
     
    Poland/Eastern Europe.  We are pleased to announce the arrival of 16 films - the Geographic Dictionary of the Former Kingdom of Poland and other Slavic Lands. This gazetteer was published between 1880 to 1902 under the direction of Filip Sulimierski. It is an excellent gazetteer for locating places in the areas of Poland, both present and past. Coverage includes all localities in the former Polish provinces of Russia, most localities in the former Austrian province of Galicia (now divided between Poland and the Ukraine), Belorussian provinces of the Russian Empire (now in the Republic of Belarus) and also contains significant localities in other Slavic and eastern European nations; Russia, Slovakia, the Czech Republic,Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Bulgaria and Romania. While the information is a bit less comprehensive, localities from the provinces of Poznan, West Prussia, East Prussia, Silesia, and Pomerania are also covered. It is an extremely valuable gazetteer in that it indicates the parish for most of the villages. The parish is the most productive place to search for vital records.

    Localities are listed alphabetically. Slownik Geograficzny follows the normal Polish alphabetical order except that the o and o are alphabetized as one letter. Also other pairs (c,c), (n,n), (s,s), and the group (z, z, z) are in some cases not alphabetized separately.

    If there are several localities with the same name they are numbered. Places in the Kingdom of Poland are listed first, followed by places in Galicia, Ukraine, Byelorussia (Belarus), Prussia and other states. If the locality had a foreign name or alternate spelling it is indicated in italics after the entry. Some entries will refer you to another entry with the abbreviation ob. meaning "see".
    (My thanks to Sonia van Heerden for putting the above description together).
     
    The Forum
     
    Answers to Previous Questions
    Q1/48/2006.  Genealogy.  Where can I find (preferably on the Web) a Latin dictionary for old occupations and for causes of death?
     
    Steve Kressler writes: "At the LDS website, if you search under Research Guidance you will find a Latin genealogical word list which has, under general words, a fairly extensive selection of occupations listed.  There are also a certain number of diseases indicated.  A decent site for archaic medical terms in general (many of which may have been derived from Latin) is: http://www.paul_smith.doctors.org.uk/ArchaicMedicalTerms.htm

    Also, you could check “Diseases & Medical Terms” on Cyndi’s List for several other on-line listings".

    Films received in the 7 days ending 7 December 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 18 January 2007

    Film Content Film No
    CRO Sv Ivanac na Rasom Bths 1848-90 2099953
    DEU Immigrant Repat 1939-1945 'W-V' 2098522
    DEU PRE Schwelm PR 1676-1814 0575076
    DEU PRE Tilsit PR 1819-1838 1813522
    ENG DEV Belstone PR 1552-1837 0916809
    ENG ESS Epping PR 1539-1896 1472222
    ENG GLS Tetbury BTs 1578-1812 0427788
    ENG KEN Newington PR 1473716
    ENG KEN Throwley PR 1557-1837 1850187
    ENG WOR Kidderminster PR 1802-20 0435265
    ENG WOR Kings Areley PR 1539-1941 0994247
    NDL Strijen Births 1843-1850 0237698
    NDL Strijen Births 1871-1882 0237703
    USA MI Detroit Church Recs 1825-1899 0959144
    USA NJ Births Atlantic-Hudson V.BY 1870 0494166
    USA NJ Births Camden-Hudson V.C1 1875 0494177
    USA NJ Deaths Atlantic-Warren 1871 0584591
    USA NJ Jersey City 1855 Census Dist.4 0888621
     

    A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
    Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

     
    Were you aware..................
     
    British Isles, Vital Records.   The Second Edition of the British Isles Vital Records Index was produced by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and released in 2003 but it remains a little known and very much under used resource.  The data is not available on-line.  The BVRI, as the index is known, is on 16 CD’s and can be purchased, as a set, for US$20.00 but is available for use, free of charge, at the Toronto Family History Centre.  The index contains the birth/christening and marriage records for 12.3 million people who lived in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and the Isle of Man between 1538 and 1906.
     
    Breakdown by country ('000's of records)
     
                                     Births/Christenings        Marriages
    England (incl. IOM)             6,702                        1,710
    Ireland                               1,133                             99
    Scotland                            2,453                             41
    Wales                                    18                               4
     
    Coverage of individual counties and parishes vary enormously.  For example, for Lancashire there are 825,657 birth/christening entries and 287,538 marriages but for London including Middlesex there are only 181,123 births/christenings and 17,793 marriages.  On the other hand, Wiltshire, with its relatively small population, has 526,143 births/christenings and 122,800 marriages. A parish by parish description of the coverage is on www.genoot.com/downloads/BVRI2
     
    Many of the entries are far more detailed than you generally find in indexed material.  The marriage of my grandfather is recorded thus:-
     
    GODDARD, Reginald, Age: 22
    Wife: Mary Ellen ALLSEP, Age: 29
    Marriage Date: 10 Jun 1894.  Recorded in:  Westminster, London, England.
    Collection:  Soho, St Anne
    Husband's Father:  Charles GODDARD
    Wife's Father:  John ALLSEP
    Source:  FHL Film 1468921.  Dates:  1879-1906.
     
    The only additional information that I could reasonably expect from the certificate (a copy of which would be on the film) would be the occupations of the two fathers and the marital status of the bride and groom.
     
    Also, tucked away inside the BVRI are the birth records of Dr Williams’ Library.  Dr Daniel Williams (1643-1716) a Presbyterian Minister bequeathed in his will a sum sufficient to set up a library as a repository for Non-Conformist Records.  The library opened in London in 1729 and continues to this day.  In 1743 a group of dissenting ministers, Baptist, Congregational and Presbyterian started to collect the birth records of children of dissenters.  Some of the records went back as 1716 and by the time Civil Registration started in England in July 1837 the birth records of 49,000 children had been collected.  The collection of these births ceased at that time and the records were passed over to the General Register Office.  The records were filmed by the LDS and are now included in the BVRI but are all listed under London, that being where the records were kept.  So if you know that your ancestors were Non-Conformist and have had difficulty in finding their birth details, the BVRI is certainly worth consulting.
     
    Come and take a look!
     
    Scotland.  Indexed versions of the 1851 and 1861 Scottish censuses are now available on-line at Ancestry.com, available free of charge at the Toronto Family History Centre.  While it is possible to call up complete families from the index patrons should note that at the moment scanned copies of the actual enumeration pages are not available.
     
     
    Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours:- 
     
    Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m. 
    Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
    Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.
    Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
    Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
    Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon.
     
    Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line.
     
    Toronto Family History Centre
    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
    24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
    Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

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    Our grateful thanks to the three readers of the Bulletin who came forward to donate computers following the request in last week's Bulletin.  We will be assembling them and giving instruction to the patrons of the FHC who do not have computers before passing them on.
     
    We are still seeking new questions for The Forum and you are invited to send us contributions to Were you aware......section of the Bulletin on items of interest to you, similar to Joan Read's article appearing this week.
     
    Do you have experience in Microsoft Access programming?  We need to be able to produce some additional reports drawn from our film/fiche order database.  Contact your editor at pgoddard@interlog.com if you can help.
     
     
    In this Bulletin
    • If your ancestor was an ag. lab in England  - (is there someone who doesn't have an ag lab ancestor?) - then there is a good chance that Manorial Records will be useful to you.  See Joan Read's piece in Were you aware............
    Announcements
     
  • Christmas Closing.  Our last day will be Friday 22 December and we will reopen on Tuesday, 2 January, 2007.  (For the benefit of new subscribers to the Bulletin this announcement will continue to appear each week).
  • A Musical Celebration of Christmas will be held in the Church on Sunday, 10 December commencing at 7.00 p.m. when the Toronto Stake Choir will be singing traditional and not so well known Christmas carols, the congregation being invited to join in the singing of some of them.
  •  
    Additions to our Permanent Collections
    • Netherlands.  Once again we have Christina Scott to thank for donating a DVD (yes a DVD) containing the Parish Records of no less than 60 parishes.  This is the fourth disk so we now have a substantial collection of these parish records.
    The Forum
     
    New Question
    Q1/48/2006.  Genealogy.  Where can I find (preferably on the Web) a Latin dictionary for old occupations and for causes of death?
     
     
    Films received in the 7 days ending 30 November 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 11 January 2007.
     
    Film Content Film No
    CAN NS Halifax Marriages 1866-1871 1318115
    CAN ON Brant County Marriages 1923 2266888
    CAN ON York County Marriages 1923 2266943
    CRO Zminj RC Births D'ths 1716-1884 2099977
    ENG IOM Douglas BMs 1884-1911 0454979
    ENG IOM Peel Birth Regs 1850-1901 0454963
    ENG IOM Peel Births 1849-1964 0454956
    ENG IOM Peel BMD 1884-1964 0454952
    ENG IOM Peel Death Index 1877-1964 0454958
    IRL Royal Irish Constabulary 0852094
    ITL Udine San Querino Marr 1871-1910 2163739
    NLD AmsterdamNoorderkerkBap1601-34 0113132
    POL Kurowice rc vitals 1859-1901 2395744
    POL Kurowice rc vitals 1859-1901 2395107
     

    A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
    Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.
     News from the trenches

    • Ireland, Armagh. Last week we drew your attention in Additions to our Permanent Collections to a fiche showing the holdings of the Armagh County Museum, the records of which had been filmed by the LDS.  Two patrons have viewed the fiche this week, both seasoned Armagh researchers, and have been thrilled with what they found.  As a result of this one patron ordered three films - so watch the Films Received section in about 3 weeks time for news of their arrival.
    • USA.  Linda Reid, who is not a Mormon, tells me that she recently discovered an ancestor in the new Ancestry.com Passenger List database, arriving at the port of New Orleans.  Knowing that this was a port favoured by Mormons arriving from England she checked the Mormon Immigration Index and, sure enough, found her.  Sue Gest, a Mormon volunteer, suggested that Linda should look for her on www.lds.org for an account of her journey across the plains and again she struck gold, finding an account of the journey in 1856.  To find these records go to this site, select "Church History" and then "Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel 1847-1868".
    Were you aware................ England & Wales.  Manorial Records.  For centuries, the Lords of the Manors owned vast tracts of countryside in England largely divided up into farms and containing the houses in which the farm workers lived. Particularly in the first half of the 20th Century, Death Duties forced a lot of these landowners to sell off their holdings so that most of them now own only the land immediately surrounding the Manor House.  The house in which my son now lives in Datchworth, Hertfordshire was built in 1580 and owned by the Earl of Knebworth and it was not until 1923 that ownership was relinquished.  The house is about 5 miles from Knebworth House and the Earl owned all the land between and a lot more besides. (The Earl now supplements his income by holding an annual outdoor pop-concert in the park).   Joan Read writes to draw our attention to the value of the Manorial Records. 

    "Manorial Records Manorial documents are among the earliest records to chronicle events in the lives of ordinary rural tenants. They include minute books, accounts and maps, but the most relevant documents for the genealogist are Court rolls, rentals and surveys.  Not all our ancestors lived within the jurisdiction of a manor, but for those who did, the records can supplement, and in some cases predate, parish registers. The Court rolls of the Court Baron verify changes in tenancy on the death of a tenant, particularly copyhold tenants. They identify the new heir, and may state the relationship to the previous tenant, making it possible to pinpoint an ancestor on a tract of land. Court rolls also provide lists of jurymen, chosen from the estate tenants, manorial officials, and persons absent from Court. Presentments name those convicted of minor crimes. Rentals, and sometimes surveys, are especially useful as they list all the tenants of a manor, some of whom may sublet the land and live elsewhere. Often the rentals provide information about the lives of our ancestors: the property they lived on, amount of rent paid, the extent and type of land, crops grown, and services due to the lord. The most useful aid for locating the name of the manor, if one knows the parish, is the Victoria County History series. These volumes, some of which are in the Baldwin Room on the 4th floor of the Toronto Reference Library, provide detailed manorial information. Several editions are online at British History Online, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/ Look under Local History. A Victoria County History: lists of contents and place index, can be found online at http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/vch/index.shtml As well, the LDS Church has filmed some volumes, and the films can be ordered from Salt Lake City. Click on: library – catalogue – keyword – Victoria History. Scroll down to the relevant sites. Once the manor has been found, the next step is to locate the documents. Because these records are private rather than public, they are kept in various repositories, frequently far from the original manor. A good starting point is to consult the Manorial Documents Register (MDR) at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk.mdr/ The MDR contains information about the nature and location of surviving documents. It does not contain the documents themselves. The record locations of some counties are searchable online: Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Middlesex, Norfolk, Surrey, the three Ridings of Yorkshire, all of Wales, with Cumberland, Westmorland and part of Lancashire added in November 2006. If the name of the manor is not known, one can search the MDR by parish or county, or use the contact form to email an enquiry. The site has a research guide link. The LDS church has filmed some manorial records. Go to www.familysearch.org  click on: library, library catalogue – place search – land/property or manors. About half of all manors have extant records from 1700 to 1900. Some earlier ones exist also. Until 1733 most records were in Latin. The Medieval Genealogy site at http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/guide/man.shtml has useful information and links". 

     

    Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours:-  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. 

    Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
    24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
    Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.


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    Can I ask once again for questions for The Forum?
     
    In this Bulletin
    • The search for Margaret Logan is described in The Forum
    • A cheaper way to get the details from more recent Scottish Birth Marriage and Death Certificates in Were you aware............
     
    Announcements
    • Christmas Closing.  Our last day will be Friday 22 December and we will reopen on Tuesday, 2 January, 2007.  (For the benefit of new subscribers to the Bulletin this announcement will continue to appear each week).
    • A Musical Celebration of Christmas will be held in the Church on Sunday, 10 December commencing at 7.00 p.m. when the Toronto Stake Choir will be singing traditional and not so well known Christmas carols, the congregation being invited to join in the singing of some of them.
    • We have a few, generally elderly, patrons that do not have computers and fearing that they might not be able to use them properly, do not go out and buy one.  They do not need a sophisticated machine, just something capable of handling email and internet and possibly one of the free genealogical software programmes but it would probably need an operating system not earlier than Windows 98 Second Edition.  It occurs to us that a reader might have something answering this description gathering dust and might be happy to donate it.  We will handle any set-up and basic training that might be required.
    • A reader has 2005 and 2006 issues of Powys, Montgomeryshire and Clwyd Family History Society periodicals to give away.  Anybody interested email the reader direct on berwyn@pathcom.com
     
    Additions to our Permanent Collection
     
    Ireland, Armagh  Armagh County Museum Records, produced by the Northern Ireland Family History Society on one microfiche, kindly donated by Elayne Lockhart. This fiche describes in detail the holdings of the museum that have been filmed by the LDS and demonstrates what an incredible goldmine of data is available.  An absolute must see for any Armagh researcher. (Filed in miscellaneous unnumbered fiche).
     
    The Forum
     
    Answers to Previous Questions
    Q 1/46/2006.  Ireland.  How do I find the birth details of my grandmother and that of any siblings she might have had? Her name was Margaret Logan who was born In Belfast c. 1892 and her parents were William Logan and Mary Jane Conn.  She married Thomas Armstrong Atkinson on September 24, 1918 in Guelph, Ontario.
    Three staff members, myself, Joe Mounsey and Gwen Armstrong each had input to the answer to this question.  The easy answer would be to say "look in the Irish Civil Registration Birth Index films in the Family History Centre" but we went somewhat beyond that.  In the 1911 Census of Canada, lodging at 275 Palmerston Avenue, Toronto is a Margaret Logan born February 1896, living with her father William John Logan her mother Jane and siblings Mary, Jane and William.  If this is "your" Margaret then her birth would seem to have been registered as "Maggie" in the March Qtr. of 1896 in Belfast, Vol. 1, Page 190.  We appreciate that the age shown in the census for this Margaret differs by 4 years from that shown on the marriage certificate for "your" Margaret.  Furthermore, "your" Margaret gives her mother's name as Mary Jane Conn on her marriage certificate whereas when we look at the marriage certificates of the census siblings they give their mother's name as Jane Leith.  There is a marriage in Belfast in 1877 between William Logan and Mary Jane Conn which certainly looks like the parents of your Margaret but we cannot find another Margaret Logan Ontario marriage with a father William that might account for the census Margaret.  We do note, however, that there is a 13 year age difference between Margaret and Thomas Armstrong Atkinson as shown on the marriage certificate so if this Margaret was born later than 1892 she might have had a reason to shrinking the age difference between them. There is the possibility that the 1911 Census family we found has no connection with your family or that William Logan was married a second time.
    As for your future research into this you might like to try to locate Margaret's death and any obituary that might have been published in the hope that names of siblings are shown.  Does her age at death tie up with the age given when she married?  The census William John Logan seems to have died in 1922 and was buried in Prospect Cemetery - does this ring any bells in your family?  We have also noted the births of other Margaret Logans in the Belfast area between 1892 and 1896.  The 1911 Census shows the family referred to above as having arrived in Canada in 1910.  Irish birth certificates for the period in question have been filmed by the LDS; ordering in the appropriate film is the cheapest way of obtaining an Irish birth certificate.  Contact us again if you need further guidance.
     
    Films received in the 7 days ending 23 November 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 21 December 2006
     
    Film Content Film No
    CAN BC Deaths 1927 1952311
    CAN NS Halifax Births 1871-1874 1318355
    CRO Barban RC BMD 1816-1889 2099602
    ENG LAN Parr PR 1846-1908 1849640
    ENG Mil. Rec. 20th Reg. 1760-1854 0872361
    ITL Udine San Querino Bths 1871-1910 2163738
    NDL Hellevoetsluis Birth 1851 Marr 1878- 1340006
    SCT FIF Ferryport on Craig oprs 1040337
    SCT LKS New Monkland PR 1820- 1066601
    UKR Horodnica Births 1852 - 1889 2193632
    UKR L'viv Swirz RC Dths Marr1766-1855 2329180
    USA PA Jefferson Presbyterian PR 1671250
     

    A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
    Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

     
    News from the trenches
     
    Paul Branson writes to enclose a generous donation and to tell us that following a visit to us and from the information we were able to glean regarding the Hooker side of his family and then look-ups of potential relatives on a recent Electoral Roll he was able to contact a relative in England.  "Your going the extra mile on this endeavour has made an elderly man in England and a middle aged guy in Canada, very grateful".
     
    Were you aware..............
     
    Scotland.  The Civil Registration of Births, Marriage and Deaths in Scotland commenced in 1855.  In the Toronto Family History Centre we have the index films covering from 1855 to 1955 for births and to 1956 for marriages and deaths.  After 1929 the indexes show the mother's maiden surname for births and the spouse's surname for marriages.
     
    The Scotland's People website http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/ is a pay-to-view site with a minimum charge of £6 which buys 30 page credits. Entering a name to search for, shall we say, a marriage, will cost 1 credit and then from the list provided if one is able to isolate the marriage required a further 5 credits will bring up an image of the certificate.  Used sensibly and planned so that you are looking for several events - and perhaps with a little bit of luck thrown in - will get you a copy of a certificate for a cost of £1.20. 
     
    But although in New Register House in Edinburgh it is possible to obtain a copy of a certificate of an event which took place as recently as 2004 there are restrictions on what is available from the Scotland's People site.  Births are available only up to 1905, marriages to 1930 and deaths to 1955.  If you want to discover details of an event outside these years you can apply to the Scottish GRO who will search a five year period for £5 and then, if an appropriate entry is found, will provide a certified copy of the certificate for a further charge of £8 - so £13 in all.  (£13 is around $29 at today's exchange rate)
     
    There is, however, a cheaper way for readers of this Bulletin.  Your editor has made arrangements with an Edinburgh researcher who will look up, transcribe and email the details shown on any certificate where you have identified the event on the index films for a standard charge of $10.  This charge will also apply to events outside the years covered by the index films which are easily identifiable but a greater charge might apply if a long period of years are going to have to be searched for a common name.  You can email your requirements to pgoddard@interlog.com or to Toronto_FHC@bellnet.ca  You will be told in advance if a charge greater than $10 is going to apply.
     
     
    Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours:- 
     
    Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m. 
    Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
    Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.
    Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
    Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
    Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon.
     
    Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line.
     
    Toronto Family History Centre
    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
    24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
    Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

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    In this Bulletin
    • The remaining British India films arrive - Additions to our Permanent Collections
    • News of the arrival on Ancestry.com of a huge passenger list database in Were you aware...........
    • Although, from a genealogical point of view the Baltic Germans might be relevant to only a small number of the readers of this Bulletin,  from a historical and sociological standpoint I would encourage everybody to read this piece in Were you aware............
    • Something of interest to any reader who ever served in the UK Armed Forces - Army, Navy or Air Force in Were you aware...........
    Announcements
    • Christmas Closing.  Our last day will be Friday 22 December and we will reopen on Tuesday, 2 January, 2007.  (For the benefit of new subscribers to the Bulletin this announcement will continue to appear each week).
    • James Thomson notes that The Dominion Institute has initiated an online petition in support of offering a state funeral for the last veteran of the First World War resident in Canada: http://www.dominion.ca/petition/
    Additions to our Permanent Collections
     
    British India.  The last batch of these films complementing our existing collection have now arrived.  The details of these films were described in Bulletin 42/2006.
     
    Film Content Film No
    IND Bengal Bapt Indx 1841-1850 0498513
    IND Bengal Bapt Indx 1851-1859 0498514
    IND Bengal Bapt Indx 1896-1904 M-Z 0498522
    IND Madras Burials Indx 1851-1859 0498596
     
    The Forum
     
    Answers to Previous Questions.
    Q1/37/2006.  Ukraine.  Information on Catholic priests in the Ukraine.  Sonia van Heerden writes to advise us that Directories of Greek Catholic Priests in the Ukraine for the years 1848, 1885 and 1900 are on LDS Film No. 1764234.
    New Questions.
    Q 1/46/2006.  Ireland.  How do I find the birth details of my grandmother and that of any siblings she might have had? Her name was Margaret Logan who was born In Belfast c. 1892 and her parents were William Logan and Mary Jane Conn.  She married Thomas Armstrong Atkinson on September 24, 1918 in Guelph, Ontario.
    Q2/46/2006. Canada.  (Related to the question above). Can I find out when my relatives came to Canada?  My grandparents(above) were here in 1918 and was probably here in 1910 with his mother Mary Poole Atkinson Phipps, stepfather Thomas Phipps and half-sister Mary Annie Gibson Phipps who married John Fox in Toronto on November 16, 1910.
     
    Films received in the 7 days ending 16 November 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 14 December, 2006.
     
    Film Content Film No
    CAN ON Peterborough Marr 1923 2266929
    CAN ON Toronto Marriages 1923 2266884
    DEU POM Greifenberg BMD 1795-1826 1273264
    DEU POM Greifenberg BMD 1827-1853 1273265
    ENG LND Rec Copy Will 1898 'B' 1885308
    IND Bengal PR Vol 534-535 Jul-Sep1931 0526449
    ITL Regio di Calabria Ardore B 1831-59 1448852
    ITL Regio di Calabria Benestare B 1889 1800909
    JAM Westmorland D 1878-1995 1523603
    PHI Bulacan Meycauayan bap 1883-93 1128521
    PHI Bulacan Meycauayan bap 1894- 1128522
    PHI Bulacan Meycauayan bap 1903-11 1128523
    PHI Ilocos Sur Santa Lucia mar 1853-94 1210392
    PHI Ilocos Sur Tagudin bap 1858-1871 1214471
    PHI Pangasinan Binalonan bap 1845-62 1209457
    PHI Pangasinan Binalonan bap 1863-82 1209458
    POL Belezyce RC PR 1695-1809 0937472
    POL Przasnysz RC PR Births 1891-00 2084388
    UKR Horodnica Births 1872 - 1909 2193633
    UKR L'viv Swirz RC births 1784-1857 0766104
    UKR L'viv Swirz RC births 1784-1858 0766103
    UKR L'viv Swirz RC Dths Marr1766-1891 2329181
    UKR Stanislau Grk Cath birth 1879-90 2395672
    USA IL Livingston Co Births 1880-1882 1392966
    USA TN Maury Co Estate Recs "W" 2251603
     

    A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
    Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

     

    News from the trenches

     

    Linda Gilpin writes:

    "I am a novice in genealogy of less than one year. My father, John Horace Gilpin died on October 26, 2006 at age 97. On the day of his funeral, I received from a family member a copy of a letter written in 1982 from his niece in British Columbia asking for information on the family. Because of that letter I have spoken in the past 3 days to 4 family members in B.C. for the first time, 2 of whom are keenly interested in genealogy. In fact, one new-found cousin of mine had recently visited Ontario and had gone to Lefroy to find my grandfather Gilpin's general store and found it is being renovated into a cafe. There is a 1902 picture of the store in the 1984 historical review of the town of Innisfil. Anyway, we are all excited to have found each other."
     
    Were you aware.................
    • U.S.A.  Ancestry.com have recently uploaded the details of 70 million passengers and crew of ships arriving at U.S. ports making the total number of names on this particular database now exceeding 100 million.  For the period 1819 to 1893 passenger lists would show the passengers port of embarkation, name, age and occcupation.  For the period 1893 to 1906 this was supplemented by details of marital status, last place of residence and final destination in the U.S. and then after 1906 they would also show the passenger's height, complexion, hair colour and birthplace.  This database is available free of charge at the Toronto Family History Centre but the great thing is that up to 30 November it is also available free of charge on your home computer.
    • Germany, Poland, Baltic and other European Countries.  In Bulletin 38/2006 a question was asked as to where one could obtain birth, marriage and death details of people who were “repatriated” to Germany from the Baltic countries in WW2.  A reply was posted in Bulletin 40/2006 but we now find, thanks to information provided by Leona Gislason, that our answer was not comprehensive.                                                                                                                                   In August 1939 Hitler and Stalin agreed on a plan to carve up Europe with the Baltic countries – Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia – falling under the Soviet sphere.  On September 1, 1939 German forces invaded Poland and by the end of that month brought it under direct German control. Poland was divided between the Warthegau (Posen, Lodz) to the west and the General Government (Warsaw, Krakow) to the east. Just a few days later on October 4, 1939 Hitler made a speech in the Reichstag laying out his plans for the resettlement of Europe along ethnic lines.  There were substantial populations of people of German origin in all the Baltic countries, many of whom had been there for generations.  Pointing out that he could not offer any protection to them in the event that they were attacked by the indigenous populations Hitler “invited” them to return to their homeland.  Caught between a rock and a hard place over 500,000 people accepted the Fuhrer’s invitation.  The plan can only be described as diabolically brilliant.  The returning Baltic Germans were to be resettled in the General Government.   To make room for them the indigenous Polish population and the Jewish population was to be moved out with their property confiscated and handed over to the returning Germans in compensation for the property they had left behind in the Baltic countries.  Most of the Jewish population were sent to concentration camps while the Poles were to be used as slave labour in Germany.  The returning Germans of military age were available for conscription into the German army, the Poles that were moved out were not available for any resistance movement that might spring up in occupied Poland while the Germans outside military age having been resettled in Poland could be counted on for loyalty to Germany rather than to Poland. At the same time a large labour force was made available in Germany to replace the German men who had been called up for military service.  But first of all the returning Germans had to satisfy the authorities that they were ethnically pure Germans and to this end everybody over the age of 15 was to be interviewed and had to provide evidence of their place of birth, their parents and grandparents dates and places of birth and marriage together with details of property they owned and places where they had lived in the Baltic countries.  As the war progressed ethnic Germans living in France, Yugoslavia, Romania, Bulgaria and the Ukraine were also “repatriated” to Germany, many of them to the Warthegau. And this veritable treasure trove of genealogical information is available to researchers in the form of records of 2.1 million people, a lot of it being on LDS films.  To get at this information is a 2-step process.  The first stage is to consult the alphabetical card index known as the E/G Kartei which are contained on 1,964 microfilms.  To find the film containing details of your ancestor perform a Film/Fiche search in the Family History Library Catalog on www.familysearch.org inserting the number 1797322.  However, the index is phonetical so a surname beginning with 'W' might be found under 'V'.  This film will provide you with details such as date and place of birth but perhaps more importantly it will give you the file number for the Stammblatter series where you can expect to find a full family pedigree. These files are on 750 microfilms commencing with film number  1796579. A very good description of this period of history together with details of the information you can expect to find on both series of films is on www.volhynia.com/EWZmain
    • U.K. Veterans Badge.  Diana Davies has drawn to my attention that anyone who served in the U.K. Armed Forces before and during WW2 and at any time up to 31 December 1969 is entitled to a Veterans Lapel Badge.  The badge is very handsome in gold and enamel and comes in a nice presentation box.  You can apply online for the badge details of which are on http://www.veteransagency.mod.uk/vets_badge/vets_badge.htm  I am not an habitual badge wearer but, you never know, you might see me yet with my badge.
     
     
    Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours:- 
     
    Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m. 
    Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
    Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.
    Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
    Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
    Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon.
     
    Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line.
     
    Toronto Family History Centre
    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
    24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
    Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

    We are still requiring questions for The Forum.  And it would be nice to hear of a bizarre entry, a research breakthrough, a strange coincidence, a stroke of luck for News from the trenches.
     
    In this Bulletin
    • More British India Films in Additions to our Permanent Collections
    • We draw your attention to online resources for research in British Columbia, Manitoba and Saskatchewan in Were you aware........
    • A give-away in Announcements
     
    Announcements
    • Christmas Closing.  Our last day will be Friday 22 December and we will reopen on Tuesday, 2 January 2007.  (For the benefit of new subscribers to the Bulletin this announcement will continue to appear each week).
    • The 4th Line Theatre Company which has an excellent reputation for producing first class plays with a local historic interest is holding a reading from a new play "The Right Road to Pontypool" at 2 p.m. on Sunday 12 November at Peterborough Centennial Musuem & Archives, 300 Hunter Street.  Admission is free. The Right Road to Pontypool’ is based on the Toronto Jewish community’s summer resort experience in Pontypool during the first half of the 20th century.  In the midst of this quiet farming community, the largest Jewish vacation resort in Canada was established.  Thousands of people arrived to enjoy the pleasures of the pond and the fresh country air.  For over fifty years they came, but there remains almost no evidence of the thousands of lives that passed through this out-of-the-way corner of Ontario.
    • A generous patron has a 4-drawer, letter size filing cabinet to give away.  First come first served but you have to pick up the cabinet from Thornhill.
    Additions to our Permanent Collections
     
    USA, NY, Duchess Co. The Nine Partners Patent.  The story of a land grant to "the Nine Partners" of 145,000 acres including a 4 mile frontage to the Hudson River which it seems was acquired at the end of the 17th Century from the Indians in exchange for a few hatchets and guns. On 9 microfiche no. 6088543.
     
    British India.  A further set of films have arrived to complement our existing collection the details of which were described in Bulletin 42/2006.  These are:
     
     
    Film Content Film No
    IND Bengal Bapt Indx 1860-1867 0498515
    IND Bengal Bapt Indx 1868-1875 A-K 0498516
    IND Bengal Bapt Indx 1876-1884 0498518
    IND Bengal Bapt Indx 1935-1942 0498530
    IND Bengal Bths Marr Bur 1835 0498572
    IND Bengal Bur Indx 1908-1918 0498553
    IND Bengal Bur Indx 1933-1945 0498555
    IND Bombay Bapt Indx 1871-1885 0498559
    IND Bombay Bapt Indx 1886-1898 0498560
    IND Bombay Marr Indx 1709-1859 0498563
    IND Madras Bapt Indx 1698-1820 0498574
    IND Madras Marr Indx 1851-1870 0498587
     
    The Forum
     
    Answers to Previous Questions
     
    Q2/43/2006.  Genealogy Generally.  This is a further comment on the merits, and otherwise, of various genealogy software programmes.  Eve Zuber writes:-
    "From the software list included in the bulletin, only PAF5.2 supports multilingual character sets. Only in PAF5.2 you can have all the names/places and notes entered on one page/screen in multiple languages with all proper accents and diactrical marks. Very important feature, if one has the ancestors from different, non-English speaking, countries. Other software packages do not support this feature".
     
    Films received in the 7 days ending 9 November 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 7 December 2006.
     
     
    Film Content Film No

    CAN ON Marriages 1923 2266883
    CAN ON Wellington-Wentworth Marr 1923 2266941
    ENG KEN Sheerness Dockyard PR 1818341
    ENG GLS Bristol St James M 1785-1812 1596537
    ENG KEN Brenchley PR 1560-1858 0992456
    ENG KEN Brenchley PR 1754-1876 0992457
    ENG KEN Minster Parish Chest 1751961
    ENG LAN Colton BTs 1676 - 1825 1040301
    ENG LND Rec Copy Will 1905 Oct. C-T 1885845
    ENG NTT SuttonUponTrent BT 1813-38 0504538
    IND Bengal Bapt 1873 Jul-Sep 0499051
    Isle of Man Will Index 1659-1949 0106366
    JAM Death Index 1900-1916 1563514
    NLD Strijen M 1795-1811 0120814
    POL Belezyce RC PR 1605-1698 0937471
    POL Ciechanow RC PR Births 1891-6 2084384
    POL Przasnysz RC PR Births 1890-95 2101694
    SCT ROX Crailing OPR 1708-1819 1067933
    USA IL Livingston Co Births 1878-1880 1392965
    USA TN Marshall Co. Prob. Rec 1839- 0976372
    USA TN Maury Co Wills 1808-1825 0024765

     

    A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
    Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

     
    Were you aware...............
     
    Ontario.  Further to the piece in last week's Bulletin regarding Ontario records, Linda Reid writes to point out that there is an excellent collection of Tombstone Inscriptions (TI's) available in the Canadiana Room of the North York Central Library.  These represent the transcriptions made by various Ontario Genealogical Society branches for the cemeteries in their areas.
     
    And we draw to your attention on-line sites available if you are searching for genealogical data relating to:
     
    Baptisms Index 1836-1885 (one has to go to the original church record to obtain the full details).  Civil Registration indexes:  Births 1872-1903, Marriages 1872-1930, Deaths 1872-1985.  The index shows the GSU (LDS) film number which will contain the actual certificate.  These films can be ordered at the Toronto Family History Centre.
     
    Manitoba. http://web2.gov.mb.ca/cca/vital/Query.php 

    Births more than 100 years ago
    Marriages more than 80 years ago
    Deaths more than 70 years ago 

    Birth Index gives name, date and place of birth and parents names. Marriage Index gives name of spouse, date and place of marriage. Death Index gives name, date and place of death and age at death. Usually women were indexed under married name only. Copies must be ordered from the Manitoba government. Once you select a name, you can print off an application form. Copies can be ordered by mail or fax and cost $12.00 each.Saskatchewan.  http://vsgs.health.gov.sk.ca/vsgs_srch.aspIndex is not completed yet – only births more than 100 years ago online. Deaths (more than 70 years ago) and marriages (more than 75 years ago) are not yet available but coming on line soon. Index gives name, date and place of birth and parents names. Certificates must be ordered from the Saskatchewan government. Once you select a name, you can print off an application form. Certificates can be ordered by mail or fax and cost $50.00 each.

     

    It is important to note that Saskatchewan did not become a province until 1905. Registrations were sketchy up until the 1920’s. Especially for people living in rural locations and immigrants who did not speak English.

     

    Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours:-  Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m.  Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.  Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon. Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line. Toronto Family History CentreChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
    24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
    Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

     


    Lots of email this week from our readers but no new questions have been posed.  We still require more questions for The Forum.
     
    In this Bulletin
    • A lengthy discussion of the merits, and otherwise, of various genealogical software programmes in The Forum
    • We draw your attention to the increasing amount of Ontario genealogical information that is available in Toronto in Were you aware...............
    Announcements
    • Christmas Closing.  Our last day will be Friday 22 December and we will reopen on Tuesday, 2 January 2007.  (For the benefit of new subscribers to the Bulletin this announcement will continue to appear each week).
    The Forum
     
    Answers to Previous Questions
     
    Q1/43/2006.  England Information on a Frank Hines, a policeman in Sunderland in the 1960's.  As you have no knowledge of his birth, his parents, his marriage or whether he is dead or alive - and the only Frank Hines of Sunderland who died between 1984 and 2004 proved not to be the correct Frank Hines - the only suggestion we can make is that you contact the police authorities in Sunderland to see if they can help you.
     
    Q2/43/2006.  Genealogy Generally  1. The material that you can download from your website - is there any way you can print it out so that it all connects?  Although there are ways, in some cases, that you could link data it is not a course we would recommend - each entry should be checked for the data source to ensure that you are not repeating an error in the data.  2.  If not, what software are researchers particularly satisfied with?  Many readers of the Bulletin were good enough to let us have their opinions which we have sorted out under the various software programmes and repeat below.
     
    Personal Ancestral File (PAF)
    • "PAF works well but it is not a simple process as there are multi-steps involved.  I have used PAF 5.2 to merge IGI records, downloaded from The Family History site, into my existing PAF tree. Once the files are match/merged and linked you can then print PAF reports which show how things are connected. The PAF Help facility gives good guidelines, see the chapters on "Importing GEDCOM files" & "Managing .paf files" - "How to combine .paf files""
    Another comment on PAF
    • + free
      + comes in many languages
      + great for LDS church members doing church genealogy
      - pedigree charts are OK but not great
      - need to purchase a separate program to get better charts
      - entering sources can be a bit tricky
       
    "Legacy
    • "I particularly like Legacy which is free for the basic programme.  I had Family Tree Maker but find Legacy better.  You can download Legacy 5.0 free by going into Legacy on the internet. One is able to put pictures in very easily.  There are various reports that can be printed.  If you want the Deluxe edition it can be downloaded quickly too for a small amount of money."
    • "+ very easy to learn and use
      + good for LDS church members doing church genealogy".
    The Master Genealogist (TMG)
    • "We use TMG and like it very much.  But it is expensive because it has to be updated to a new version about every year.  (I think that a new version is about to be released.)  It can be made as complicated and detailed as you like but it can also be used very simply.  It has strong report writing features.  We have also set up a databse of all the films we have viewed and what we found in general terms on a TMG database.  This idea came from one of their users.  They have a strong user group and we have found their email help to be good - they reply within 24 - 48 hours."

    • "-not a beginners program it was developed for professional genealogists and is not easy to learn or use
      + ability to include many different types of records"
    Brother's Keeper
    • "I started using Brother’s Keeper back in the days of DOS (pre Windows).  Of the 20 – 30 programs I looked at back then, including some of the big name programs of the day, it was the most user friendly.  I entered about 500 names, and did other routines, without the use of a manual or help.  The reports and charts will match any of the major genealogy programs, including pictures in many of them.  I actually prefer the register book from BK rather than the other programs.  Brother’s Keeper is a shareware program, costing $45.00 USD, and once you have registered, you can download all subsequent updates at no additional charge.  Also, once you register, if you have a problem, I have had my email answered usually within a day.  One nice advantage with the program is that you can download (www.bkwin.com) it for free and try it out.  Some things do not work unless you register, but you can get a good look at the program free of charge.  The only drawback that I know of is that BK will not run on Mac."

    • "+prints nice charts
      + easy to learn and use"
    Family Tree Maker
    • "+ not as easy as Legacy but not difficult to use
      + nice charts, can be as simple or as detailed as you like
      - found entering sources a bit tricky"

     and

    and 
          Editor's Comment:  I fear that the questioner might now be more confused than ever.  My suggestion is that you start off with one of the free download programmes and as you gain experience you could always change to another programme later.
     
     
    Films received in the 7 days ending 2 November 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 30 November 2006.
     
    Film Content Film No
    CAN NS Halifax Co Births 1874-1877 1318356
    CAN NS Halifax Co Marriages 1864-75 1318116
    CAN PQ St Ignace PR 1833-1848 1031508
    CAN PQ St Ignace PR 1849-1862 1031509
    CAN PQ St Ignace PR 1863-1876 1031510
    DEU BAD Karlsruhe Evang PR 1806- 1189240
    ENG DEV Bow PR 1598-1836 0916819
    ENG KEN Sheldwich BT 1603-1813 1737007
    GBR Military records WO97 0861705
    GRENADA Index Probate 1908-1927 1563253
    GRENADA Index Probate 1918-1922 1563489
    IND Bengal PR Apr-Jun 1920 0527919
    ITL Regio di Calabria Agnana BMD 1895 1801703
    NLD Watergraafsmeer CivilReg 1652-1811 0114957
    PHI Bulacan Meycauayan bap 1872-83 1128457
    PHI La Union San Juan bap 1898-1903 1209825
    PHI Pangasinan Binalonan mar 1899- 1209736
    PHI Pangasinan Binalonan mar 1915-35 1209737
    POL Opinogora RC PR 1866-1892 1895421
    UKR Stanislau Grk Catholic inventory 2390034
    USA NJ Vit Rec Indx B'ths P-S 1848-78 0493690
    USA NJ Vit Rec Indx D'ths G-Z 1868-78 0493701
    USA NY Utica Pres pr 1813-1852 0534223
    USA OH Union County History 1000347
    USA WI Neillsville Luth PR 1886-1936 1401775

    A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
    Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

     

    Were you aware............

    An increasing amount of Ontario genealogical data is becoming readily available.  Mary Crandall has kindly provided me with the following information:-

    The finding of a vital statistic registration (i.e. births, deaths & marriages) is a two step process.  First, you need consult  an index film to find the registration number & year of the event that you are interested in; then you  can find the registration on one of the many films that contain the registrations themselves.  The index films are available at both the North York library  (Yonge & Empress) & the Ontario Archives, but only the Ontario Archives have the films of the registrations themselves.

    Civil registration began in Ontario on 1 July 1869.   At the moment birth records to 1909 are publicly available as are marriage records to 1924 and death records to 1934. 
    Ancestry.ca (available on only one computer at the Toronto Family History Centre) has the bulk of these registrations online (births to 1907, marriages to 1922 & deaths to 1932), but if you are interested in the subsequent two years, a trip to the Ontario Archives is the quickest way to get a copy of the document (or you can order the film through your library or LDS center)  

    For records prior to 1869 - what the records that have survived are not complete.  They are mostly church records.  Birth & death records from prior to 1869 are especially scarce

    There is a collection of  County Registers for (some of ) the marriages that occurred between 1858 and July 1869.   These have been published by globalgenealogy and are widely available in libraries.  If you want to find the marriages on microfilm, they are the MS 248 series of films, available at the Ontario Archives.  These are not on ancestry.ca  but some transcriptions are available online at http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~maryc/thisisit.htm (some of the 1923 marriage records are also here)

    For marriages between 1801 and 1858, there are District Marriage registers.    For a complete listing of the District marriage registers that have survived, see
    http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/interloan/v-mdistrict-t.htm

    Censuses.  See Bulletin 43/2006 for a description of the 1851/2 Census.  The 1901 Census (freely available on www.automatedgenealogy.com shows the date of birth (not just the age) against each entry.  The 1911 Census (on the same site) is partially indexed.

    Passenger Lists.  See Bulletin 43/2006 for details.

    Probate records
    The  Ontario Archives has a large collection of Probate and Surrogate court records dating from 1793 to 1963.  Records after 1963 are available only through the courthouse  the County or District where the will was probated or the estate administered.
    details: http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/interloan/c-efile.htm

    Newspapers
    There are least 3 good sources of newspapers (on microfilm) in Toronto.
    The Ontario Archives have older newspapers (especiallyy pre-1930) and almost exclusively from Ontario.  The Canadiana Room at the North York library has a good collection of Toronto and Winnipeg newspapers.  Lastly, in the basement of the Toronto Reference Library is a large collection of more recent newspapers from a number of Canadian towns & cities.

    Online newspapers:
    Paper of Record at http://www.paperofrecord.com  contains images of  many papers from around the world, 52 from Ontario alone with dates ranging from 1833 to 2003. 
    This site does require a subscription but it is searchable.

    Cemetery records
    The best collection of tombstone inscription transcriptions is at the Toronto Reference library - in their genealogy section on the 4th floor.   These are in book format.
    The Ontario Archives has some on microfilm but not nearly as many as the library.

    Holdings of the Toronto library system can be searched online at http://www.tpl.toronto.on.ca/

    Ontario Archives
    home - http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/index.html
    vital stats - http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/interloan/vsmain.htm

    The Archives of Ontario's Main Reading Room is located at 77 Grenville Street, Toronto. This room is open 8:15 am to 10:30 pm Monday to Friday and 10:00 am to 8:00 pm on Saturday. Reference staff are available to assist you from 8:15 am to 5:00 pm on weekdays.  Take photo ID with you as you will need to register to get in.

     
     
    Toronto Family History Centre Current Opening Hours:- 
     
    Monday 9.30 a.m to 4 p.m. 
    Tuesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
    Wednesday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m.
    Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon and 6.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
    Friday 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
    Saturday 9.30 a.m. to 12 noon.
     
    Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line.
     
    Toronto Family History Centre
    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
    24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
    Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.


    Questions are still required for future Bulletins.
     
    In this Bulletin
    • More questions and answers on diverse subjects in The Forum
    • News respecting passenger lists and the 1851/2 Census of Canada,  (Were you aware........)
    Announcements
    • Christmas Closing.  Our last day will be Friday, 22 December and we will reopen on Tuesday, 2 January, 2007. (For the benefit of new subscribers to the Bulletin this announcement will continue to appear each week).
     
    Additions to our Permanent Collections
    • England, Northamptonshire, Crick.  Baptisms 1813-1874, Marriages 1754-1812, Burials 1813-1900 (contained on microfiche nos: 6127168, 6127171, 6127172, 6127176).
    The Forum
     
    Answers to Previous Questions
    Q2/42/2006. England.  How do I find the birth record of someone who was born in Devonport, Devon around 1830 since no church records for this place seem to be in the LDS catalogue?

    Several readers were kind enough to respond to this question.

    Devonport did not have a parish church at the time of your ancestor’s birth but was within the parish of Stoke Damerel.  Unfortunately films of this Parish Register are not available through the Family History Library neither have the baptism records been transcribed in the on-going Parish Clerk project.  However the Devon Family Society has transcribed the baptism records from 1813 to 1839 and you can purchase copies of their Baptism Books from them on www.devonfhs.org.uk/publications.htm There is a book for each year for Stoke Damerel at a cost of £3 each including overseas airmail. (You should perhaps note that East Stonehouse is an adjoining parish and the parish church could possibly have been closer to your ancestor in Devonport than the church at Stoke Damerel.  If you draw a blank with Stoke Damerel it might be worth trying East Stonehouse - with the same record problems as described for Stoke Damerel).

    Q3/42/2006.  Italy/U.S.A. 1) and 2) How far back are birth/marriage/death records available for Italy and are these records available from the LDS?

    One cannot lay down hard and fast rules as to the availability of records for Italy.  There are no national registration records for Births, Marriages and Deaths but nevertheless a huge amount of data is available within each province and, so far as Civil Registration is concerned, usually recorded in the major city.  A search of the Family History Library Catalog reveals that for Palermo, Civil Registration records of Births, Marriages and Death are available from 1820 to 1908, contained on 1,590 microfilms.  Again in Palermo, for example, the church register of San Giacomo alla Marina (just one of many churches) covers the period 1392-1868 on 52 films.  For Milano the Civil Registration records cover the period 1866 to 1929 on 936 films.  However for Firenze there does not appear to be any Civil Registration records available through the LDS but some church records are available such as the church of Santa Maria del Fiore where the records cover the period 1450 to 1900 on 81 films.

    3)  Tracing the new name of an immigrant to America who changed his name in the 1920's or '30's.

    Although each state makes provision for the legal change of one's name we have been unable to find published records of name changes.  However we have come across numerous instances where an immigrant has arrived in his new country with a different name to what he possessed in his country of birth.  There are, no doubt, many reasons for doing this - escaping the law, fleeing from creditors, bigamy etc but the most common reason must be, in the case of immigrants to North America, the wish to Anglicize the name - both given and surname - to make life simpler.  In some cases an Anglicized phonetic version of the original name is adopted and in other cases an approximate translation into English of the original name is employed.  For example the common Italian name Pescatore becomes Fisher.  Another method of discovering the new name, provided that your subject was in the USA by 1930 is to employ a search on Ancestry.com of this Census using as much information as you have (such as age, country of birth, forename of spouse, the state in which he resided) but leaving, for example, the surname blank.  Good luck!

    New Questions

    Q1/43/2006.  England.  A relative, Frank Hines (he may have spelt his name differently - perhaps Hinds or Hind) was a policeman in Sunderland, Co. Durham, in the 1960s.  I'm trying to trace his leg of my tree but haven't been able to locate him (he's probably deceased).  Where can I obtain information about his police service and, hopefully, address info. and next of kin in the 1960s?  I don't know when he was born or the name of any wife or children he might have had.

    Q2/43/2006.  Genealogy Generally.  The Family Tree material that you can download from your website, is there any way you can print it out so that everything connects?  If not, what geneology software are researchers particularly satisfied with? (Note from Editor - I would very much appreciate comments from users of free downloadable software such as PAF as well as users of commercial software such as Master Genealogist and Family Tree Maker).

    Films received in the 7 days ending 26 October 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 23 November 2006.

    Film Content Film No

    1340006
    CAN Br. Forces in Canada 1757-1899'G' 1711654
    CAN ON Bruce Co Marrs 1924 1838202
    CAN ON Huron Co Marrs 1923 2266895
    CAN ON Leeds Marrs 1923 2266925
    DEU PRE Tilsit Bapt 1862-1874 1813538
    ENG Mil. Rec. 20th Reg. 1760-1854 0872361
    ENG WAR Monumental Inscriptions 0476975
    NLD Amst'dam Noorderkerk Bapt 1641- 0113157
    NLD Amsterdam Death Indx 1553-1650 0540396
    PHL Meycauan Bapt 1845-1872 1128456
    PHL Santa Cruz Register 1852-1858 1213859
    PHL Santa Cruz Register 1852-1858 1213860
    PHL Santa Lucia Bapt 1860-1872 1210387
    POL Brieg Evangelische Kirche 0879606
    POL LU Chodel RC PR 1591-1758 0937488
    POL Seilec Gk. Cath. Pr 1841 0766089
    RUS BES Albota bapt 1880-1940 LS 1198658
    RUS BES Albota bapt 1880-1940 RS 1198657
    SCT ANG Arbroath Burials 1825-1854 0993333
    USA MI Wayne Co. birth 1880-1882 1377660
    USA MI Wayne Co. birth 1895-1896 1377673
    USA MI Wayne Co. birth 1896-1897 1377674
    USA MI Wayne Co. marr 1873-1880 1377623
    USA MI Wayne Co. marr 1878-1884 1377624

    A patron wishing to view a film ordered by another patron should check first with staff.  The patron who ordered the film will always have priority.
    Any patron may renew a film ordered by another patron although the original patron's name will continue to appear on the label.  The description of the film given above may not be a full description.  A film number search in the Family History Library Catalog will reveal the full content of the film.  The geographical abbreviations used above are based on the Chapman codes.

    Were you aware..................
     
    Passenger Lists and Canadian Census Records.  James Thomson writes: "With apologies to those of you who have received notes of these things from me on earlier occasions, here are three recent or pending developments which may be of considerable interest to many readers of the Bulletin:
     
    Passenger Lists
    (a)  Library and Archives Canada has uploaded digital images of a great number of its passenger lists for vessels arriving in Canadian ports between 1865 and 1922; others will follow shortly. There is an introduction to these records at http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/passenger/index-e.html ; this page also provides links to a more detailed Online Help page and a Search screen. Although one can search by ship name, shipping line, port of arrival or departure, and year or date of arrival or departure, it is not possible to search in this database by passenger name; however, some nominal indexes to passengers (for various ports of arrival and various date ranges) do exist or are in preparation, and these are surveyed at http://www.collectionscanada.ca/genealogy/022-908.003-e.html It will be interesting to see whether Ancestry.ca considers these lists to be good candidates for indexing; I have no knowledge of this one way or the other.
     
    (b) 1837Online.com (soon to have a new name) has now started digitizing and indexing The National Archives (at Kew, in England) record series BT 27: Board of Trade Passenger Lists, Outwards, 1890-1960. These are passenger lists for ships leaving the UK (and, for 1890-1922, ports now in the Republic of Ireland) for final destinations outside Europe (or the Mediterranean) - hence they will include not only those going to North America, but also those bound for Australia, New Zealand and South Africa etc. Indeed, the lists may be of even broader interest than one might assume, in that they include not only emigrants, but also those travelling for any other reason, as well as many non-UK residents whose voyage overseas departed from the British Isles. What a prospectively huge boon for those whose family members made an overseas trip between 1890 and 1960! The data will be made available through the pay-to-view site www.ancestorsonboard.com ; see the site for more information, and to have one's name added to a mailing list. 
     
    1851/2 Census of Canada
    Ancestry.ca's nominal index to the extant parts of the 1851/52 census (of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia), linked to images, has now launched: http://content.ancestry.ca/iexec/?htx=List&dbid=1061 At this point in time, Ancestry is providing free access to this database, upon registration, as a promotion. Here are some small suggestions about using this database:
     
    (i) If you find an interesting entry in a Personal Schedule and/or Agricultural Schedule from the 1851/52 census for Ontario or Quebec, remember that the digital image linked to the index entry only contains the first few columns of information recorded by the enumerator. To access images of such additional information as may be available, click on the "Next" icon (containing a right-pointing arrow) immediately above the first image; if all columns of either type of schedule are available in this way, one may need to do this more than once to access anything recorded in the final columns. This may be well worth doing - I have been looking at one entry in an Agricultural Schedule for which the final, "Remarks" column contains the enumerator's note "The Indian Corn Crops destroyed by squirrels in this section"! Before moving forward from the first image, make a note of the row number to the left of an entry of interest, as this will help identify the correct row in the following images.
     
    (ii) Another item of great interest just above the image is, naturally, the zoom setting (which is a box containing a % - perhaps about 15% when the image first loads). By clicking on the down arrow key just to the right of the box, and choosing a much greater % zoom setting, one can of course dramatically increase the magnification.
     
    (iii) Finally, don't count on the Personal Schedule and the Agricultural Schedule relating to the same individual being indexed under the same spellings of first name or last name; I have already come across more than one instance of variant spellings in a limited amount of searching. At the very least, it may be useful to do Soundex searches (in the search screen, click on "Exact Matches Only", and then change the selection in the "Spelling" box to Soundex). Agricultural Schedules, where available, will only be indexed under the name of the head of the household, and the index entries for them will not contain any information about Estimated Birth Year or Birthplace (as this information was only recorded in the Personal Schedules)."
     
     
    Current Opening Hours:- 
     
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    Should you decide that you no longer wish to receive this bulletin, return this email with the word "Delete" in the subject line.
     
    Toronto Family History Centre
    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
    24 Ferrand Drive (Don Mills & Eglinton)
    Phone: 416 422 5480 Ext. 111.

    TOP

    TUGG HOMEPAGE


    In this Bulletin
    • A description of the British India films that we announced recently in Additions to our Permanent Collections
    • More questions in The Forum
    • A story of an incredible stroke of luck in News from the trenches
    • We draw your attention to another huge database that has become available in Were you aware...............
    Announcements
    • Christmas Closing.  Our last day will be Friday, 22 December and we will reopen on Tuesday, 2 January, 2007. (For the benefit of new subscribers to the Bulletin this announcement will continue to appear each week).
    Additions to our Permanent Collections
     
    British India

    James Thomson writes “The arrival at the Toronto Family History Centre this year of more than 70 films of indexes to copies of baptismal, marriage and burial registers from British India represents a significant addition to the substantial range of British India research resources available in Toronto. The indexes (and the registers in turn) are arranged by administrative areas called Presidencies, and so it is helpful, if possible, to have a sense of which Presidency (Bengal, Bombay or Madras) one would like to start with. If one believes a family to have been connected with a particular place, but doesn‘t know the Presidency in which that place was found, try the finding aid at http://www.bl.uk/collections/oiocfamilyhistory/familyindiamap.html.

     

    The index films acquired generally bear film numbers between 0498574 and 0498600 (for Madras); or between 0498511 and 0498556 (for Bengal) ; or between 0498557 and 0498573 (for Bombay). For the contents of individual films, search on any film number in one of the above ranges using a Film/Fiche search in the Family History Library Catalog at www.familysearch.org.

     

    To this point, only about 68 of the 90 films have been acquired; vital event indexes for date ranges not represented in the films obtained to date are, in whole or part, available online. I am developing a guide, to be lodged at the staff desk at the Centre, giving the web addresses of such (partial or complete) online indexes; this guide will be updated as and when any more index films are acquired. If a reference is found in a film or online index, a copy of the (baptismal, marriage or burial) entry itself will generally be available on film from Salt Lake City ; the guide also will assist with the ordering process.

     

    The collection as it stands also includes the following:

    (a) Films 0498602, 0498603 and 0527435, all of which are described on Cathy Day’s splendid site at http://members.ozemail.com.au/~clday/non_pres.htm

    (b) Film 2046671 (containing probate indexes, as described in the Family History Library Catalog)

     

    Finally, the British India collection is complemented by two films of Catholic registers from Goa, in Portuguese India; these are films 1357994 and 1507974.”

     

    Note.  In November, James Thomson and Marian Press will be giving a new course on British India Family History Research, as described at http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html. As at this date, there are still some places available.

     

    The Forum
     
    Answer to Previous Question
    Q1/37/2006.  Ukraine.  Information on priests ordained in the Catholic Church in Ukraine.  Sonia van Heerden writes:
    "Re: Information on Priests in Galicia. The following is the Galician site. Your correspondent could go down to the Archives section for the month of September for more information.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Galicia_Poland-Ukraine/
    or
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Galicia_Poland-
    Ukraine/message/11230
    The queries are from September 16th to September 18th, under the subject heading "The Clergy Records
    "."
     
    New Questions
    Q1/42/2006.  England.  Some months ago you were asking people to come forward who could do translations. I am wondering if anyone came forward for Old English script of about 1560. I believe that the page in the Bishop’s Transcript was written in English because I can read some of the words but I cannot read them all and I have about given up!! The entire page seems to be about one of my ancestors which makes it very frustrating that I cannot read this. Is there someone you know of that might be able to help me? (Editors Note.  We cannot expect anyone to come forward to translate an entire document but perhaps someone might be willing to tackle some essential parts).
    Q2/42/2006.  England.  .- Is there any good way to go about searching for someone (and/or  their parents and siblings,etc) who was born in county Devon in England around 1830? Background to the question: Based on the 1861 British census,my great grandmother (Ann Walford) was born in 1830 in Devonport. Her parents emigrated to Montreal, apparently shortly after her birth. She married John Thompson, who was serving in the Royal Artillery in Montreal or vicinity, around 1850. While he was still in the military, they returned to England around 1850 or 1851, since their first known child was born in Woolwich in 1851. He stayed in the military until after the 1861 census, but then they emigrated to Ontario in 1862. Her birth was before civil registration started, and the LDS records do not seem to contain any church birth records (her family was almost certainly C of E) for the area of Devonport, or Plymouth, larger and nearby. According to some family notes by my mother, now deceased, Ann Walford had 3 named brothers and one named sister, but no indication of birth order, and no indication of parents’  names.
    Q3/42/2006.  Italy/U.S.A.
    1)  How far back are birth/death/marriage records from Italy available on microfilm?
    2)  Does the Church have all these microfilms available?
    3)  How can I trace the new name of an immigrant to America who changed his name in the 1920's or '30's?
     
    Films received in the 7 days ending 19 October 2006, due for return (unless renewed) 16 November 2006
     
    Film Content Film No
    CAN ON Haliburton Marrs 1923 2266894
    CAN PQ Roxton Falls PRs 1850-1879 1689493
    DEU PRE Budwethen Bapt 1858-1870 1813520
    DEU PRE Budwethen Bapt 1858-1870 1813519
    DEU PRE Tilsit Bapt 1850-1874 1857700
    DEU PRE Tilsit Prs 1642-1944 0072922
    ENG HRT East Barnet PRs 1951786
    ENG LAN Colton BTs 1826-1870 1040302
    ENG LAN Parr Bapt 1845-1908 1849649
    ENG NFK Sprowston St Marys Prs 1673-1915 1526137
    ENG NFK Thorpe-Nxt-Norwich PRs 1642-1814 0887916
    ENG NFK Thorpe-Nxt-Norwich PRs 1642-1906 1565275
    ENG SRY Newington PRs 1707 - 1816 2232070
    ENG SRY Rotherhithe PRs 1838 - 1854 0355650
    ENG SRY Rotherhithe PRs 1839 - 1841 0254538
    ENG WAR Birmingham Gen Cem M.I 0994072
    ENG WAR Parish Registers 0229106
    ENG WAR PRs Marrs 1853-1913 0097315
    ENG WOR Upton-o